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stephencooke
stephencooke
12/5/2012 | 4:05:13 AM
re: Google, EarthLink Team for SF WiFi
Oops, got x and y backwards. y (the down direction) is generally much bigger than x (the up direction).

Steve.
stephencooke
stephencooke
12/5/2012 | 4:05:13 AM
re: Google, EarthLink Team for SF WiFi
Seven,

What you pay for is not actually bandwidth. Read your contract with your supplier. "unlimited" is defined by various ISPs differently but tend to say that you are allowed xGBs (note that it is not GB/s) per month up and yGBs down. x is generally greater than y. Some carriers, and media types, calculate the oversubscription ratio as the max bandwidth 24/7/month divided by the number of subscribers on the line. This ends up being a big number of bits.

Each carrier is different but I am sure they apply a bell curve to the numbers vs. time of day to arrive at the numbers in your contract but it is NOT guaranteed bandwidth.

Steve.
paolo.franzoi
paolo.franzoi
12/5/2012 | 4:05:13 AM
re: Google, EarthLink Team for SF WiFi

Stephen,

If there is no congestion, why would anybody limit my access below the bit rate clocked at the port.

Beyond that, oversubscription ratios should (and are not I agree) be part of the agreement.

seven
stephencooke
stephencooke
12/5/2012 | 4:05:12 AM
re: Google, EarthLink Team for SF WiFi
Seven,

I don't imagine that anyone would limit your access in that situation; but I would expect that they would charge it against the maximum amounts listed in your contract. Some carriers also list penalties for exceeding the max traffic bounds. For example BT used to reduce the clock rate on the port once the limits were exceeded, at no extra charge, until the end of the month when it was reset. In many corporate contracts there is actually a monetary penalty where you pay $AAA for an extra qGB which is at a higer rate than your regular contract. If you do this more than once you may get a call from an account rep asking if you would like to increase your base contract.

Steve.
paolo.franzoi
paolo.franzoi
12/5/2012 | 4:05:12 AM
re: Google, EarthLink Team for SF WiFi

Stephen,

If there is no congestion, why would anybody limit my access below the bit rate clocked at the port.

Beyond that, oversubscription ratios should (and are not I agree) be part of the agreement.

seven
opticalwatcher
opticalwatcher
12/5/2012 | 4:05:11 AM
re: Google, EarthLink Team for SF WiFi
I checked the Corpus Christi website and the coverage doesn't look so good. Plus there is this statement:

"Though free access is currently provided, the City plans to charge an affordable rate to cover ongoing implementation and support costs."

It doesn't really compare to what's being planned in SF and Philadelphia.
paolo.franzoi
paolo.franzoi
12/5/2012 | 4:05:11 AM
re: Google, EarthLink Team for SF WiFi

That is BT and is a business service.

In the residential case, all that is listed is a port rate. So, if I find a way to offer the maximum port rate at all times the network should accept my portion of the traffic. Now if there is congestion, I should get my fair share of the bandwidth right? It should not matter that an hour ago, when there was no congestion that I still offered maximum bandwidth.

seven
paolo.franzoi
paolo.franzoi
12/5/2012 | 4:05:11 AM
re: Google, EarthLink Team for SF WiFi

That is BT and is a business service.

In the residential case, all that is listed is a port rate. So, if I find a way to offer the maximum port rate at all times the network should accept my portion of the traffic. Now if there is congestion, I should get my fair share of the bandwidth right? It should not matter that an hour ago, when there was no congestion that I still offered maximum bandwidth.

seven
stephencooke
stephencooke
12/5/2012 | 4:05:11 AM
re: Google, EarthLink Team for SF WiFi
Seven,

"In the residential case, all that is listed is a port rate. So, if I find a way to offer the maximum port rate at all times the network should accept my portion of the traffic. Now if there is congestion, I should get my fair share of the bandwidth right? It should not matter that an hour ago, when there was no congestion that I still offered maximum bandwidth."

I know you know the difference between what is listed (ie: marketing) and what is in the T's & C's (ie: what you actually pay for). Put yourself in the carrier's seat and figure out how you would charge for (ie: generate revenue) and how you would gain customers for (ie: marketing) your DSL service. It is not as easy as you might think.

"So, if I find a way to offer the maximum port rate at all times" = oversubscription rate of 1:1 (ie: no oversubscription, no stat muxing).

"Now if there is congestion, I should get my fair share of the bandwidth right?" Fairness has nothing to do with it. It has everything to do with what you actually pay for (ie: the T's & C's).

Steve.
paolo.franzoi
paolo.franzoi
12/5/2012 | 4:05:10 AM
re: Google, EarthLink Team for SF WiFi

chip,

Yes, I know it is silly. I also recognize sarcasm. Yes, I know the game that is being played. I am actually okay with the game to a certain point. I expect my connection to be oversubscribed. I agree that this ought to be a published and testable phenomenon, as it would give us some objective idea of whose service is actually better.

See, I actually think paying for QoS is okay. It is just I think there ought to be truth in advertising.

seven
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