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OpticalZoo 12/4/2012 | 10:09:42 PM
re: Laid Off, and Leaving Telecom The Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act

It requires a 60 day notice to layoffs.

The real question is employment loss:
The term "employment loss" means:


(1) An employment termination, other than a discharge for cause, voluntary departure, or retirement;

(2) a layoff exceeding 6 months; or

(3) a reduction in an employee's hours of work of more than 50% in each month of any 6-month period.

There are some exemptions though.

The exceptions to 60-day notice are:
(1) Faltering company. This exception, to be narrowly construed, covers situations where a company has sought new capital or business in order to stay open and where giving notice would ruin the opportunity to get the new capital or business, and applies only to plant closings;


(2) unforeseeable business circumstances. This exception applies to closings and layoffs that are caused by business circumstances that were not reasonably foreseeable at the time notice would otherwise have been required; and


(3) Natural disaster. This applies where a closing or layoff is the direct result of a natural disaster, such as a flood, earthquake, drought or storm.


If an employer provides less than 60 days advance notice of a closing or layoff and relies on one of these three exceptions, the employer bears the burden of proof that the conditions for the exception have been met. The employer also must give as much notice as is practicable. When the notices are given, they must include a brief statement of the reason for reducing the notice period in addition to the items required in notices.

http://www.doleta.gov/programs...
dsb 12/4/2012 | 10:09:42 PM
re: Laid Off, and Leaving Telecom Wednesday July 3, 4:53 am Eastern Time
Reuters Company News
INTERVIEW-India's tech capital sees 60 pct export growth

By Anshuman Daga

BANGALORE, July 3 (Reuters) - India's computer industry is booming despite a slowdown in IT sales worldwide, and its technology capital Bangalore is leading the charge.

The southern state of Karnataka, whose capital is Bangalore, aims to boost exports of software and allied services by 60 percent this fiscal year, twice the expected Indian growth rate of 30 percent.
ADVERTISEMENT



Vivek Kulkarni, information technology secretary in the Karnataka state government, told Reuters that most of the fresh impetus to growth was coming from U.S. technology firms, which are rapidly moving back-office functions to India amid a sectoral slowdown overseas.

These are companies which have tested the Indian waters as customers of software provided by armies of relatively low-paid programmers. Now, they are beginning to outsource activities like accounting and bill processing.

"While the traditional software exports continues to grow, we are seeing big investments coming into IT-enabled services," Kulkarni said in an interview late on Tuesday.

Bangalore, India's "Silicon Valley," houses software centres for more than 1,000 high-tech companies including computer giant IBM (NYSE:IBM - News), chip maker Texas Instruments (NYSE:TXN - News) and top Chinese telecoms gear maker Huawei Technologies.

These have been joined lately by companies from other sectors including media titan AOL Time-Warner Inc (NYSE:AOL - News), the world's second-largest reinsurer Swiss Re and banking group HSBC (London:HSBA.L - News).

Bangalore reported exports of about $2.0 billion in the year to March, up 33 percent from the previous year, accounting for more than 95 percent of the state's IT exports.

Kulkarni said AOL Time-Warner recently leased six floors of office space for back-office work at International Tech Park, Bangalore's nifty showcase for the tech sector.

DOMESTIC GIANTS DIVERSIFY

Kulkarni said Bangalore continues to attract one new foreign technology firm every week, a trend seen over the last two years.

At the same time, domestic software giants such as Wipro (Bombay:WIPR.BO - News) and Infosys Technologies (Bombay:INFY.BO - News) have added back-office work, leveraging their existing sales engine and contacts.

Business process outsourcing (BPO), an omnibus expression for an array of back-office services, is delivered remotely through high-speed telecoms links, which are increasingly cheaper.

Building on India's proven software skills, foreign firms are also flocking to set up centres to process financial claims, payroll data and build customer support desks. Commerce and English language graduates are in great demand.

While the technology sector has been hit worldwide, accompanying cost-cuttting measures are a boon for Bangalore.

"The majority of the companies in U.S. are under cost pressure and that's why we expect them to continue to move into India, which offers them a ready-made talent pool," Kulkarni said.

"Cost obviously is the driving force but that doesn't mean that quality is being compromised," he said.

In Bangalore, software engineers can be hired for about $200 per month, nearly one-tenth of what it costs in the United States. The city of about 5.5 million people is home to over 120,000 IT workers.

Bangalore, named by the United Nations last year among a handful of world-class technology hubs, accounted for a fourth of India's $7.5 billion IT exports in the year to March.
sigint 12/4/2012 | 10:09:40 PM
re: Laid Off, and Leaving Telecom In Bangalore, software engineers can be hired for about $200 per month, nearly one-tenth of what it costs in the United States. The city of about 5.5 million people is home to over 120,000 IT workers.
__________________________________________________

I don't think it would be possible to get a well-qualified and experienced software engineer for $200 PM, just as it won't be possible to get a similarly qualified engineer in the US for $2000. It would cost more like $1200 to get an engineer from a good college with about 4 years experience.
optblues 12/4/2012 | 10:09:38 PM
re: Laid Off, and Leaving Telecom Excellent post. I'm going to work on my beer dispensing hat with built in cell phone immediately. :)
Seriously, I would agree with the assessment that we need to invent a service that most of the average people would use, but I donG«÷t think it is necessarily tied to the small town Joe. Most of the people live in the city- but I do get your point. I think we can afford to take a leap of faith with technology, though. You know, build it and they will come type of service. Take for example cell phones. When they first came out, they were for the business people only. Now everyone has one, since the prices dropped. Why couldnG«÷t the same be true for the PDA? I think it will happen where the PDA, or some morph of it, will be just as ubiquitous as the cell phone.
Well, lets here it people. What are some applications that everyday people can use that will drive revenue and traffic?
=================
Fiber Lord wrote:
The solution is equally simple. You must understand what drives the industry and stimulate it. It is not VCs, not CEOs, not government regulators and certainly not technology. It is everyday " Joe Six-packs" living in small town America- the type of person who is not at all like the average high tech worker. We have to go to those small towns; we have to think like those people. And no, they do not make $200,000 a year, fly on business trips all the time, and own PDAs.
netskeptic 12/4/2012 | 10:09:37 PM
re: Laid Off, and Leaving Telecom > Seriously, I would agree with the assessment
> that we need to invent a service that most of
> the average people would use,

Average people read news on the net, send e-mails, shop, listen to music etc. The problem is that most of these services are provided below the cost.

So, the solution is simple and it will happen without divine intervention of any kind, providers which will be still standing when the dust settles (when all borrowed money will be burnt out in bancrupcies) will be able to raise prices above the costs. Naturally, with rising prices demand will shrink, but this is life, it is time to get use to it.

Thanks,

Netskeptic

Fiber Lord 12/4/2012 | 10:09:36 PM
re: Laid Off, and Leaving Telecom Thank you for the compliment.

I must point out that 25% of the population of the US lives in towns less than 10,000 people. 4,000,000 businesses are in those towns. Small businesses are the high margin telco customer.

And, those small towns elect the representatives with the most seniority and those representatives dominate the state and federal legislatures. You will never get a government concensus on broadband until the industry addresses the small town fear that the Internet will wipe out main street. It may only be a fear, but the fear of radiation poisoning wiped out the nuclear power industry twenty years ago, and the fear of biotechnology is dogging the genetically altered seed business. That fear must be addressed for there to be progress or the industry could go the way of the nuclear industry.
secretIdentity 12/4/2012 | 10:09:36 PM
re: Laid Off, and Leaving Telecom The other side of the coin, is to reduce costs so that current prices result in a profit. Surely, that must be possible... I don't see why not.
netskeptic 12/4/2012 | 10:09:35 PM
re: Laid Off, and Leaving Telecom > The other side of the coin, is to reduce costs
> so that current prices result in a profit.
> Surely, that must be possible... I don't see
> why not.

Sure, if you can offer something which reduces expenses, say by 10x then even bancrupt carrier will try to get some money and buy it from you.
The problem is I did not see anything like that being offered or even hyped.

Thanks,

Netskeptic
lightpimp 12/4/2012 | 10:09:34 PM
re: Laid Off, and Leaving Telecom For Telecom, its going to get much worse before it gets better unfortunately. For those that think that WCOM was the final nail in the coffin for this industry, that was only the beginning for much worse to come. This industry was so inflated for years that it was only a matter of time before that air needed to be deflated from the bubble. Now that the MAJOR IXCs are going BK, there are very few customers to chase and they are consistantly chopping CAPEX budgets as each quarter passes on by.

Folks, we are back in 1929 just as the great railroad industry rose to the heathen and collaped under the pressure of easy monetary policy in a deflationary environment. The majority of those railroad companies died and withered away into the abyss. The workers found something else to do for survival, same is happening for the telecom industry.
rjmcmahon 12/4/2012 | 10:09:34 PM
re: Laid Off, and Leaving Telecom The history of the Empire State Building may give some insights into the future of bandwidth businesses. This great building, completed under budget (due to the Great Depression) and in record time of 18 mos, only had 20% occupancy on its opening in 1931. It took many, many years to fill the building which never secured large anchor tenants but rather lots of smaller tenants generate the revenue.

Bandwidth businesses that transition to a service industry and enable these "smaller tenants" will be positioning themselves for long term viability. They'll need to learn how to support IT outsourcing amongst many other value added services. It's not about raising prices but rather about enabling productivity.

PS. The Technet "moon shot" promoters may do well to ask themselves the question, not who was first to step on the moon, but rather, who was last to leave it? Listen to his words from 1972.

http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/...

http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/...

Let us hope our communicatios industry doesn't take a multi-generation hiatus but rather can transition to its real purpose of enabling our participation and the knowledge diffusion our societies depend upon.
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