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Investors Stand By Santera

Light Reading
News Analysis
Light Reading
8/20/2001

Santera Systems Inc. today announced that it has closed a third round of debt and equity financing totaling about $110 million (see Santera Scores Huge Round 3).

The size of the round suggests that Santera has managed to convince investors that there’s still plenty of potential in its switch, which aims to do double duty: as the equivalent of a “big hummer” Class 5 telephone exchange in addition to providing all of the paraphernalia necessary to also offer users Internet access out of the same box.

On the face of it, that seems surprising, because “God boxes” like this haven't just lost their appeal -- they've become the butt of jokes around here (see God is Dead).

Santera’s original target market, CLECs (competitive local exchange carriers), has gone sour, with some operators going bust and others having to tighten their belts. And at least one other developer of a similar sort of switch -- Tachion Networks -- has already gone belly up after promising the world and delivering very little.

Santera's success in raising its third round (in spite of having a name that calls to mind the ritual slaughter of chickens) suggests that Tachion’s troubles may have cast a disproportionate shadow over this market, which is potentially very large and in which at least one startup -- Sonus Networks Inc. (Nasdaq: SONS) -- has already prospered. Sonus now counts some large carriers as customers and is a public company worth more than Tellium Inc. (Nasdaq: TELM) and Redback Networks Inc. (Nasdaq: RBAK) combined.

Another startup in this field, Convergent Networks Inc., also appears to be gathering momentum. It’s raised $139.8 million to date and says its gear is installed in 11 working networks.

With its new round of financing, Santera could be heading in the same direction. It’s raised even more money than Convergent -- more than $200 million altogether -- and has already got six customers for its gear. Some major carriers are evaluating Santera’s box, according to CEO David Heard. It’s a fair bet that these include the unidentified “international and domestic service providers” that participated in Santera’s latest round of funding, according to the company’s press release today.



Heard acknowledges that he faces a “huge task” in convincing incumbent operators to buy his gear. "The switching network only changes out every 20 to 25 years," he says. Initially, Santera will aim to win business handling some point solutions, such as Internet and Tandem offload applications, while attempting to replace big, legacy boxes.

On that note, Santera says its box is NEBS (Network Equipment-Building System) certified and is well along in its OSMINE (Operations Systems Modification of Intelligent Network Elements) compliance testing. Both NEBS and OSMINE tests are generally required before an incumbent carrier will let a piece of gear into its central office.

What still isn't clear is the price Santera paid for its most recent funding round. Its managers brush off questions about its valuation, saying such matters aren't important in the private company universe. "We weren't too harmed by the [ownership] dilution factor," says Heard.

Santera was founded by Wu-Fu Chen and San-qi Li and is backed by Austin Ventures, Institutional Venture Partners, Meritech Capital Partners, Redpoint Ventures, Sequoia Capital, and others. - Phil Harvey, Senior Editor, Light Reading
http://www.lightreading.com

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laserman
laserman
12/4/2012 | 7:56:14 PM
re: Investors Stand By Santera
They may get some funding to last for another year. But do these vendors survive?
gardner
gardner
12/4/2012 | 7:56:13 PM
re: Investors Stand By Santera
I went over and looked at their page and poked around a little. In particular I happened onto the following job requirement that they posted: http://santera.kenexa.com/sant...

Check it out. How many folks do you suppose there are that have 20+ years of experience designing service provisioning platforms? Was anyone doing that in 1981--a full year before the divestiture? There wasn't a lot of service to provision in those days and the idea of a software platform for such provisioning came around much later I think.
I can't help but think that if they don't have their stuff together on what they are looking for in an employee there might be other places where they are being unrealistic. I find it hard to imagine that someone who was writing code for AT&T a year before the Bell divestiture would know SNMP, let alone CORBA and JAVA, Just because the job market is tight doesn't mean that you don't make yourself look foolish by making unrealistic demands. And suppose someone came to you with all that on their resume? Would you believe them? If you did who would be the fool? Am I being too harsh? What do others think?
who is john galt?
who is john galt?
12/4/2012 | 7:56:13 PM
re: Investors Stand By Santera
Gardner,

Most systems in the ILECs are 20+ years old. This includes services provisioning (ie; TIRKS, LFACS, etc.). These platforms have been continually upgraded (?) by Telcordia for new interfaces and new applications. Check out the OSMINE process.

If your target customer is an ILEC, it's probably really smart to hire someone with this type of experience.

Interfacing anything to an ILECs OSS is a complicated process. Hiring expertise to help you through it is a smart investment.
uncle_optics@yahoo.com
[email protected]
12/4/2012 | 7:56:10 PM
re: Investors Stand By Santera
Osmine is a huge scam that Telcordia uses to keep the market limited to select few. The RBOC operations people won't talk to you until you get into the process and pay your tab (bribe)

Any metro vendor who is not in the process is DOA. RBOCs require it, contrary to what Luminous et al claim and the IXCs who have to talk to an RBOC network are requiring it too. Sure, there are non-regulated purchases of non-Osmine certified products but the real big $$$$ are going to come from the big boys.

JMHO

Two
Two
12/4/2012 | 7:56:08 PM
re: Investors Stand By Santera
Well, some of us old coots have been working for a while, and we keep up... Do you have any idea how many coders there were at T back then? (in the days when we all worked 9 to 5...but got paid shite too)

The most unrealistic expectation the way I see it is that they want me to move back to Texas (not even for a "Big Texas Challenge" 72 ounce steak in Amarillo) :)

..

-----------------------------------------------

>I went over and looked at their page and poked >around a little. In particular I happened onto >the following job requirement that they posted: >http://santera.kenexa.com/sant...

>Check it out. How many folks do you suppose >there are that have 20+ years of experience >designing service provisioning platforms? Was >anyone doing that in 1981--a full year before >the divestiture? There wasn't a lot of service >to provision in those days and the idea of a >software platform for such provisioning came >around much later I think.
>I can't help but think that if they don't have >their stuff together on what they are looking >for in an employee there might be other places >where they are being unrealistic. I find it hard >to imagine that someone who was writing code for >AT&T a year before the Bell divestiture would >know SNMP, let alone CORBA and JAVA, Just >because the job market is tight doesn't mean >that you don't make yourself look foolish by >making unrealistic demands. And suppose someone >came to you with all that on their resume? Would >you believe them? If you did who would be the >fool? Am I being too harsh? What do others >think?
who is john galt?
who is john galt?
12/4/2012 | 7:56:06 PM
re: Investors Stand By Santera
Uncle Optics,

OSMINE is not necessarily a Telcordia scam. Most carriers (non-RBOC) modify their own systems to implement a new piece of gear. The RBOCs require you to modify their systems (the Telcordia ones) via the OSMINE process to fit your gear.

They do screw all vendors equally, however, because even the established players - Lucent, Nortel, et al. - have to play this game as well.
litehearted
litehearted
12/4/2012 | 7:56:06 PM
re: Investors Stand By Santera
I agree with your comments. I work in the OSS market. Releases of software are released usually in six month cycles. I've yet to hear of an OSMINE certification matching that time frame. Customers want the product to work. If a product does not, it will be punished. If OSS manufacturers were to spend their time on supporting the OSMINE process, what new features would be developed in the software? It would be a continuous OSMINE process, which is very profitable for Telecordia
=================================================
OSMINE costs far too much money and takes far too long. The end result is that the new vendors are limited in bringing new products and solutions to the table. The winning vendors pass the costs back to the SPs they sell to in the end. For a start up company, they have to raise a lot more money to enter the process.

Now, OSS is a messy issue and I do not purport to say that you can bypass what is there. However, I am also not expressing a new thought. LR did a story on this scam last year.

Face it....there is a better way to do the certification process. It's called competition. Let another firm come in and compete for the business which might mean lower prices, faster certification and more choices for product. The current system has no price checking system and limits choice.

If the RBOC operations people whine, then maybe it should tell you something
uncle_optics@yahoo.com
[email protected]
12/4/2012 | 7:56:06 PM
re: Investors Stand By Santera
OSMINE costs far too much money and takes far too long. The end result is that the new vendors are limited in bringing new products and solutions to the table. The winning vendors pass the costs back to the SPs they sell to in the end. For a start up company, they have to raise a lot more money to enter the process.

Now, OSS is a messy issue and I do not purport to say that you can bypass what is there. However, I am also not expressing a new thought. LR did a story on this scam last year.

Face it....there is a better way to do the certification process. It's called competition. Let another firm come in and compete for the business which might mean lower prices, faster certification and more choices for product. The current system has no price checking system and limits choice.

If the RBOC operations people whine, then maybe it should tell you something.
SS7
SS7
12/4/2012 | 7:56:06 PM
re: Investors Stand By Santera
Is there a market for class 4/5 replacement switches? Has the collapse of the CLEC/ISP slammed the door on these vendors or will the ILEC/IXE look to blow up their dependency on their incumbent vendors (LU/NT)?

This distributed softswitch / Media Gateway/ Application Server would seem to benefit incumbents by driving down prices and choosing best of breed but will it happen?
gardner
gardner
12/4/2012 | 7:56:05 PM
re: Investors Stand By Santera
Most systems in the ILECs are 20+ years old. This includes services provisioning (ie; TIRKS, LFACS, etc.). These platforms have been continually upgraded (?) by Telcordia for new interfaces and new applications. Check out the OSMINE process.

Sure, but do these legacy monoliths (TIRKS etc.) constitute a platform? Is it likely that someone steeped in the traditions of OPS/INE and TIRKS would also be familiar with JAVA, CORBA, and modern GUI development, much less a nice layered platform architecture? The fundamental, bottom line question is this: "Does the person described in this posting exist?" I think not and I think further that it is so obvious that it makes the posting look almost silly. I have to wonder if they are really serious about getting someone or if the post exists for some other purpose.


Interfacing anything to an ILECs OSS is a complicated process. Hiring expertise to help you through it is a smart investment.

But is that the job advertised here? One needs to make the distinction between an architect who is expected to bring bold vision and an idea of how the converged network could be and someone to get you through the certification process. The architect would need to consult with the ILEC expert but don't expect both the vision of how things could be and the expertise in how things are now to come from the same person. I think this expectation shows some lack of understanding of how people function and how the human mind works.
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