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kq4ym
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kq4ym,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/26/2016 | 10:06:31 AM
Re: Wonder if tort laws may change company opinions...
And it does seem true that the "pendulum tends to swing between the need for perceived security and perceived privacy, depending whether a country is on a war footing or in a prolonged peaceful period." And maybe also depending on what hardware/software industry lobbyists have money to spend for influence to legislators as well.
gconnery
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gconnery,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/24/2016 | 5:00:38 PM
Re: Wonder if tort laws may change company opinions...
Well there have been a couple of honest to goodness examples recently, so lets see how those go.  Juniper shipped its NetScreen appliances for years with a backdoor they apparently inserted at the request of the NSA.  It was used by the NSA/GCHQ to break into that SIM vendor a while back.  Somebody, presumably chinese sponsored hackers, changed the code so that they could use the backdoor instead of the NSA.  That shipped for a few years.  Then recently they noticed the change or the NSA alerted them and they put the original code back.  Yes the backdoor is still there.  Now that it is widely know I assuming other actors, at the very least state actors, will use this backdoor to break into company networks. 

So... has Juniper's sales been harmed by these revelations?  Are people adding language to their contracts requiring Juniper et al to promise there are no backdoors?  Have there been or will there be any lawsuits against Juniper for this breach of customer security/promises/expectations?  Lets see...
ethertype
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ethertype,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/23/2016 | 6:49:15 PM
Re: Wonder if tort laws may change company opinions...
Point taken.  Never assume that common sense will influence a jury damage award.
flake
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flake,
User Rank: Light Beer
2/23/2016 | 6:44:25 PM
Re: Wonder if tort laws may change company opinions...
I would agree.  However, I didn't think a company could get sued for coffee served too hot.
ethertype
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ethertype,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/23/2016 | 6:34:47 PM
Re: Wonder if tort laws may change company opinions...
No chance, unless the companies are actively aiding terrorists.  They're far more likely to be held liable for damages arising from products they sell with known but concealed security vulnerabilities (including back doors). 
flake
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flake,
User Rank: Light Beer
2/23/2016 | 2:31:00 PM
Wonder if tort laws may change company opinions...
It's probably only a matter of time before the relatives of terrorism victims will sue such companies claiming their refusal to cooperate prevented terrible acts from being stopped.  A few $50M+ lawsuits won by those in the court system might sway their opinions.
DanJones
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DanJones,
User Rank: Blogger
2/23/2016 | 12:53:44 PM
Re: False dichotomy
That's why he said backdoors into products create problems.
Mitch Wagner
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Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
2/23/2016 | 12:38:44 PM
Jurassic Park
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/23/2016 | 12:20:33 PM
Re: False dichotomy
Indeed, Mitch.  The problems of information security and data privacy are perhaps more properly lumped under the heading of "data protection" for these and other reasons.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/23/2016 | 12:19:43 PM
Taking a stand
That's being put in a tough spot, arguably.  On the one hand, the CEO understand the problems of weakening encryption and the importance of protecting user data.  On the other hand, one could see how he wouldn't want to draw heightened regulatory scrutiny/wrath when his company is not the one on the spot right now.

I guess the only way to actually know where a tech CEO stands on the issue is to wait until his or her company comes under fire.  We know where Tim Cook stands, in any case.
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