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TV Monitor
TV Monitor
2/16/2016 | 4:44:00 PM
Re: Race to be first
Dan Jones

"Recall that the Apple A9 processor is already built by Samsung and TSMC to Apple's design."

Apple doesn't build its own LTE modem, it buys them as discrete chips from Qualcomm and Intel. Apple doesn't have the ability to design its own modem chip.

Apple A series is just a processor package that requires external modem, unlike Snapdragon 820 and Exynos 8890 that integrate an LTE modem.
DanJones
DanJones
2/16/2016 | 2:46:07 PM
Re: Race to be first
Recall that the Apple A9 processor is already built by Samsung and TSMC to Apple's design. I suspect they'd probably want 2 suppliers for baseband chips just to be safe, but its not impossible that they could use different suppliers if they're happy with them.
TV Monitor
TV Monitor
2/15/2016 | 9:57:16 AM
Re: Race to be first
lanbrown

"Apple is not producing their own baseband chipset.  Intel and Qualcomm will be whom they need to convince since they are primarily the major players."

Well, Apple will have to start buying from Samsung and Mediatek/Spreadtrum for mmWave 5G and Chinese TD-LTE+ modems. Qualcomm could also do modems for both standards. After all, it is the antenna that's the secret sauce of the Samsung 28 Ghz 5G format, not the signal processor. TD-LTE+ doesn't require anything special in terms of antenna.

"Chinese base stations are not banned; the US government made it quite clear"

Softbank specifically agreed to remove all Chinese equipment from Sprint's network as the condition of takeover, and in fact Dan Jones wrote a big article about the non-compliance of this agreement here. http://www.lightreading.com/mobile/4g-lte/surprise!-sprint-still-has-huawei-in-its-network/d/d-id/720373

Thus Huawei and ZTE will need to license the TD-LTE+ base station design to a non-Chinese vendor and provide a slice of Chinese domestic TD-LTE+ base station market in order to service Sprint.
lanbrown
lanbrown
2/15/2016 | 1:53:17 AM
Re: Race to be first
It is not the handset makers that they need to worry about but the chipset manufacturers.  Apple is not producing their own baseband chipset.  Intel and Qualcomm will be whom they need to convince since they are primarily the major players.  Samsung is getting there since they have finally started to use their own in their handsets.

 

Chinese base stations are not banned; the US government made it quite clear though that the use of Chinese equipment will preclude that telco from government contracts.  Will Sprint/Softbak go the cheap route but sacrifice the ability to service the government or convince other equipment manufacturers to produce gear for them?  Most telcos use two vendors to get better pricing.  Convincing two might be hard for Sprint and pricing may not be on their (Sprint) side.

 

The only place where the Chinese are banned like Huawei are from US Government contracts.
TV Monitor
TV Monitor
2/15/2016 | 1:24:06 AM
Re: Race to be first
lanbrown

"I still don't think Sprint has the capital to expend on it."

Softbank had it worse in its early days. After all, it was the cheap pricing of Chinese equipment that allowed Softbank to expand its LTE network fast.

"Most carriers of the world went with FDD but Sprint went TDD for the 2.5GHz band."

Oh, Softbank is also primarily TDD in Japan and it doesn't have a problem with user terminals, because Apple and Samsung make TDD iPhone and Galaxy for Chinese market and for Softbank.

Securing the TD-LTE+ user terminals won't be a problem, but sourcing base stations will be, since Chinese telco equipment are banned in the US and Softbank must find a non-Chinese vendor of TD-LTE+ equipment for Sprint.
lanbrown
lanbrown
2/14/2016 | 5:52:01 PM
Re: Race to be first
I still don't think Sprint has the capital to expend on it.  They could just follow what Softbank is doing.  They could also be left behind when it comes to government contracts though or vendor selection.  With Sprint almost being the sole 2.5GHz holder, many vendors may not see the benefit of supporting it.

 

Take LTE; there is TDD and FDD.  Most carriers of the world went with FDD but Sprint went TDD for the 2.5GHz band.
TV Monitor
TV Monitor
2/14/2016 | 11:11:01 AM
Re: Race to be first
lanbrown

"Could Sprint afford pre-standards though?"

Softbank is already fully committed behind the Chinese 5G standard. In the US, this means 2.5 Ghz band. Softbank won't touch mmwave 5G stuff.
DanJones
DanJones
2/13/2016 | 2:58:50 PM
Re: AT&T's FCC filing
If they can't afford tests then they're in worse trouble than we thought. They've said they will wait for the standards. Seems fair enough!
lanbrown
lanbrown
2/13/2016 | 2:04:10 AM
Re: Race to be first
Could Sprint afford pre-standards though?  AT&T and Verizon are willing to spend the money.
DanJones
DanJones
2/12/2016 | 5:16:45 PM
Re: Verizon
Verizon hasn't revealed exactly what it will test as "5G" yet.
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