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kaka
kaka
12/5/2012 | 5:12:04 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


The stand made by Hu could be legitimate but I had the following comments:


Investing in a telecom infrastructure is strategic and one needs to have processes and mechanisms to protect oneself. Just having a willingness to have your products undergo scrutiny is insufficient to get access to the market. Huawei is a privately held company based in China (notorious for IP theft) with no transparency and accountability. How can a company which is not public expect to gain access to the world's biggest market.&nbsp;


In fact they should have a law that prohibits companies to buy strategic investments from non-public companies.


&nbsp;


&nbsp;

kaka
kaka
12/5/2012 | 5:12:04 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


The stand made by Hu could be legitimate but I had the following comments:


Investing in a telecom infrastructure is strategic and one needs to have processes and mechanisms to protect oneself. Just having a willingness to have your products undergo scrutiny is insufficient to get access to the market. Huawei is a privately held company based in China (notorious for IP theft) with no transparency and accountability. How can a company which is not public expect to gain access to the world's biggest market.&nbsp;


In fact they should have a law that prohibits companies to buy strategic investments from non-public companies.


&nbsp;


&nbsp;

BigBro
BigBro
12/5/2012 | 5:12:03 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


1. What makes you think that the NSA doesn't already have all the source code/schematics/... for Huawei products? ;)


2. What makes you think that all the foreign nationals working as engineers at U.S. companies in the U.S. are trustworthy? For that matter, that U.S. citizens are above and beyond being blackmailed/bribed/... by foreign entities?

paolo.franzoi
paolo.franzoi
12/5/2012 | 5:12:01 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


bigbro,


1. I hope they do, but the barrier to getting that information will be higher than it is for US based firms.


2. I don't believe they are clean necessarily, but it is a lower bar to risk then having products designed completely in the domain of a foreign government.


seven


&nbsp;

Telecomguy0704
Telecomguy0704
12/5/2012 | 5:11:59 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US

A note for LTE/4G Operators, from the eNB, it&rsquo;s quite easily to hack into EPC nodes. Once got into the S-GW/P-GW nodes, all data can be tapped. Selected important data from EPC nodes can also be collected and embedded into various logs through hidden backdoor code and be sent via the e-UTRAN access.

&nbsp;

&nbsp;In the open letter, it mentioned about the army (PLA), but the fact is, in China, the Communist Party of China (CPC) controls everything. PLA is only an apparatus of the CPC. If one ever lived in China, one would know that most political/business deals and decision making process are opaque and shrouded in secrecy mode.

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

Other interesting links and articles about CPC, Huawei might be worth reading are shown below.&nbsp;

&nbsp;

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2007-07/10/content_6142022.htm


&ldquo;Primary Party organizations are formed in China's mainland enterprises, rural areas, government departments, schools, scientific research institutes, communities, mass organizations, intermediaries, companies of the People's Liberation Army and other basic units, where there are at least three full Party members.&rdquo;

------

<h1 style="margin: auto 0in;">ACG Research on Huawei, Chinese business culture and the Art of War</h1>
<h1 style="margin: auto 0in;">http://searchtelecom.techtarget.com/feature/ACG-Research-on-Huawei-Chinese-business-culture-and-the-Art-of-War?asrc=EM_USC_13048542&amp;track=NL-854&amp;ad=804294</h1>
<h1 style="margin: auto 0in;">&nbsp;</h1>
<h1 style="margin: auto 0in;">ACG Research on Huawei vs. network equipment vendors </h1>
<h1 style="margin: auto 0in;">http://searchtelecom.techtarget.com/feature/ACG-Research-on-Huawei-vs-network-equipment-vendors</h1>
<h1 style="margin: auto 0in;">&nbsp;</h1>

John Zhao
John Zhao
12/5/2012 | 5:11:57 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


American - Sux

jeanva
jeanva
12/5/2012 | 5:11:56 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


the interest rate of load is not known,&nbsp;

Telecomguy0704
Telecomguy0704
12/5/2012 | 5:11:54 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


Sprint has a very good Network Security expert team and below is the outcome selection of their 4G network upgrade infrastructure vendors. To me, Sprint management team is truly visionary, as they have foreseen the potential problem ahead.

Report: Sprint excludes Huawei, ZTE from network project over security concerns

http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/report-sprint-excludes-huawei-zte-bids-network-project/2010-11-05

I believe that we have a right to be concerned and knowing that our communication network infrastructure is so critically important to our day-to-day lives.

How could we allow a PRIVATE company from a Communist Party controlled country (like China) to build and to influent/control our communication network infrastructure; especially, anything to do with the LTE/4G networks?

As they said "Vision is not seeing as they are, but as they will be.".

Thank you all, for listening.


billy_fold
billy_fold
12/5/2012 | 5:11:53 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


John,


Get a clue; buy one if you have to.


-billy

photon2
photon2
12/5/2012 | 5:11:40 PM
re: Huawei's Open Letter to the US


I think we have to all remember that all equipment is 'hackable', back doors are hard to find and exist in all sorts of routers and optical equipment no matter where they are placed or what country they reside in.


Now, having said that, allowing any one vendor too much leverage in any network for any reason despite the extent they prove their 'compliance' (btw, NSN is compliant now only because of all the slush $ they got caught spending), is not a likely safe route.&nbsp;


Given that much of our appliances today and tomorrow come from China, we'll have to let go of some of these fears.&nbsp; Fact is, if Huawei hadn't been 'caught' doing things in some networks this might be easier for them.


P2

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