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mr zippy
mr zippy
12/5/2012 | 1:42:36 AM
re: Carriers Weigh Savings With Cisco CRS-1
At the launch event yesterday for its CRS-1 router, Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO - message board) demonstrated an array of futuristic services that its new, massively scaleable box will enable telcos to provide -- from videoconferencing to multiplayer gaming (see Cisco Unveils the HFR ).

Selling a routing plaform by demonstrating multiplayer games and video conferencing ! What is the world coming too ?

Surely Cisco don't need to put on a floorshow like this to show how good their new router is ? It used to be all about bitrates per second, packets per second etc. at new product launches, now its all about games and videoconferencing.

It sounds like Cisco know the market they are targetting, and it seems to be PHBs only.

kapooranupam
kapooranupam
12/5/2012 | 1:42:32 AM
re: Carriers Weigh Savings With Cisco CRS-1
HFR = Huge Fast Router. doesn't sound very nice now does it ?
Tony Li
Tony Li
12/5/2012 | 1:42:30 AM
re: Carriers Weigh Savings With Cisco CRS-1

Well, if they did allow for it, I'm SURE that Cisco marketing would have picked up on it and used it. So I think that it's fair to assume that 72 chassis is a strict upper bound.

Tony
ragho
ragho
12/5/2012 | 1:42:30 AM
re: Carriers Weigh Savings With Cisco CRS-1

Does this box use any passive fiber in the midplane, or is it all copper?. I recall that Juniper wanted to go the VCSEL way to smoothly raise bitrates on the midplane but VCSEL was not (and still isn't) mature and cost effective.

Let's forget the 100% YOY growth in the math. Chambers claims that this is more like 400-500% (yes, yes). How the heck can he deliver that kind of fabric growth without advancing to newer materials and technology?. More precisely, can he do this without changing the midplane in the next n years?.

The CRS-1 numbers do boggle me. On Cisco's website, the OC768c I/O card occupies a single slot which is quite fascinating, given the amount of power, serdes real estate, plus the number of pins to drive it into the fabric (recall that there most folks are doing 4x2.5Gbps serdes to do 10G per line card). Is there a magic hamster doing line rate work?. Is it Mexican?.
Tony Li
Tony Li
12/5/2012 | 1:42:29 AM
re: Carriers Weigh Savings With Cisco CRS-1

I would be truly surprised if they were NOT using a VCSEL for interconnection between the line card chassis and the fabric chassis. But within the respective chassis, I would assume that they're using copper for the backplane. At least that would be consistent with their design approach. Anyone who knows definitively should speak up.

Changing the midplane over time is not necessary. One of the nice aspects about such a system is that they can produce improvements to the line card chassis and, if they left the right hooks in place, can make that part of the system by maintaining the interface to the switch fabric.

Doing 40Gb/s per slot is not new. The T640 and
8812 have been doing this for years now. In fact, the OC-768 is probably easier to do than 4xOC-192, just because of the space savings from modular boards and reduced optics footprint.

Tony
mr zippy
mr zippy
12/5/2012 | 1:42:29 AM
re: Carriers Weigh Savings With Cisco CRS-1
What happened to the HFR name?

Internal name, much like BFR (from memory) was the internal name for the GSRs.

What did that stand for anyway?

As somebody mentioned before, in polite company, Huge Fast Router.

In less polite company, the F stands for a very common expletive, probably what you might use if you wanted to shorten "fire truck".
turing
turing
12/5/2012 | 1:42:27 AM
re: Carriers Weigh Savings With Cisco CRS-1
Is it just me, or doesn't the acronym spell crash? (or curse-1)
Dindon
Dindon
12/5/2012 | 1:42:26 AM
re: Carriers Weigh Savings With Cisco CRS-1
I think Cisco had done the right think in the market, defining this new Huge Fast Router as CARRIER ROUTING SYSTEM.

All Service Provider must stop to invest in Enterprise routers, like 12K, 75xx, 76xx, etc., they must take serious decision to invest in real CARRIER ROUTER.

In the case of Cisco product line they alread have one option, CRS-1. Considering is a complete new product, like any start-up, sales cycle will be 12-24 months. Time that Cisco will stabilize the system and customer will become more confident it will delivery what Cisco promisses and will not CRaSh. Who is going to take the short term risk?

In the case of Juniper, SP has several options of real Carrier Routers that is stable for years and has more than 24 months of technology gap against competition.

Easy decision for next few months of investiment, don't you think?
arch_1
arch_1
12/5/2012 | 1:42:26 AM
re: Carriers Weigh Savings With Cisco CRS-1
Ragho said:
"The CRS-1 numbers do boggle me. On Cisco's website, the OC768c I/O card occupies a single slot which is quite fascinating, given the amount of power, serdes real estate, plus the number of pins to drive it into the fabric ..."

Well yes, but the slot itself is huge. There are only 16 slots in a full 23" rack. This means a CRS-1 slot occupies about the same volume as a 3U 19" unit.
myoptic
myoptic
12/5/2012 | 1:42:25 AM
re: Carriers Weigh Savings With Cisco CRS-1
Do you really think that Cisco has suddenly "seen the light" and decided to give up the fat revenue stream which flows from forcing customers to upgrade routers every 2-3 years and cycle through endless linecard generations? Don't be naive.

They'll make up the revenue lost on hardware churn with software license fees. With the monolithic design of IOS, it was virtually impossible for Cisco to determine what features and protocols were used. A customer pays $10K up front whether they're using the router as a simple route reflector or a 300 Gbps core router. The dirty secret about Cisco's new IOS-XR is that modularity enables Cisco to charge customers individually for every single process and function.

With IOS-XR, Cisco is making a fundamental change to a Microsoft-like business model and years from now customers who committed to the CRS-1 will look back fondly on the days when a single $10K license bought unlimited SW functionality.

my0ptic
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