& cplSiteName &
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
sgan201
sgan201
12/5/2012 | 3:16:00 PM
re: Cable Confronts Bandwidth Crunch
Read carefully.

They are admitting that they do not have enough bandwidth for more video channels. They are NOT admitting that they do not have enough bandwidth for data. In fact, if they give you more bandwidth for data, you will see more internet video as opposed to cable TV. That is NOT what they want to see happening.

Dreamer
lighten up!!
lighten up!!
12/5/2012 | 3:16:00 PM
re: Cable Confronts Bandwidth Crunch
That they they don't have enough bandwidth to serve their customers adequately. In my area service goes down to crap after about 4:30 p.m. I am fedup of calling Optimum Online whose tech goes through all the B.S. procedures, (router resets, modem boot...)except admitting that their nodes and their UBRs can't handle the traffic. I am sure I am not the only one experiencing these problems as many people admit poor service during peak hours. They then have the nerve to ask you to sign up for Voice service. What are you friggin nuts?? I can't wait for Verizon's FIOS in my neighborhood so I can tell Optimum Online to go pound salt...
stephencooke
stephencooke
12/5/2012 | 3:15:59 PM
re: Cable Confronts Bandwidth Crunch
Hi InetUID,

The bandwidth issues have more to do with the way that the cable is deployed (a single wire 'bus' for cable vs. a dedicated connection for DSL) and the way that the information (both data & TV) shares the available bandwidth on that cable.

If you would like to research this more there are a whole bunch of tutorials and standards that you can read. See DOCSIS for cable systems and DSL for phone line-based systems.

Steve.
fgoldstein
fgoldstein
12/5/2012 | 3:15:59 PM
re: Cable Confronts Bandwidth Crunch
Dreamer, the article is talking about both data (DOCSIS) and video.

Lighten, it's unlikely that the congestion is in the cable plant. Your basic DOCSIS system has 30-40 Mbps of downstream capacity. Average residential usage just isn't all that high. The typical congestion point is upstream, where a large number of DOCSIS nodes are consolidated and interconnect with the Internet backbone. Cablevision still has to pay its upstream IbSP, not to mention run a router infrastructure to get there.

The advantage that HFC operators (cablecos) have is that they already put fiber into the field. If they need more data capacity, it's an incremental change. Node splitting puts fewer subscribers on a single DOCSIS shared channel. DOCSIS 3.0 will aggregate more than 6 Mbps into a single DOCSIS stream. And they can eventually bypass the coax completely and use glass for the last leg, should it become cost-effective to do so.

The bigger limit is video capacity. HDTV takes a lot of bandwidth, and there are an awful lot of ordinary cable channels out there. The lesser-watched channels may end up migrating to video-on-demand first.
InetUID
InetUID
12/5/2012 | 3:15:59 PM
re: Cable Confronts Bandwidth Crunch
I've heard in the UK that cable is better because the 'wire' is thicker than the phone line to your house (DSL). If this is the case how come they are having bandwidth issues?
"Ill" Duce
12/5/2012 | 3:15:59 PM
re: Cable Confronts Bandwidth Crunch
If the MSO's move to an FTTH model (which I have heard outside LR,) what does that portend for the local franchise model and lack of regs? An MSO providing FTTH and MOCA is no diferent than and ILEC providing FTTH and MOCA.

What are local building codes going to say about the number of NIDs/ONU/whatevers on the side of houses, not to mention the retaliation of the ILECs.

Can the MSO's move from a regional decision making model imposed by the business structure to one of centralized planning?

AT&T and it's army of attorneys could argue that MSO's no longer get any relief from any regulation imposed on ILECs. MSO's could argue that if the ILEC's get nationwide video franchises, they should also giving them relief from local franchising.

And what pray tell of the bazillion dollars in local franchise taxes and other perqs extracted from MSOs by cities?

Smells like a heap o' pottage is cookin'
Hmmmm.

ozip
ozip
12/5/2012 | 3:15:59 PM
re: Cable Confronts Bandwidth Crunch
f...

Your right, all this talk about a bandwidth crunch is very misleading. The correct term is that some operators are experiencing a SPECTRUM CRUNCH because of increased demands of all services, data, on-demand and HD.

For further confusion, talk about DOCSIS 3.0 providing more bandwidth is also misleading, as I am sure you know. All it does in this context is provide a way of managing multiple channels combined to increase the agreegate. But to make it work, you still have to find more spectrum.


OZIP
ozip
ozip
12/5/2012 | 3:15:59 PM
re: Cable Confronts Bandwidth Crunch
Im sure that the guy from Sunflower knows what he is talking about, but with that exception the quotes are from vendors who stand to sell a lot of equipment if their claims are true.

If you going to take the position, how about support from some more credible operator sources instead of vendors peddling their wares.

OZIP
tsat
tsat
12/5/2012 | 3:15:57 PM
re: Cable Confronts Bandwidth Crunch

yes, the cable-tv cable in itself can handle more bandwidth becuase it is coaxial. Just on a physical level, it will always be able to handle more bandwidth then the twisted-pair telephone lines that carry DSL.

However, there is more to the problem than that. Typically, cable-TV cables are shared amongst many users, while a twisted-pair coming to you home is unique just to your house.

-tsat
paolo.franzoi
paolo.franzoi
12/5/2012 | 3:15:56 PM
re: Cable Confronts Bandwidth Crunch

MG,

You have an error in your statement. Downloaded content is more expensive than cable, if it is legally obtained.

Go download every episode that you receive off basic cable via iTunes. Now that is theoretical, but even with people watching 20 hours a week that would be $20 - $40/week for downloaded content.

Unless you think Youtube has suddenly made American Idol obsolete. In which case you are patently insane.

seven
Page 1 / 3   >   >>


Featured Video
Upcoming Live Events
November 5, 2019, London, England
November 7, 2019, London, UK
November 14, 2019, Maritim Hotel, Berlin
December 3-5, 2019, Vienna, Austria
December 3, 2019, New York, New York
March 16-18, 2020, Embassy Suites, Denver, Colorado
May 18-20, 2020, Irving Convention Center, Dallas, TX
All Upcoming Live Events