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Integra5 Wants Deals, Not Lawsuits

The CEO of Integra5 Communications Inc. , Meredith Flynn-Ripley, is making it clear that her company would rather pursue deals than lawsuits after obtaining a key patent that describes how phone calls and call messaging can be managed using the television.

That patent, U.S. No. 7,277,445, describes how a TV can display information about incoming voicemails. The patent also details how a call can be retrieved and rerouted using commands entered via the TV.

Integra5 was officially awarded the patent on Oct. 2. The company now holds 10 patents spread across Australia, Canada, Germany, Israel, and The U.K. (See Integra5 Gets Patent .)



The company says the call control and call screening capabilities covered by the patent cover IPTV as well as cable hybrid/fiber coax (HFC) networks.

Integra5 has disclosed deployments of the TV-based caller ID app with MSOs such as Comporium Communications , Knology Inc. (Nasdaq: KNOL), and WideOpenWest Holdings LLC (WOW) . Overall, the company has 13 deployments and contracts with 16 operators, most of them unannounced, Flynn-Ripley says.

Operator and equipment vendors across the map want to do caller-ID-on-the-TV applications, but many have opted to avoid Integra5's service fees by developing their own versions. So, the big question is whether Integra5 will pursue lawsuits now that it's got a patent.

At this point, the company says no. "We want to be friends [with operators]," Flynn-Ripley says. "We're not looking to create any wars now, and are focused on building the business."

The company is hoping it can score deals with new customers as well as operators that have built their own TV-based caller ID messaging services. Key to that strategy is the fact that Integra5 offers a converged application platform for TVs, mobile phones, and other screens, letting operators avoid the practice of building applications in silos.

Taking that approach with the Integra5 Converged Services Platform (i5 CSP), Flynn-Ripley notes, will let operators run other messaging applications, including video voice mail, news alerts, and even customer care notifications. MSOs could send pop-up windows to promote a change in the programming lineup or a new video-on-demand title, and possibly extend that idea to mobile phones and PCs.

As for the possibility of licensing its patent portfolio to MSOs and other vendors, Integra5 "hasn't made any solid decisions," Flynn-Ripley says.

Currently, the Burlington, Mass.-based company uses a software license business model, with fees determined based on the number of homes connected to the platform and the number of applications that the operator activates.

— Jeff Baumgartner, Site Editor, Cable Digital News

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bollocks187 12/5/2012 | 3:00:54 PM
re: Integra5 Wants Deals, Not Lawsuits We are consumed by patent protection yet the "idea" is not original.

bollocks187 12/5/2012 | 3:00:54 PM
re: Integra5 Wants Deals, Not Lawsuits We are consumed by patent protection yet the "idea" is not original.

spelurker 12/5/2012 | 3:00:52 PM
re: Integra5 Wants Deals, Not Lawsuits > Sorry, but this has been done by a company that I won't disclose the name
> of here. Shows how clueless the US Patent office is!!!

Did they do any work on it prior to Nov 2001 (the date of Integra5's provisional patent application)? My guess is no.

It's easy to sit back 6 years later and say someone else did it, but the "someone else" probably started later and was (unknowingly) in violation.
Jeff Baumgartner 12/5/2012 | 3:00:52 PM
re: Integra5 Wants Deals, Not Lawsuits A few years ago, when the VOD patent battle between Seachange and what was then nCUBE began to heat up, a colleague of mine said patents are good for one thing GÇô suing other people or other companies. Integra5 says it's not their intention to head in that directionGǪand appears to have a decent number of deployments, though it can't disclose most of them yet. But we'll keep our ear to the ground and try to determine where things head from here.
trzwuip 12/5/2012 | 3:00:52 PM
re: Integra5 Wants Deals, Not Lawsuits Sorry, but this has been done by a company that I won't disclose the name of here. Shows how clueless the US Patent office is!!!
paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 3:00:51 PM
re: Integra5 Wants Deals, Not Lawsuits

Issued patents are of a nominal value. Successfully prosecuted issued patents are of a much greater value.

Until these patents have stood up in a claim, they are just a set of claims. The USPTO can not do a 100% investigation of all things at all times, so often issues patents on ideas that are not novel.

seven
Steve0616 12/5/2012 | 3:00:50 PM
re: Integra5 Wants Deals, Not Lawsuits True, but in reality, it costs several millions of dollars to prove a patent is worthy of what the USPTO grants. That comes only when the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirms it.
trzwuip 12/5/2012 | 3:00:50 PM
re: Integra5 Wants Deals, Not Lawsuits Actually first deployments were in 2001. Get bent!
eyalbartfeld 12/5/2012 | 3:00:50 PM
re: Integra5 Wants Deals, Not Lawsuits We should realize that an idea is NOT equivalent to a patent (and vice versa). A patent describes ways of implementing ideas, each implementation may be different. The technology we claim in our patents has been thoroughly examined by the US patent office (and some other patent offices around the world) and found patentable.

Eyal Bartfeld, Integra5
Jeff Baumgartner 12/5/2012 | 3:00:49 PM
re: Integra5 Wants Deals, Not Lawsuits To be fair, Integra5 didn't come out guns blazing to discuss the deals v lawsuits angle. In fact, they might not have discussed that particular topic if I didn't include it in my line of questioning. But, at the same time, it seemed to me to be a fair question to ask because of the great number of patent-related lawsuits buzzing around these days and the fact that some ops have built apps such as these in-house. Based on what I heard back, that's the angle I decided to lead the story with.

Jeff

Get on with it and make a business and stop publizing that you want deals not lawsuits - how low is that.....

Also if there are cases that people have implemented (an not patented) in the public domain ahead of you then you have NO chance defending the Patent. A good case is the CISCO IP Triple patent another lame one.
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