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kq4ym
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kq4ym,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/10/2016 | 10:03:53 AM
Re: Thanks, but...
With Chairman Wheeler's assurance that a "virtual headend solution would require no new hardware." it should be clear to at least the advantages to the consumer if not the industry would be great. Only the near monopolistic advantages of the service providers with proprietary gear would suffer some downsides, at that may only be temporary, as customers may very well flock to subscription services once they have more freedom to choose.
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/2/2016 | 11:36:57 AM
Re: Thanks, but...
I think something needs to be done.

Television as a product is just not very good, and I think there is a ton of opportunity for innovation. Just look at what Netflix has been able to do on exiting digital platforms. What if there were set-top devices that could innovate cable?
KBode
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KBode,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/1/2016 | 12:26:23 PM
Re: Thanks, but...
"I feel like I had this same conversation last week about Open Access.  Why are we spending time (regulator time or technologist time or standards body time) on something that is being killed."

I see both sides of that argument. I do see merit in the idea that the FCC may not want to wade into another protracted CableCARD fight when the legacy TV industry is set to be totally disrupted anyway.

Still, cord cutting is a glacially slow trend, and I can see the cable TV market remaining viably powerful for a decade, especially if they're willing to compete on price. Under that model it would still be greatly beneficial to have an open set top competition system in place.

At the end of the day this solely comes down to protecting that $20 billion in annual set top box fees, which I have no sympathy for. 

 

Granted time spent on this issue is time NOT spent on other issues that won't be going away, like usage caps and zero rating, and how those hinder streaming platforms. 
msilbey
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msilbey,
User Rank: Blogger
2/1/2016 | 11:58:06 AM
Re: Thanks, but...
Not sure I'm following all of your arguments here. Content may be available over streaming services, but it's not easily available to other third parties, a la TiVo, that want to create new navigation experiences without getting into the content services business. 

Also, efforts to keep content away from Netflix is part of what the FCC reportedly had issues with when it looked at the Comcast/TWC merger. So whether programmers want a large audience or not, there will be times when powerful interests can keep (or at least try to keep) programming away from new upstarts.

Finally, see here for more details on networking from a single set-top to multiple screens: http://apps.fcc.gov/ecfs/document/view.action?id=60001330156 
brooks7
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brooks7,
User Rank: Light Sabre
2/1/2016 | 10:01:45 AM
Re: Thanks, but...
 

Mari,

 

Can you name 1 single piece of video content not available via streaming?

 

How do I get HDMI ports over to TVs?  If you are saying that I can do it via Ethernet or WiFi, then I am not sure why that is any different than any other streaming service.  See the point?

So, the question is will Linear TV be dead in 10 years?  If so, will it take more time than that to develop and deploy a whole new series of STBs?  There is no way that a cableco is bulk replacing all the STBs that are deployed.  That means it takes many years to replace the boxes.  This is a significant problem given that essentially the service has 100% take rate and everybody already has an STB.  The total number (at least in the US) is likely to decline over time. 

Which is why I think we are trying to solve a problem that the market has already solved.

seven

 

Edit:  If you haven't thought about it, there is a huge reason why content is not locked up.  There are 100s of millions of subs that don't have your service on a global basis.  By restricting your content to your own subs, no matter how large, you essentially cut your market by a huge percentage.  If you live where I do and you lock your content into Charter cable subs, then I can never get it.  I am in a Comcast property.  

This is the mistake I see made here all the time.  There are so many more subs NOT on your network. 

 
msilbey
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msilbey,
User Rank: Blogger
2/1/2016 | 9:50:10 AM
Re: Thanks, but...
brooks7- You won't need 1 STB per TV. You can connect up to 5 or 6 screens off one box.

Also, to your other point about cable and linear TV, sure the model's changing, but the point is there will continue to be entrenched entities (including probably Comcast and Charter) that right now have the ability to lock their content up in apps (or on their legacy cable systems) with total control over the interface. For other companies that don't want to be their own video service providers, the ability to innovate on top of that content experience goes away. 
thebulk
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thebulk,
User Rank: Light Sabre
1/31/2016 | 2:12:50 PM
Re: Thanks, but...
Probably not at all. I would guess not one bit. 
brooks7
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brooks7,
User Rank: Light Sabre
1/31/2016 | 2:01:30 AM
Re: Thanks, but...
So, in 6 years will Cable and Sattelite as Linear Pay TV still matter?

seven

 
davidhoffman5
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davidhoffman5,
User Rank: Lightning
1/31/2016 | 12:42:13 AM
This should be easy.
This should be relatively easy. I have seen USB memory sticks with DoD and NSA high security hardware and firmware. The cable companies requirements are not any more demanding and should not be any more demanding. The technology to do this is out there. The subscriber should be able to go to a Big Box Bargain Bin store and select from many dozens of different DVRs that can be purchased. Buy one. Take it home. Plug it in. Insert new cable card and it works. 
davidhoffman5
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davidhoffman5,
User Rank: Lightning
1/31/2016 | 12:28:45 AM
Re: Thanks, but...
We still need this because many cable subscribers desire it as a solution. They are not into using OTT as much as they want to be able to get a set top box of their choice, the same as they did with VCRs. Go to nearby Big Box store. Pick from the 100 different set tops on display. Take home and plug in cable card to make work. The FCC needs to show strength with this.  A bidirectional cable card with full security was possible over 20 years ago. We could have had numerous choices of set top boxes back then. We should have it today. We should have it in the very near future. Various technical wizards have proven it can be done at a reasonable cost. If you want to do the whole home decryption route, that is acceptable also, but it needs to lead to being able to get your own DVR from Big Box and using it with ease in your home. I can do it for internet service with a generic DOCSIS compliant modem, so I should also be able to do it with the video service from a traditional cable company, wireline telephone company, or one of the newfangled companies like Google Fiber, LUS Fiber, EPB Fiber.

The satellite situation? Well with AT&T purchasing DirecTV, DirecTV will be included in the list of companies that have to comply because AT&T U-Verse will be in the mix. Dish Network? They can be given some extra time, maybe up to 6 years, beyond the time frame for the others to comply. 

 

 
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