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mendyk 8/18/2015 | 2:49:54 PM
Re: Amazon's drones in the UK first Some people, yes. Hopeless romantics, not so much.
Ariella 8/18/2015 | 2:03:26 PM
Re: Amazon's drones in the UK first @mendyK sort of the way people like to trade up cars, phones, or spouses? 
mendyk 8/18/2015 | 12:00:41 PM
Re: Amazon's drones in the UK first Everyone can be replaced -- that's just a circle of life thing. "Disposable" suggests an intentionally aggressive attitude toward replacement. Think of it this way: If your pet is sick, you are likely to take it to a vet to help it get better. But if that doesn't help and it dies, you would likely get another pet. That's replacement. If your pet is sick, and you immediately terminate it for a newer, healthier pet, that's treating it like a disposable commodity.
Susan Fourtané 8/18/2015 | 11:58:37 AM
Re: Amazon's drones in the UK first mendyk, " . . . it sounds important." How funny. :) Well, yes, you may be right. Yet, there are so many things that seem to be due by 2020 that, I suppose, at least some of them will have to happen. -Susan
Ariella 8/18/2015 | 11:50:04 AM
Re: Amazon's drones in the UK first <But there's a difference between replaceable and disposable,> @mendyk do you mean replacing the employee with another one vs. getting rid of the position altogether? Or do you have something else in mind?
mendyk 8/18/2015 | 11:46:47 AM
Re: Amazon's drones in the UK first All employees are replaceable, and companies have to operate on that assumption. But there's a difference between replaceable and disposable, and to borrow an idea from Malcolm Gladwell, companies like Amazon have reached the tipping point. More companies will get to that point faster as purely data-driven decision-making takes hold.
Ariella 8/18/2015 | 11:40:37 AM
Re: Amazon's drones in the UK first <ultimately, employees are interchangeable resources, and at least 90% of them are disposable resources. > @mendyk for all their lip service about how much they value their people, ultimatley, isn't that the way nearly all corporations view employees, whether they're in retail, finance, or even education?  
mendyk 8/18/2015 | 11:36:36 AM
Re: Amazon's drones in the UK first As has been pointed out numerous times since the Times story ran, Amazon's data-driven evaluation process is nothing new. But Bezos (and yes, this is on him) and some of his counterparts are moving it to the extreme and logical conclusion -- that ultimately, employees are interchangeable resources, and at least 90% of them are disposable resources. The other 10% will make sure the process maintains.
Ariella 8/18/2015 | 11:08:36 AM
Re: Amazon's drones in the UK first <When those of us who remain get to December 31 of the year in question, we'll probably come to the conclusion that 2020 was just another year, like all the others. We tend to point to it because, like 2000, it sounds important.>

@MendyK I was thinking along similar lines just yesterday when I left the comment on a post making predictions about the future of IoT, etc. I asked if anyone ever looks back at th predictions to see if they have been realized. I discovered that there were some predictions made for this year, but living in it, we don't feel like there's been a real revolution. Also some of the projects predicted to change things around are still works in progress. 
Ariella 8/18/2015 | 11:06:09 AM
Re: Who needs unions @mendyk and the truth is that they are subject to similar conditions in many corporations. It's a kind of white collar sweatshop, but as the people do choose to stay -- for there is nothing really preventing them from leaving -- it's not going to become a civil rights issue. 
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