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allrounder 12/4/2012 | 7:45:15 PM
re: Nortel: Can This Company Be Saved? I got wrong understanding of my message. When I said "like Nortel's passport...", in English it was just an example. That didn't appoint you as a Nortel employee. You could still work for Ciena or Lucent.

Lopez 12/4/2012 | 7:45:15 PM
re: Nortel: Can This Company Be Saved? I can recall something of this. We had two consultants who were supposedly helping a team come up to speed on a new technology. To assess the team they asked some questions about the area. One of my senior colleagues was going through the process. He answered the question of how to ensure that only one object can be instantiated from a class by saying that the singleton pattern should be used. He was marked as incorrect and told that a class variable should be used instead. - no kidding. He was told to keep his mouth shut since he didnGÇÖt grasp the basics and let the consultants lead the project.

I had to code something at NT once that required that a single instance of an object be created, so I used the Singleton pattern since it was so obvious. Anyway, later on I get hammered from "senior" people for this "confusing" code. If forget exactly how they got me to change it, but I believe they wanted a class variable used. Anyway, crap like this where "senior" designers are too stubborn to change their ways, or to unambitious to keep up with the current state of software engineering is a real drain on moral.

Actually, a lot of my time at NT I wondered why we were using C++, when most people were still coding in C.

allrounder 12/4/2012 | 7:45:14 PM
re: Nortel: Can This Company Be Saved? Actually, a lot of my time at NT I wondered why we were using C++, when most people were still coding in C.

------------------------------------------------

In Cisco, C++ is prohibited in some projects if in all. C is the choice. In other San Jose startups, you are fired or condemned if you write in C++. That's the fact.
allrounder 12/4/2012 | 7:45:14 PM
re: Nortel: Can This Company Be Saved? Your interpretation was wrong. I suggest you go back to read each of my messages. I did point out Cisco did test what you called "senior skills" in a smart way.

Grasp the point before you debate so that you don't just repeat the same things for a thousand times.

By the way, Cisco did ask the projects you worked on and techinal issues you encountered. I mentioned it was a 6-hour interview.

Please read befoe you put fingers on keyboard.
allrounder 12/4/2012 | 7:45:13 PM
re: Nortel: Can This Company Be Saved? In Cisco, C++ is prohibited in some projects if in all.

should have read "if NOT in all"
asmo 12/4/2012 | 7:45:13 PM
re: Nortel: Can This Company Be Saved? Now there is a good subject for an argument embedded 'C++'.

C++ is great when you have a bunch of skilled engineers that understand embedded systems and understand C++. But in reality getting skilled people in 'C' is difficult.

Although you can use C++ as a 'better C' and limit the language constructs that may be used and still get some of the benefits of the language without exposing a project to the potential risks of letting non-experienced people 'play' with all the powerful features of the language. Been there done that.

Could be worse, you could decide to use Java in an embedded system that has some real-time requirements. Get a lot of 'C' programmers and let them loose on developing a huge system with leading bleeding edge unproven technology. (Btw, how is the project called 'Equinox' doing in Nortel any way? ;)

Asmo
Lopez 12/4/2012 | 7:45:13 PM
re: Nortel: Can This Company Be Saved? In Cisco, C++ is prohibited in some projects if in all. C is the choice. In other San Jose startups, you are fired or condemned if you write in C++. That's the fact.

Which is a shame, because proper OO coding can really simplify code, and does not incur the performance penalty that everyone thinks. I guess the problem is that few people actually know how to do OO programming, and poor OO coding can actually make things worse.
asmo 12/4/2012 | 7:45:13 PM
re: Nortel: Can This Company Be Saved? dljvjbsl,

you are stating that you find in your experience that 'soft-skills' questions are valuable when interviewing people. Fair enough, no argument there.

Those of us that have experienced Nortel interviews and Cisco interviews are saying that the Nortel interview process in inadequate as it lacks testing basic technical knowledge and seems to concentrate solely on 'touchy-feely' questions that can easily be answered with someone who can 'talk-the-talk'.

I'm not saying all 'touchy-feely' questions are useless in an interview. I'm not disagreeing with the statement that appropriate 'touch-feely' questions can be used to assess an experienced engineers abilities.

Put simply the Nortel interview process does not filter the good from the bad, it has allowed non-capable people to climb onboard Nortel and hang-on for a free ride.

Asmo
opticguy 12/4/2012 | 7:45:11 PM
re: Nortel: Can This Company Be Saved? Nortel future !!!!! Any comment for the following article ?

http://www.nwfusion.com/news/2...
nonobvious 12/4/2012 | 7:45:10 PM
re: Nortel: Can This Company Be Saved? > I short

Sorry to hear that, but it does explain a lot.
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