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R Clark 8/24/2014 | 9:58:49 AM
Re: network management considerations I can see the attraction, LTE U being more easy to integrate into existing LTE RAN, and adding one radio to a device shouldn't be a big deal.


It's also interesting to see Huawei and NTT Docomo working together on this. Huawei has never won a major network contract from Docomo and isn't even a part of its 5G trials, so the most important thing here could just be Huawei being able to hook up with a fresh tier 1 operator on a project with some potential.
sowen557 8/22/2014 | 1:50:45 PM
On the floor! Japanese and Chinese working together?  Call the UN!
sarahthomas1011 8/22/2014 | 1:44:13 PM
LTE-rUde? And, Heavy Reading analyst Gabriel Brown points out that "the concern WiFi people have is the lack of "politeness" in LTE-U, as it is currently presented. WiFi people don't want to become 2nd class users of unlicensed spectrum."

Sounds like this is something Huawei is still working on addressing. It's a big challenge.
sarahthomas1011 8/22/2014 | 1:43:14 PM
network management considerations Some good insight on the demo from Current Analysis analyst Ed Gubbins:

"This announcement focuses on the idea of LTE-U offering more capacity than WiFi. That's fine to help prove out the case for how LTE-U compares to WiFi in terms of meeting the capacity need. But I think for operators considering this, that extra capacity over and above WiFi is probably not the top selling point. A more compelling part of the value proposition might lie in being able to manage LTE and LTE-U together, from the same RAN infrastructure and management systems, instead of using something like ANDSF to bridge cellular and WiFi. Though WiFi is integrated in a lot of small cells, in many cases, operators might be looking at separate base stations and WiFi access points, too, which adds to the operational management complexity.

On the other hand, there's a lot of WiFi already deployed, and it enjoys more device support than LTE does. Also, if you have to address/manage a converged RAN/WiFi world anyway, simply because of the realities of the existing market and user expectations, then maybe you'd be less enthusiastic about LTE-U, because it wouldn't necessarily free you from that complexity.

So there are considerations on all sides. Maybe more than anything, this announcement shows interest from a major operator in LTE-U, which, along with interest from others, could help drive the technology and its ecosystem"

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