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KBode
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KBode,
User Rank: Light Sabre
8/24/2016 | 12:13:58 PM
Re: Comcast cable TV
So many of these companies are still struggling to support 1080p without horrid compression artifacts, so I wonder if it doesnt' take many more years before real 4K even becomes a serious option.
kq4ym
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kq4ym,
User Rank: Light Sabre
8/24/2016 | 11:27:20 AM
Re: Comcast cable TV
It would seem that somebody's trying to figure a way to get profit from the huge bandwidth they're promoting for our future entertainment, With a given "HDR picture at 60 frames per second, Comcast is using a whopping 35Mbit/s bitrate," it's going to be a technical if not financial challenge to get users to cough up for extra bandwitch and display devices. Even if encoding can get the bitrate down, it's still huge.
KBode
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KBode,
User Rank: Light Sabre
8/16/2016 | 5:32:24 PM
Re: Comcast cable TV
"HDR takes advantage of broadband in ways that only these huge cable providers can offer." In time, but it has been interesting to see Amazon and Netflix lead the charge on this front. I'm hoping that cable providers don't shoot themselves in the foot with a "4K" or "4K + HDR" surcharge at a time when more and more customers are defecting due to pricing. Though I guess bleeding edge folks care less about price...
Duh!
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Duh!,
User Rank: Blogger
8/15/2016 | 1:37:43 PM
Bit Rates
Observe the dynamic between video source bit rates and access network bandwidth demand. The typical justification for more bandwidth has been ever higher-quality video.  Yet 4k HD for current OTT video is around 15-20 Mbit/s, and Mark Francisco is saying that 20 Mb/s will hold when HDR and 60 FPS are introduced.  It appears that the video coding folks treat 20 Mb/s as a design constraint. That makes a lot of sense in the context of MPEG2 framing on 6 MHz channels. It will be interesting to see what happens with linear programing migrating to all-IP, and therefore able to take advantage of channel bonding and DOCSIS 3.1. 

In the meanwhile, a Gigabit can carry a lot more 4k HD HDR 60 FPS streams than are likely to appear in any household. We still have no line of sight to a "killer app" for Gigabit, other than Speed Test.  Ultimate quality video apparently isn't it.

 
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Light Sabre
8/14/2016 | 6:42:34 PM
Re: Comcast cable TV
Excited to see HDR come to the home. The potential for the technology to make sports more vivid is going to be really helpful for companies like Comcast since they are seeing declining cable revenue. HDR takes advantage of broadband in ways that only these huge cable providers can offer. 
abhijeet.shirgurkar
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abhijeet.shirgurkar,
User Rank: Light Beer
8/12/2016 | 12:12:02 PM
Comcast cable TV
Not sure if it means anything to the customer. They make the customer pay for cable TV in order to watch all live online olympic streams. Why would anybody pay cable TV charges so that they are able to access online content. Both of them must be independent of each other. 


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