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optical Mike 12/5/2012 | 3:16:17 PM
re: PON: The Dream Is Alive

Is it O.K. to remove the plug yet?
dietaryfiber 12/4/2012 | 7:40:56 PM
re: PON: The Dream Is Alive Couple things to be clear about.

1 - If the RBOCs have to unbundle PON, it will NEVER happen.

2 - The State PUCs will not allow mass RBOC deployment until PON costs are at or very near copper costs. The cable costs the same, the equipment does not.

PON has many years to go to becoming a mainstream technology. You can assume all of these startups will go bust before it does.

dietary fiber
big daddy 12/4/2012 | 7:40:47 PM
re: PON: The Dream Is Alive Thanks for checking in, Senator Hollings.
optical Mike 12/4/2012 | 7:40:42 PM
re: PON: The Dream Is Alive Do some research and look at the price of deploying a FTTH system today compared to HFC.
Copper can't compete as far as bandwidth is concerned, and the gap is closing as far as price

The PON is already becoming mainstream technology
rjmcmahon 12/4/2012 | 7:40:40 PM
re: PON: The Dream Is Alive Do some research and look at the price of deploying an FTTH system today compared to HFC.
___________________________________________

What's the price for a cable company to extend
their HFC to the home? (I assume they would use the cheapest fiber technology as well) What are the barriers (regulatory or economic) to them doing this?

-Bob

Bob



jimmy 12/4/2012 | 7:40:39 PM
re: PON: The Dream Is Alive Hi, I'm from the phone company and I'm here to plow up your lawn.
redbull 12/4/2012 | 7:40:38 PM
re: PON: The Dream Is Alive OR:

1. Hi, I'm from the sprinkler company and I'm here to install your irrigation system and plow up your lawn.

2. Hi, I'm from the cable company and I'm here to replace your cable drop and plow up your lawn.

3. Hi, I'm electrical guy and I'm here to put in a new lamp post and plow up your lawn.

The bottom line is that it happens all the time --at least in my neighborhood. For big time broadband access, dig away, pal.
redbull 12/4/2012 | 7:40:38 PM
re: PON: The Dream Is Alive OR:

1. Hi, I'm from the sprinkler company and I'm here to install your irrigation system and plow up your lawn.

2. Hi, I'm from the cable company and I'm here to replace your cable drop and plow up your lawn.

3. Hi, I'm electrical guy and I'm here to put in a new lamp post and plow up your lawn.

The bottom line is that it happens all the time --at least in my neighborhood. For big time broadband access, dig away, pal.
optical Mike 12/4/2012 | 7:40:30 PM
re: PON: The Dream Is Alive Hi, I'm from the gas company I'm going to bring this fiber to your house and I don't even have to plow up your yard!
vlui 12/4/2012 | 7:40:23 PM
re: PON: The Dream Is Alive The idea of PON maybe a leading option today for FTTH, but it is hardly mainstream. This goes back to some relevant discussion about a month ago on the Worldwide Packet article. The barriers are not just about standards becoming finalized. It has to do with :
- when the phone guys and cable guys decide they can coexist in one same infrastructure so to benefit from fiber and the idea of true integrated service network, which will not happen any time soon
- RBOCs digging up your lawn to replace the copper (in a massive scale), which is not likely to happen. By the time that happens, someone may have figured out how to squeeze a lot more out of copper, stretch the distance, etc. Even if YOU let the guys dig up your lawn, your neighbors may not, nor your city municipality, nor PUC... Bureaucracy, is it not? So don't expect FTTH/PON to be at your home in your life time, unless you move to a new neighborhood where you know will have it. It's not just a cost and disruption issue on the RBOC/CATV's side. New housing communities are the only logical place for this. And it has to be done in a grand scale in order to benefit from the economy of scale. Digging up copper or hanging new fiber on utility poles aren't going to do it.
- Community and home builders also are not necessarily comfortable about having only fiber in the ground. Maybe some. In the end there's still your copper and HFC.
- In the example of RBOC, they'll still offer you whatever version of DSL over fiber at similar bandwidth, (who knows maybe still cap you at 128k upstream...) incremental improvement in coverage because of the above issues. So they make the bucks and everyone else still suffer. Despite the economy, new bandwidth-hogging services will continue to emerge, and what you get may still not be fast enough. Will they ever get it?

So rather than PON being mainstream any time soon, perhaps the business and technology model and strategy for anything-over-fiber have to be different but more basic?
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