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brooks7
brooks7
3/23/2015 | 11:24:32 AM
Re: marketing speak
Rural markets have quickly adapted new technology for 1 reason:  Government Intervention.  The US Government (and sometimes State Governments) have subsidized the small rural carriers for decades.  The smallest of these carriers are muni-owned, but not all of them are.  They definitely see themselves as serving their local community as a priority and want to deliver higher speeds.  The challenge normally is that they can not redo more than a portion of their network in any given year.  It might take them 3 years to redo 10K lines.  But let's remember for some of those carriers that is all they have...10K lines.

Rural Carriers spend a much higher precentage of their budget on Access than large carriers because the cost per line that they have is so much higher.  Compare Cyan and Calix for example (two companies local to me).  Calix can build a fine business (as AFC did before it) without breaking into Western Europe or AT&T and Verizon.  Cyan...not so much.  That is the difference in spending in the small carriers between Access and Transport.

seven
Phil_Britt
Phil_Britt
3/23/2015 | 10:59:32 AM
Re: marketing speak
Rural areas don't have the population density of the cities, but they also don't have some of the higher costs for labor, building, political graft :) and other expenses of operating in a city. Years ago when broadband was relatively new, Wisconsin was the most connected state in the country because VOIP phones meant far lower total telecom expense costs (due to the price of long-distance landline calls) for consumers 
kq4ym
kq4ym
3/21/2015 | 8:32:55 PM
Re: Suburbs?
i wonder too why there's growth in the big cities and rural. Maybe there's some sort of subsidy going on by the equipment supplier in this case, as they seem to want to get a toe hold in the rural market?
jasonmeyers
jasonmeyers
3/19/2015 | 8:26:07 AM
Re: marketing speak
Agreed, Daniel. I love the concept of intelligent agriculture, too, and what technology can do for farmers. 
jasonmeyers
jasonmeyers
3/19/2015 | 8:23:13 AM
Re: marketing speak
Some of the other service providers have said this same thing -- that customers don't understand what "gigabit" means. But I agree with you -- seems odd that they would understand megabits and not gigabits. More often, there is confusion between gigabits and gigabytes. Remember, too, that many operators -- big ones like AT&T and small ones like Paul Bunyan (the telecom operator, not the mythical folk hero) -- are using the word "gigabit" or at least the prefix "giga" in their branding (GigaZone, GigaPower, etc.). 

I, for one, plan to name my next child Gigabit Meyers to get a jump on the trend. Either that or Paul Bunyan Meyers. 
jasonmeyers
jasonmeyers
3/19/2015 | 8:19:04 AM
Re: Suburbs?
It varies market to market. In some larger markets, like Kansas City and Austin, the various operators there are paying attention to the suburbs to varying degrees. In some cities, some operators are addressing the suburbs and NOT the urban core, presumably because the suburbs are where there is more residential density. Every market is unique, which makes it really interesting. I find rural markets like this the most interesting, because they are the most unlikely and in turn require the most unique business models.  
danielcawrey
danielcawrey
3/18/2015 | 8:16:12 PM
Re: marketing speak
I see a lot of potential for internet of things technology in rural areas. The fact that these types of geographic areas are looking to make sure they don't fall behind is a really good sign that IoT will proliferate in those areas – which will ultimately be good for economic development there. 
Mitch Wagner
Mitch Wagner
3/18/2015 | 3:52:12 PM
Suburbs?
It seems that gigabit is coming to big cities and rural areas, not so much to suburbs. Is that accurate? 
Mitch Wagner
Mitch Wagner
3/18/2015 | 3:51:31 PM
Re: marketing speak
Sarah, I was just thinking the same thing -- megabits per second seems like a much more difficult concept for laypeople to grasp than gigabit does. But the real test is what the network can actually do. 
sarahthomas1011
sarahthomas1011
3/18/2015 | 2:23:33 PM
marketing speak
I'm surprised that he said Gigabit doesn't resonate with his customers, but megabits per second does. I've heard the opposite from most other carriers. On the wireless front, most switched to advertising what the network can do, or BS monikers for 4G, instead of talking about megabits per second. 


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