& cplSiteName &
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
8/26/2015 | 6:31:11 PM
Re: Gender lens
Yeah, the best possible outcome here is that promoting women in the workplace ends up promoting women AND men who work and think in ways traditionally identified as feminine. 
Sarah Thomas
50%
50%
Sarah Thomas,
User Rank: Blogger
8/25/2015 | 12:03:08 PM
Re: Gender lens
I don't think the definitions are that narrow. There is a definite bell curve here -- not all women are one way and not all men are another. There are certain things about me that I think are a me thing rather than a woman thing, to your point. But, in general, there are real gender differences that can be leveraged to build a better company. 

And, as you point out, there are some women and men who naturally fit the opposite stereotypes, but the work environment needs to allow them to thrive as well. It can't be one-sided either way.
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
8/25/2015 | 11:54:12 AM
Re: Gender lens
I'm skeptical here. In my experience, individual differences outweigh gender-based differences. In my career, I have worked with many men who are great at collaborating and women who were prima donnas. 

Many men are not suited to applying aggressive sales tactics. Some of these men are great salesmen. 

Consider war: Historically, a male pursuit -- THE male pursuit -- and requiring significant degrees of collaboration.

I'm concerned that narrow definitions of how men think and how women think is going to hurt men who think in stereotypically female ways, and vice-versa. 
Sarah Thomas
100%
0%
Sarah Thomas,
User Rank: Blogger
8/25/2015 | 10:15:47 AM
Gender lens
Barbara is a pioneer in the field of gender intelligence and talking with her was really enlightening. As she said, women-focused initiatives and balanced recruiting practices are great, but there really has to be a company culture shift to make an authentic and lasting difference.

She suggests really analyzing the data a company already has through a "gender lens" to assess the company culture and see where changes need to be made. This data can include the gender split at all levels of the company, the decision making process, the values that a company emphasises (either on purpose or in practice), and more. I'm sure it's often surprising to see how your company fares. Next step is, of course, do something about it. 

How do you think your company would look when viewed through this gender lens?


Featured Video
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
September 17-19, 2019, Dallas, Texas
October 1-2, 2019, New Orleans, Louisiana
October 10, 2019, New York, New York
October 22, 2019, Los Angeles, CA
November 5, 2019, London, England
November 7, 2019, London, UK
December 3, 2019, New York, New York
December 3-5, 2019, Vienna, Austria
March 16-18, 2020, Embassy Suites, Denver, Colorado
May 18-20, 2020, Irving Convention Center, Dallas, TX
All Upcoming Live Events