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Curtis Franklin
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Curtis Franklin,
User Rank: Blogger
2/21/2017 | 3:06:45 PM
Re: IoT elements
mhui0, I'd quibble with your start date in a couple of ways:

In one direction, the IoT is even older, since embedded control systems were using proprietary networks for command and control back into the 1970s. In 1988, I became editor in chieft at Circuit Cellar INK, and we were certainly doing a lot with networked sensor and control systems.

In another direction, the use of the Internet as a key part of widespread embedded command and control is much more recent. I'm certain that TCP/IP was used for some control purposes prior to 1988, but it would have been in a research environment. I strongly suspect that we didn't start seeing any serious use until the late 90s, though I'm certainly willing to be corrected.

In any case, your basic point is sound: While we're getting alll excited about the IoT, the essential concepts (and even much of the technology) aren't new -- the only thing that's really changing is the scale of deployment and that, I think we can agree, is changing in a huge way!
Curtis Franklin
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Curtis Franklin,
User Rank: Blogger
2/21/2017 | 2:55:56 PM
Re: IoT elements
Joe, I think there are a lot of folks at companies like Intel that would absolutely agree with you. When I interviewed the head of Intel's drone program a few months back, I was struck by his labeling their massed-drone system a "compute platform."

To paraphrase a much older saying, if every tool is a computer, then every problem starts to look like software. Maybe it's just a short jump from where we are to the Internet of Everything.
Curtis Franklin
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Curtis Franklin,
User Rank: Blogger
2/21/2017 | 2:53:16 PM
Re: Secure, secure, secure
Michelle, the blended threat angle is interesting and the anwer is mostly, "Work with other systems to provide security in depth." Now, there are some companies that will say that they provide all the layers a company might need, but a growing number of vendors seem quite happy with taking a piece of the pie rather than trying to get you to make them a one-stop-shop for everything in security.
mhui0
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mhui0,
User Rank: Lightning
2/18/2017 | 8:26:30 PM
Re: IoT elements
The original IoT started back in 1988:

https://www.qualcomm.com/company/about/history

1988 - Qualcomm pioneers M2M communications

  • In August of 1988, the Company launches OmniTRACS, a satellite-based data communications system for the transportation industry that enables truck fleet operators to effectively track and monitor their vehicles in the field.
  • Later this year, Qualcomm receives its first major OmniTRACS order from Schneider National Trucking Company. Qualcomm is still a fledgling company and the order provides it with a much-needed capital infusion.

1985 - Qualcomm is founded

  • In July of 1985, seven people – Dr. Irwin M. Jacobs, Dr. Andrew Viterbi, Harvey White, Franklin Antonio, Andrew Cohen, Klein Gilhousen, and Adelia Coffman found Qualcomm, opening the Company's first office in La Jolla, California.
  • That same year, Qualcomm lands its first contract and begins working with CDMA, a unique digital wireless technology used by the U.S. military for secure communications.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/18/2017 | 2:06:28 PM
IoT elements
> The answer, of course, varies with precisely who's doing the defining.

I remember an IoT conference from a few years ago when one of the speakers told the audience that Uber qualified as IoT.

Note that this was well before Uber started using self-driving cars.

So to call Uber part of the Internet of Things as far back as 2014 was using an extremely liberal definition of IoT -- one that would potentially include email and all electronic communications systems as IoT.

It inspired me to write up my own analysis/story on the subject (link), and the definition I worked up boiled down to few key elements: automation, the non-necessity of a display, and the ability to effect real-world change (beyond merely pinging a human with a message).

From this perspective, IoT begins to look a lot like the beginnings of AI.
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/17/2017 | 2:37:39 PM
Secure, secure, secure
You're saying there's a lot to be secured, eh? Ever more sophisticated attacks are on the horizon, I'm sure. What are companies doing to protect against blended threats?


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