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voyanceaudiotel
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voyanceaudiotel,
User Rank: Light Beer
2/24/2017 | 12:15:59 PM
Re: The career-break penalty
Really interesting, The career-break penalty is a reality in France too :-(
Sarah Thomas
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Sarah Thomas,
User Rank: Blogger
2/17/2017 | 3:18:28 PM
Re: The career-break penalty
I agree that it's incumbent on the employee to demonstrate their skills are still sharp and their knowledge is up-to-date. They could've been keeping up with the industry over their gap, but I doubt any employer would take a chance on them at the same level and pay they used to be at. It seems like employers could do more to help then just demote them though. Perhaps start at a lower-paid less senior position with a six month to a year plan to move back up if you prove you can hang -- something similar to "returnships" but not at a measly pay without any promise of hiring you in the end?
mendyk
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mendyk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/17/2017 | 2:11:43 PM
Re: The career-break penalty
There are a few occupations in which someone could probably pick up where she or he left off in terms of skills, training, etc., but those are primarily lower-level jobs. For the most part, and especially with high-skill jobs in dynamic sectors like tech, it's unrealistic to expect immediate restoration. And really, it's up to the individual employee (not -er) to get back up to speed. That could mean taking a lesser position and working back up to the desired job. I doubt there was ever a time when the system accommodated the individual rather than the other way around, and I doubt that ever will be the case.
Sarah Thomas
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Sarah Thomas,
User Rank: Blogger
2/17/2017 | 1:42:07 PM
Re: The career-break penalty
It also depends on how long of a break we're talking, of course -- six months is different than 10 years. You would've missed at least three rounds of 'G"s by then.
Sarah Thomas
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Sarah Thomas,
User Rank: Blogger
2/17/2017 | 1:41:18 PM
Re: The career-break penalty
Ah yes, it certainly applies to anyone. It tends to be women who have a career break the most often, but would certainly apply to anyone who had to take time off for a health condition, to care for a loved one, to find themselves, etc. 

Do you think that's just the way it is and should be, or have an ideas on how to get employees back to work without penalty?
mendyk
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mendyk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/17/2017 | 11:13:12 AM
Re: The career-break penalty
It also applies to anyone who takes an involuntary "career break," regardless of gender, qualifications, level of experience, etc.
Sarah Thomas
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Sarah Thomas,
User Rank: Blogger
2/17/2017 | 10:50:21 AM
Re: The career-break penalty
No, all the evidence suggests the exact opposite, which is the problem some companies are trying to rectify with "returnships."
mendyk
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mendyk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/17/2017 | 10:09:54 AM
Re: The career-break penalty
Is there any evidence to suggest that anyone who takes a "career break" can pick up exactly where he or she left off in terms of job quality or compensation?
Sarah Thomas
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Sarah Thomas,
User Rank: Blogger
2/17/2017 | 9:48:44 AM
The career-break penalty
Thought this new study from PwC was interesting about women returning to work after a break in their career. In the UK, there are apparently around 478,000 women currently taking a break in their career, but with the intention of returning. Upon returning, they find they can't find jobs commensurate to what the had before in terms of pay, and they can't find the flexibility they need, so they take lower paid positions they are over-qualified for.

The report conclude that returnships are a good way to help get them back up to speed quickly. As we've discussed here before, I am not a big fan of returnships or the idea of making well-qualified women spend months interning at a measly hourly pay just for a chance at a full-time job. 

I think this is an opportunity for a site like Werk, which we covered on Tuesday, to seek out employers wtih flexible job options for women who are returning to the workforce after a career break. Both the companies and women would benefit here.

http://pwc.blogs.com/gender_agenda/2017/02/women-returners.html

 


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