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Stevery 12/5/2012 | 3:05:21 PM
re: 40 GigE Could End Standards Spat One supporter of the 40-Gig standard, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, says a combined standard is necessary because of problems with the current 10-Gigabit Ethernet standard. "The IEEE came out with 10-Gigabit Ethernet and it was adopted poorly because it was envisioned poorly."

And so the solution to avoiding the 10GE fiasco is to make the next document MORE complex by incorporating 2 speeds.

Veeerrrry shrewd.
t.bogataj 12/5/2012 | 3:05:20 PM
re: 40 GigE Could End Standards Spat "In all the world, there is only room for a few computing machines."

"No one will ever need more than 640 kB of RAM."

"Who needs more than the dazzling 2400 bps?"

Sound familiar? What did market analysts say back then? Who will ever need 100 Gpbs?

Build it, and they will come.

tata, T.
Off_the_shelf 12/5/2012 | 3:05:20 PM
re: 40 GigE Could End Standards Spat The new Road to 100G Alliance (www.roadto100g.org) seems to have put their focus on what the market demands. That seems to make sense here too.

Maybe more people should be looking into this alliance and advocating this market approach. After all, 40G is on the road to 100G...
opticalwatcher 12/5/2012 | 3:05:20 PM
re: 40 GigE Could End Standards Spat "many switching vendors think a 40-Gigabit Ethernet standard would delay commercialization of 100-Gigabit Ethernet"

...only if 40 Gigabit makes more economic sense than 100 Gibabit Ethernet. Why not let the market decide if 40 or 100 Gigabit really makes sense?

Why was the 100 Gigabit speed chosen anyway? Was some tradeoff study done? Is it affordable? Does it make sense when looking at the end-to-end network and all its components? Or was it chosen, as I suspect, simply because it is 10x 10Gigabit?
tsat 12/5/2012 | 3:05:19 PM
re: 40 GigE Could End Standards Spat 40G is a reality today, in both optics and packet processing. 100G is still a long way off. If the market wants faster Ethernet quickly, 40G makes a lot of sense.

Otherwise, the world will be stuck with 10G Ethernet for several more years. It will only prolong SONET's lifespan.

-tsat
numinary 12/5/2012 | 3:05:18 PM
re: 40 GigE Could End Standards Spat There is some confusion on this message board. Currently, the folks pushing 40GbE are suggesting only a MMF (multimode fiber) and Cu (Copper) physical interface. There is a chance that a SMF (single mode fiber) 40GbE physical interface might be used, but it is unlikely to be embraced within the IEEE committee.

The 100GbE coterie is proposing Cu, MMF, & SMF physical interfaces. The 4x25G proposal has been only for SMF. Presentations have been made which suggest that the economics compare favorably -- you are welcome to use your own judgement in regards to these forward cost estimates. The 100GbE MMF proposal is likely to be a 10x10G interface both optically and electrically. It's an open question as to which MMF (40 vs. 100) rate is cheaper/bit.
Ryan Lawler 12/5/2012 | 3:05:18 PM
re: 40 GigE Could End Standards Spat Not at the IEEE meeting but still long to provide input into how you think the IEEE HSSG standards process should play out? Make your voice heard the democratic way -- through an LR poll on the subject:

http://www.lightreading.com/su...
Ryan Lawler 12/5/2012 | 3:05:18 PM
re: 40 GigE Could End Standards Spat Not at the IEEE meeting but still long to provide input into how you think the IEEE HSSG standards process should play out? Make your voice heard the democratic way -- through an LR poll on the subject:

http://www.lightreading.com/su...
tsat 12/5/2012 | 3:05:18 PM
re: 40 GigE Could End Standards Spat
Sure, it is doable. Pretty much anything is doable. But at what price?

-tsat
pavlovsdog 12/5/2012 | 3:05:18 PM
re: 40 GigE Could End Standards Spat provided standards can be established.

For example, a physical layer interface at 4x25GB using CWDM is readily doable today. All the circuitry behind it is also quite doable.

But having both 40GE and 100GE will scatter engineers and $, and jeopardize both.
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