& cplSiteName &
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
ErynLeavens
ErynLeavens
9/2/2016 | 1:28:38 PM
Re: Girl bosses or just bosses?
I see how the term could be condescending but I don't think it's intended to be, as you said, Sarah. I also don't think it's meant to describe regular "bosses" or managers, rather, it's a much higher level of career success, like Marissa Mayer or Sheryl Sandberg (is anyone else a little tired of those two names always being the example?!). It's meant for a women who truly rules, more like the term "diva," so in that sense, I like it. It's definitely tongue in cheek though, which can mean it's harder to take seriously. But these "girl bosses" are doing pretty well for themselves, and if money is power, I think that speaks louder than the cute phrase of the week. All publicity is good publicity! Maybe...
Sarah Thomas
Sarah Thomas
9/2/2016 | 12:50:28 PM
Re: Girl bosses or just bosses?
Yes; well said! My mom was a flight attendant too on TWA, and I always correct people who call them stewardesses. :)
Kelsey Ziser
Kelsey Ziser
9/2/2016 | 12:46:30 PM
Re: Girl bosses or just bosses?
I'm not a huge fan of the term "girl boss" either. My mom was a flight attendant for over 30 years and gave me a lot of insight into how that industry changed. One example was an industry-wide switch from the term "stewardess" to "flight attendant" and my mom made it pretty clear that she should be called a "flight attendant." The term stewardness carried a lot of baggage - it was a term widely used when airlines enforced a lot of rules on flight attendants' appearance and even had weight requirements. So, if we're looking at "girl boss" through that lense, I think we're going backwards, not forwards. We should just stick with the term "boss" and keep it gender neutral. (See Here's Why Flight Attendants Don't Like Being Called 'Stewardess')
ErynLeavens
ErynLeavens
9/2/2016 | 12:37:43 PM
Re: Another great round up
$4.3 trillion!! That's huge. It would definitely be interesting to provide some sort of incentive for companies to start making back this money. I don't see how that enormous figure isn't enough of a draw in itself! Also an incredibly complicated calculation... So many factors in there.
Sarah Thomas
Sarah Thomas
9/2/2016 | 10:43:11 AM
Girl bosses or just bosses?
I know it's meant to be empowering, but I don't love "girl boss." Female bosses are just bosses. On the one hand calling them out as "girls" (women?) makes it sound like they are anomalies, but -- on the other hand -- they are anomalies still, unfortunately. it's It's like saying "male nurse"or "manny."

What do you all think -- should we highlight the fact that these CEOs and leaders are women or will that hurt the cause to normalize women at the top?
Sarah Thomas
Sarah Thomas
9/2/2016 | 10:39:24 AM
Re: Another great round up
Agreed; a great round up! McKinsey had a recent study that looked at this for the US as well. They said:

Achieving gender parity in the US could add $4.3 trillion to the country's economy in 2025, according to new research from McKinsey & Co. The report finds that every US state and city can add at least 5% to their GDP over the next ten years by advancing the economic potential of women. Half of US states could add more than 10%, and the country's 50 largest cities can increase GDP by 6% to 13%. Silicon Valley stands to gain 9%. 

Pretty compelling numbers! 

http://www.lightreading.com/business-employment/women-in-comms/wicipedia-parental-progress-and-parity-payoffs/a/d-id/722486
TeleWRTRLiz
TeleWRTRLiz
9/2/2016 | 10:27:39 AM
Another great round up
Thinking more about this: "UN did the math and found that pervasive gender inequality in this part of the world costs Africa $95 billion per year in lost economic growth," I wonder what the numbers would look like in the US for the tech industry and if perhaps looking at it from that angle would give companies and kick in the pants to change? Does anyone know of an organization trying to research the Women in Comms challenge from that angle?


Featured Video
Upcoming Live Events
September 17-19, 2019, Dallas, Texas
October 1-2, 2019, New Orleans, Louisiana
October 10, 2019, New York, New York
October 22, 2019, Los Angeles, CA
November 5, 2019, London, England
November 7, 2019, London, UK
November 14, 2019, Maritim Hotel, Berlin
December 3-5, 2019, Vienna, Austria
December 3, 2019, New York, New York
March 16-18, 2020, Embassy Suites, Denver, Colorado
May 18-20, 2020, Irving Convention Center, Dallas, TX
All Upcoming Live Events