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3G/HSPA

Mankiewich Out as AlcaLu Wireless CTO

Paul Mankiewich, the CTO for wireless products at Alcatel-Lucent (NYSE: ALU), has left the company, Light Reading has learned.

And our sources say that retirement may have been precipitated by AlcaLu's new strategy, as initiated by the company's CEO, Ben Verwaayen.

"I've been with the company for 28 years, and in that time worked with some great people and worked on some very interesting projects in which I take great pride," states Mankiewich in a prepared statement. "Now I think it's a good time to try something new. I plan to take some time off, and then expect to be moving into the next phase of my career."

The many Web biographies of Paul Mankiewich show him as having worked at Lucent, now Alcatel-Lucent, in various capacities. He's worked in nearly every technical facet of the wireless networks product group and was also "responsible for integrating Bell Labs innovation into the mobility products," according to a bio archived by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) 's Website.

Throughout his career at Lucent, as its CTO and its top Mobility Solutions technology executive, Mankiewich and his team set the technology direction for mobile, optical, switching, and data networking, working on standards, network architectures, end-to-end solutions, product strategies, and roadmaps.

AlcaLu sources say the company will appoint a replacement CTO for wireless products.

We'll have more reporting on the specifics of his departure and what it means for Alcatel-Lucent in the coming days.

— Phil Harvey, Editor-in-Chief, and Ray Le Maistre, International Managing Editor, Light Reading

autoexec.bat 12/5/2012 | 4:43:14 PM
re: Mankiewich Out as AlcaLu Wireless CTO

One by one, as the Lucent Lifers(TM) are jettisoned, you'll find that the company's fortunes will improve.  Things will become as they should have been all along - or at least since December 1, 2006.

Stevery 12/5/2012 | 4:43:11 PM
re: Mankiewich Out as AlcaLu Wireless CTO

The question is whether the replacement is new blood with (gasp) actual experience from the biz side, or some lifer.


The former indicates Ben is genuinely trying for change, the latter is that he is doing the same thing over and over again and telling the board that this time will yield a different outcome.

tguch 12/5/2012 | 4:43:07 PM
re: Mankiewich Out as AlcaLu Wireless CTO

Come on guys, these comments are off the mark. Just because someone has been in the industry for decades does not mean they are slow to change or defending a status quo. Wrong assumption.


On another (related!) note, check out the live Light Reading broadcast "IP Goes Mobile: Redefining LTE Wireless Broadband" from Dec. in which Paul talks frankly with Mike Schabel (also from Alcatel-Lucent) about today's wireless broadband networks and what challenges and opportunities IP and LTE will bring.


This was a breakthrough webinar for our industry--live broadcast with integrated Twitter stream. See press release: http://www.lightreading.com/do...


(Yes, I work at Alcatel-Lucent...)

Stevery 12/5/2012 | 4:43:05 PM
re: Mankiewich Out as AlcaLu Wireless CTO

Come on guys, these comments are off the mark.


That's one possibility.  There is another.


Just because someone has been in the industry for decades does not mean they are slow to change or defending a status quo. Wrong assumption.


The assumption that "lifer" is equivalent to "someone has been in the industry for decades" is a wrong assumption.  Perhaps that is my fault for causing ambiguity by not defining "lifer":  Somebody who has been at the same _company_ for most of their post-graduation life.  Such folks would have a tough time firing 80-90% of a managerial workforce, which could well be required for turnaround cases.



This was a breakthrough webinar


I amend my statement above:  Breakthrough Managerial Synergies Require Shifts In Paradigms Best Delivered By Outside Industrial Experts!


FredStein 12/5/2012 | 4:42:50 PM
re: Mankiewich Out as AlcaLu Wireless CTO

Let's not condemn or praise Paul M. Better to ask, "What does this mean?"


ALU, and similar North American and Northern European TEMs seem to struggling to compete with Huawei. They have to change radically. How do they achieve the dramatic, as in 10x, improvements in throughput per $, per watt, per sq ft of floor space? Do the use partners, outsourcing? Do they re-implement their solutions with new technology?

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