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Phil_Britt
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Phil_Britt,
User Rank: Light Sabre
11/30/2014 | 5:13:36 PM
Re: Net Neutrality hasn't been defined
Geronimo,

 

While "the little guy" shouldn't get shut out on the Internet, there is something to be said for someone such as Netflix being able to paymore for a preferred fast lane. If providers can earn more by providing these preferred fast lanes, they will go out of their way to remove bottlenecks to provide even more of them.
MikeP688
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MikeP688,
User Rank: Light Sabre
11/27/2014 | 11:34:08 AM
Re: Why not kick Netflix of the Internet instead?
It is fascinating to be witness to history and how it has truly evolved.   The question is whether Netflix will understand that and embrace the "new reality" at hand.    But the need of the few should not outweight the greater good of the many.

Happy Thanksgiving.
yarn
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yarn,
User Rank: Light Sabre
11/27/2014 | 8:22:43 AM
Why not kick Netflix of the Internet instead?
Let's face it, over the top long form video such as Netflix doesn't scale on the Internet as it is. Remember the PSTN and the early beginnnigs of the Internet? You could yack for a nickle as long as you wanted and all were happy, until people started to connect dial-up Internet modems that tied up lines for hours. Service providers coundn't distinguish between regular phone calls or dial up and couldn't add trunk ports fast enough, to ensure people wouldn't get a busy tone on their life line phone services. Ultimately this was untenable. A dedicate broadband network was built, Internet dial-up was offloaded from the PSTN, and the Internet really took off. There was no need for any regulation to force service providers to keep scaling the PSTN for Internet dial-up usage and the outcome led to a much better Internet for every one.

Fast forward 15 years and we have over-the-top commercial video generating a busy tone on the Internet during prime time hours. This is not an issue of the Internet as it is but and issue of the way it's being used and monetized. And like before, the solution is to offload this traffic to a video delivery network designed for that. And guess what? Every cable and telecom operator already has such a video distribution network! How wonderful! Perfect HD quality for House of Cards any time of the day. The full library of Netflix VoD at your finger tips. A broadband video network that already reaches every household. Imagine how fast the Internet will become when over half of it's peak traffic gets offloaded!

It's time for Netflix to realize that the Internet was fine as a bootstrap network to get their business started, just like the PSTN was in the early days of the Internet, but will limit their further growth. Especially now they're becoming a content provider like every other, they're better off using the distribution infrastructure already in place. Better for them and better for the Internet.
MikeP688
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MikeP688,
User Rank: Light Sabre
11/27/2014 | 2:08:32 AM
Re: ISP Oligopoly
I like how Mr. Wagner notes about Mark Cuban being "Plain Spoken".   As a Shark Tank Fan, I enjo how he rips apart the aspirants.  But, he's "kind of" sitting pretty because if and when the multiple tiers (as the carriers and content providers want) is created, it will benefit those high end "consumers" like Mr. Cuban.   Mr Wagner's sentiment is on point as he reinds us all that "..The FCC Needs to make a decision" .   The problem is the the shifting political reality in Washington that is underscored by simplistic statements from Senator Cruz and others who seem to abhnor anything that smacks of some sense of the Public Interest.   

Here is another Far-Fetched Idea:  Why can't Netflix Buy out Dish Network and create the fastest bandwith out there?   

 
MikeP688
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MikeP688,
User Rank: Light Sabre
11/27/2014 | 2:05:24 AM
Re: ISP Oligopoly
THis is not a "political discussion".     Do we want to implicity trust the carriers or the service providers exclusively without a realization of the public interest in mind?    Why not insure that the carriers upgrade their existing infrastrctuure?

 

 
MikeP688
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MikeP688,
User Rank: Light Sabre
11/27/2014 | 1:51:44 AM
Re: Net Neutrality hasn't been defined
Isn't that the whole point?  That prioritization should not happen--we cannot have multi-tier levels of service under the guise of "innovation".    As I see it, the categories per se should not matter.    As Mark Cuban's co-shark, Kevin O' Leary likes to say, it is about "Money".   The carriers want it for one simple reason: create a revenue stream at the expense of fairness which is the underpinning of net neutrality as I see it.

 

 
MikeP688
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MikeP688,
User Rank: Light Sabre
11/27/2014 | 1:45:35 AM
Re: ISP Oligopoly
There is no question about " easy answers".   What I wonder is what you recommend?    I saw you noting abou the challenges.    Looking forward to your insights.

 
brooks7
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brooks7,
User Rank: Light Sabre
11/26/2014 | 7:15:57 PM
Re: ISP Oligopoly
"I have FIOS - fiber to the home. It is not over subscribed. I can get gigabit sevvice on it if want to pay $500/mth. "

You made a statement....

seven

PS - Oversubscription is a provisioning thing.  How many times the bandwidth have they sold is the question.  You are thinking of congestion, which is a real time - hey how much bandwidth is flowing right now.

 
jonsmirl
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jonsmirl,
User Rank: Light Beer
11/26/2014 | 6:19:04 PM
Re: ISP Oligopoly
brooks7,

This was not a general problem with oversubscription. Most of the Internet was working fine for me. I was even getting 40Mb/s on transcontinential links. When doing traceroutes on the problems, every problem access traced back to the same Cogent/Verizon exchange in NYC.
geronimo1000
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geronimo1000,
User Rank: Light Beer
11/26/2014 | 5:08:11 PM
Net Neutrality hasn't been defined
Net Neutrality means different things to different people. People generally agree that services within the same category should not have unfair priority over competing services.

But what if I, as your ISP, prioritize your VoIP and Netflix traffic over your FTP and Bittorrent traffic? Should QoS really be against the law?
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