& cplSiteName &
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
<<   <   Page 2 / 10   >   >>
spelurker
spelurker
12/5/2012 | 3:35:35 PM
re: FCC's Martin Is Ready to Pounce
> I would think Universities would claim more of a business, status,
> where your right to use the their services for personal use is limited
> to educational related topics with limited personal use.

Most university IT departments make you read their "permitted uses" policy before they allow you on the network. I'm not sure if it's a legally binding agreement, but it's got to count for something.
paolo.franzoi
paolo.franzoi
12/5/2012 | 3:35:35 PM
re: FCC's Martin Is Ready to Pounce

fg,

My only point would be that the business and technical situation has changed since CI-2 and would now have to be applied to wireless and cable as well as telco. It is simply silly to argue that cable and telcos don't compete residential voice and broadband access in many markets.

seven
stephencooke
stephencooke
12/5/2012 | 3:35:34 PM
re: FCC's Martin Is Ready to Pounce
Hi,

Until recently I had no idea what P2P actually meant to a network. I thought that basically someone initiated a session to obtain some content, probably via ftp and some P2P service found that content for you.

It turns out, to my surprise, that what actually happens is that your P2P session spawns potentially thousands of sessions to acquire the desired content, faster. Basically the original P2P session looks for the content and generates sessions with everywhere it can reach that has that content. It doesn't matter if you have a really fast connection to your neighbour who has the desired content, the P2P session will look around the world (if it has sufficient access) to simultaneously download multiple pieces of that content and re-assemble it once it has all arrived.

Rogers in Canada did some experiments where they doubled the capacity of a congested node to see if this would clear the congestion. It did... for about 12 seconds. That new, twice as large, node was again congested. The traffic that used up the entire amount of the doubled bandwidth was P2P.

There is a way to deal with this: create different classes of service and charge real money for the higher classes of service. P2P, bit torrent, etc. would then not be able to interrupt VoIP or streaming HD video or Seven's gaming. Not a nice answer but necessary.

Steve.
Mark Seery
Mark Seery
12/5/2012 | 3:35:33 PM
re: FCC's Martin Is Ready to Pounce
Every transport infrastructure in America has the equivalent of common carriage and/or contract carriage. The general principle that a carrier should not be able to refuse carriage if there is available capacity and should charge a standard rate is a principle that we seem to come back to time and time again in transport infrastructures. It passes the "fairness" test and also has utility for businesses making investment decisions and planning for the future.

However, it is worth noting a) that whatever the FCC did in 2005 was only possible because of how the Supreme Court has in modern times interpreted the power of executive agencies+the ambiguity of instructions that have been given to the FCC by congress and b) the conditions around common carriage, dominant carrier, and the labrinyth of sticks and carrots to different modes of communication infrastructure had become so convoluted as to be deserving of being thrown away in favor of a clearer, simpler, carrier neutral, technology neutral, workable approach to common sense, common carriage - anything else is not about achieving the goals of common carriage it is usually about something else, usually someone's idea of what is good for overturning one business interest in favor of another (i.e. allowing one business to try and achieve an advantage over another business through the regulatory process) - which is how we end up with a convoluted mess in the first place instead of just sticking to simple, clear, well understood, and well proven principles.
Jeff Baumgartner
Jeff Baumgartner
12/5/2012 | 3:35:33 PM
re: FCC's Martin Is Ready to Pounce
So far: Commissioners Adelstein and Copps have issued statements in favor of sanctions against Comcast
Jeff Baumgartner
Jeff Baumgartner
12/5/2012 | 3:35:32 PM
re: FCC's Martin Is Ready to Pounce
More from McDowell: record shows "FCC does not know what Comcast did or did not do...evidence is thin and conflicting."
Jeff Baumgartner
Jeff Baumgartner
12/5/2012 | 3:35:32 PM
re: FCC's Martin Is Ready to Pounce
FCC Commish McDowell: also looks to be dissenting at the start. no surprise, since he has already telegraphed his position: http://www.washingtonpost.com/...
Jeff Baumgartner
Jeff Baumgartner
12/5/2012 | 3:35:32 PM
re: FCC's Martin Is Ready to Pounce
FCC commish Deborah Taylor Tate opening comment: still "not persuaded" thinks best way to fulfull fcc duty would be as role of mediator and facilitate agreements among INternet community rather than issuing mandates.
Jeff Baumgartner
Jeff Baumgartner
12/5/2012 | 3:35:31 PM
re: FCC's Martin Is Ready to Pounce
3-2 in favor of action. Item adopted at 11:48 a.m. ET.
Jeff Baumgartner
Jeff Baumgartner
12/5/2012 | 3:35:31 PM
re: FCC's Martin Is Ready to Pounce
FCC Chairman Martin: today's order ensures "bad actors will end up being punished."
<<   <   Page 2 / 10   >   >>


Featured Video
Upcoming Live Events
October 22, 2019, Los Angeles, CA
November 5, 2019, London, England
November 7, 2019, London, UK
November 14, 2019, Maritim Hotel, Berlin
December 3-5, 2019, Vienna, Austria
December 3, 2019, New York, New York
March 16-18, 2020, Embassy Suites, Denver, Colorado
May 18-20, 2020, Irving Convention Center, Dallas, TX
All Upcoming Live Events