x

G'Day. Not

8:00 AM -- Red Panda received the following sales missive from his local vintner this week. Bluntly, he refuses to believe that anything that comes out of Australia is worth 325 bones... let alone a bottle of wine.

    AUSTRALIAN WINE SALE

    5 btls Amon Ra Shiraz 2004 @ $79.99 btl.
    This dense ruby purple colored wine exhibits a sweet nose of vanilla , graphite, and blackberry. It is full bodied and pure with a silky finish. It is drinking beautifully now and will last another 12 years. RP93/p> 4 btls Glaymond Distinction Shiraz 2002 @ $84.99 btl.
    Reminiscent of a northern Rhone, the 2002 Glaymond has great delineation and freshness. Concentrated, dense, and full bodied with a huge, unctuous texture. This is the perfect wine with cheese at the end of a meal. RP95/p> 3 btls Kaesler Old Bastard Shiraz 2003 @ $125 btl
    The 2003 Old Bastard Shiraz is a candidate for Shiraz of the vintage from South Australia. Inky purple color along with serious velocity and intensity. It is a superb expression of Barossa Valley Shiraz. A glorious perfume of charcoal, blackberry liqueur, smoke, and vanilla. This big and pure Shiraz can be drunk now or cellared for the next decade. RP96/p> 12 btls Kilikanoon Shiraz Reserve Greens 2003 @ $69.99
    This is one of the most brilliantly run wineries in Australia. Great gobs of blackberry liqueur and glycerin. Impressive texture and delineation.RP95-97/p> 12 btls Kilikanoon Shiraz Reserve 2003 @ $115 btl.
    A new wine from a single vineyard in the Mclaren Vale. Aged 24 months in French Oak. This unfiltered blockbuster possesses sweet cassis and blackberry fruit, truffle, camphor, and flower. Enormous flavor dimensions. Awesome. RP96-98/p> 2 btl. Penfolds Grange 1998 @ $ 325 btl.
    The 1998 Grange will be legendary. A blend of 97% shiraz and 3% Cabernet Sauvignon. Inky purple color is followed by an intense nose of crème des cassis intermixed with floral notes. As it sits in the glass, aromas of meat and plum emerge. It is a seamless effort with sweet tannin, well integrated acidity, and layer upon layer of blackberry and cassis-like fruit. It has harmony, freshness and a remarkable finish. A legend. RP99


Is it just Panda or are these prices absssssssuuuuurrrdddddddd?

— Red Panda, Sommelier, Light Reading

CoolLightGeek 12/5/2012 | 3:45:58 AM
re: G'Day. Not Spouting liberal crap one week, then bragging about your expensive luxuries the next, while simultaneously taking a swipe at Australians being unworthy in the process.

Are you aspiring to be the next Theresa Heinz Kerry ?

To atone, you should probably be put on an exclusive diet of Welch's and forced to watch "Skippy, the bush kangaroo" for at least 6 months.
sfwriter 12/5/2012 | 3:45:54 AM
re: G'Day. Not Grape juice, a staple for American children raised in the 50s, 60s and 70s. Way back before the days of hybrid Apple/Cran/Grape drinks.
sfwriter 12/5/2012 | 3:45:52 AM
re: G'Day. Not Not sure. My mother's instructions were usually limited to warning me not spill it on my clothes because grape juice stains. When she grew tired of the purple splotches, we switched to apple juice.
opticalwatcher 12/5/2012 | 3:45:48 AM
re: G'Day. Not "can [Welch's grape juice] be distilled into a stronger beverage by adding sugar and leaving it in a cupboard for 6 months? if so, it sounds yummy."

Yes, I've done it (in college). Say what you want about Australian wines, but they definitely taste a lot better than my homemade blue colored concoction.
DZED 12/5/2012 | 3:45:44 AM
re: G'Day. Not Australian wines are indeed great!

And Australia is suffering a diabolical wine glut at present so please do your best for your comrades in arms.
CoolLightGeek 12/5/2012 | 3:45:40 AM
re: G'Day. Not Distilling Welch's would void Panda's restitution....

The Dew of the Morning rests upon my Leaves and Clusters.

The Heat of Noon distills for me the Juice that all Men love.

My clusters wax fat; they catch the Purple of the Autumn Sunset.

I become a Mystery and a Marvel, for no Man may Imitate me.

There is no Depth of Wisdom nor Height of Inspiration, nor is there any Avenue of Science which can achieve what Nature Achieves in Me.

I am the Concord Grape.

--Wilbur D. Nesbit.

(OK, I'll grant you that maybe Wilbur was a bit fermented when he wrote it).
mr zippy 12/5/2012 | 3:45:40 AM
re: G'Day. Not It would the Vinter knows better than both Red Panda and I. According to Wikipedia, the 1998 vintage was rated 99/100 by Wine Speculator magazine.

The '98 might be a bargain if it is anything like the first, 1951 vintage, which a bottle sold for AU$50 000 in 2004.

(I shouldn't have to refer to Wikipedia, coming from the home city of Grange and other well known AU wines, however we mostly just drink the stuff, usually after a few beers, so the label has become a bit blurry by then.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P...

And the beer we usually drink ? Coopers of course.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C...

alchemy 12/5/2012 | 3:45:39 AM
re: G'Day. Not Australian wines have come a long way from the early 70's. I have fond memories of this old Monty Python skit:


WINE EXPERT (Eric Idle with an Australian accent): A lot of people in this country pooh-pooh Australian table wines. This is a pity as many fine Australian wines appeal not only to the Australian palate but also to the cognoscenti of Great Britain.
Black Stump Bordeaux is rightly praised as a peppermint flavoured Burgundy, whilst a good Sydney Syrup can rank with any of the world's best sugary wines.

Ch+óteau Blue, too, has won many prizes; not least for its taste, and its lingering afterburn.

Old Smokey 1968 has been compared favourably to a Welsh claret, whilst the Australian Wino Society thoroughly recommends a 1970 Coq du Rod Laver, which, believe me, has a kick on it like a mule: 8 bottles of this and you're really finished. At the opening of the Sydney Bridge Club, they were fishing them out of the main sewers every half an hour.

Of the sparkling wines, the most famous is Perth Pink. This is a bottle with a message in, and the message is 'beware'. This is not a wine for drinking, this is a wine for laying down and avoiding.

Another good fighting wine is Melbourne Old-and-Yellow, which is particularly heavy and should be used only for hand-to-hand combat.

Quite the reverse is true of Ch+óteau Chunder, which is an appellation contr+¦l+¬e, specially grown for those keen on regurgitation; a fine wine which really opens up the sluices at both ends.

Real emetic fans will also go for a Hobart Muddy, and a prize winning Cuivre Reserve Ch+óteau Bottled Nuit San Wogga Wogga, which has a bouquet like an aborigine's armpit.

PO 12/5/2012 | 3:45:38 AM
re: G'Day. Not BusinessWeek recently invited wine expert Robert Parker to contribute a weekly column. In the June 23 issue, he reviewed several moderate Australian wines. (Prices quoted are USD)

http://www.businessweek.com/ma...
HOME
Sign In
SEARCH
CLOSE
MORE
CLOSE