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Optical/IP

Webinar Panelists Ponder PON Growth

Passive Optical Networks (PONs) are seeing solid deployment in the Asia/Pacific and Japan, but U.S. carriers have been slower to commit, opting instead for a hybrid copper-fiber approach, participants in a Light Reading Webinar said Monday.

Verizon Communications announced they will ‘pass’ 3 million homes with PON, meaning they will bring fiber to the node, but will only drop off the main fiber [to the home] after the subscribers subscribe,” Webinar moderator Michael Howard, principal of Infonetics Research Inc., explains.

SBC Communications Inc. (NYSE: SBC) and BellSouth Corp. (NYSE: BLS), on the other hand, will provide PON to the household only in new, “greenfield” housing developments, Howard says.

The Webinar, titled “PON and FTTX Update,” provided a status report on the development of different variants of passive optical networks (APON, BPON, EPON, GPON) around the world. Panelists agreed that PONs can reach a return on investment within one year and provide better scaleability and performance for carriers.

Japan’s NTT recently announced that it will invest $48 million to connect 30 million subscribers to PON by 2010. Governments in some countries in the region are sponsoring programs to promote deployment of PONs.

Infonetics, which tracks worldwide PON growth quarterly, said the technology has grown 500 percent cumulatively since 2003 and is expected to continue at that pace through 2007. Howard points to IP video as the key driver of PON’s growth.

Howard said PON solutions typically provide 100 Mbit/s of bandwidth per subscriber, and will compete directly with DSL service.

PON is growing rapidly in Asia, especially Japan, where tens of thousands of subscribers are using BPON and EPON, Infonetics says. And a new round of less expensive products expected in 2005 and 2006 should continue to fuel the growth.

During the Webinar, representatives from optical equipment providers UTStarcom Inc. (Nasdaq: UTSI), Alcatel Optronics (Nasdaq: ALAO; Paris: CGO.PA) and Acterna Corp. discussed the relative virtues of PON’s various flavors and took audience questions.

Howard says APON/BPON makes up 77 percent of all North American metro PON optical line terminal (OLT) revenue today, while EPON makes up 72 percent of all Asia/Pacific PON OLT revenue (see Infonetics Reports on PON Market).

GPON (BPON's successor) is a flexible option for providers because it's designed for Ethernet, IP, and ATM, and can stream video over both IP and cable. EPON, however, offers roughly twice the capacity of GPON, but all traffic, including video, must ride on a single wavelength, Howard says.

The Webinar will be archived here this week for future viewing.

— Mark Sullivan, Reporter, Light Reading

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jayja 12/5/2012 | 3:30:22 AM
re: Webinar Panelists Ponder PON Growth The 1490 nm downstream baseband channel was set by FSAN (Full Service Access Network) consortium of phone companies and submitted to the ITU for approval as Recommendation G.983.3. The original PON standard G.983.1 used 1550 nm for this channel, but the phone companies wanted to clear 1550 nm for analog video in G.983 and later PON standards.

They may have made a mistake by not including vendors in this design as interference between the 1490 and 1550 nm channels is a limitation. This channel should likely have been placed at 1400 nm or so. Technology to do so was available at the time, but FSAN was not aware.
optical_optimist 12/5/2012 | 3:30:20 AM
re: Webinar Panelists Ponder PON Growth Dear Light Reading, You have an error in the 5th paragraph. NTT plans to invest $48 billion, not $48 million.
redface 12/5/2012 | 3:30:19 AM
re: Webinar Panelists Ponder PON Growth The link is

http://www.kapid.org/eng/board...

The extra "period" screwed up the link.
redface 12/5/2012 | 3:30:19 AM
re: Webinar Panelists Ponder PON Growth dwdm2 asked: "Considering the complexity, wouldn't it be simpler to put in a wdm system (if the cost was comparable)? Any thoughts?"

Yes, people have been working on WDM-PON and it is a contendor in PON war (although very few people know about it). See
http://www.kapid.org/eng/board....

Normally WDM systems cost a lot higher than simple PON. But a cheap and effective WDM-PON approach was found and as a result WDM-PON is less than a factor of two the cost of normal PON. Some people are hoping that it will displace all other flavors of PON because it offers a lot more benefits, according to the above web link.
MrLight 12/5/2012 | 3:26:07 AM
re: Webinar Panelists Ponder PON Growth Two comments on Post 9 from jayja:

1)"They may have made a mistake by not including vendors in this design as interference between the 1490 and 1550 nm channels is a limitation. This channel should likely have been placed at 1400 nm or so."

RESPONSE: No, it was not a mistake. For SMF-28 fiber CWDM grids 6,7,8,9,10 (1370nm, 1390nm, 1410nm,1430nm,1450nm)are unusable. You need to have low water peak fiber like SMF-28e or AllWave.

2)"They may have made a mistake by not including vendors in this design as interference between the 1490 and 1550 nm channels is a limitation."

RESPONSE: This is not the true limitation. The true limitation is due to the high optical power used for the AMVSB at 1550nm with resulting Raman/Brioullian effects.


MrLight..Been PONing on and off since 1994 waiting for the intersection of the market with the technology, which looks like 2006.

P.S.1490nm is on the 12th CWDM grid per CWDM channels per G.694.2 June.2002.
dwdm2 12/5/2012 | 12:58:52 AM
re: Webinar Panelists Ponder PON Growth I am not an expert on PON, but its seems to me just using a splitter to distribute information a rather simpler solution. I'd have assumed that a more intelligent system such as WDM be more appropriate from the curb to premises distribution. Can someone shed some light on the technology? Thanks
optical Mike 12/5/2012 | 12:58:47 AM
re: Webinar Panelists Ponder PON Growth You could check out
http://www.ponforum.org/techno...
or
http://www.iec.org/online/tuto...
has some useful tutorials in differnt technology
dwdm2 12/5/2012 | 12:58:41 AM
re: Webinar Panelists Ponder PON Growth Mike, thanks for the links. I found many more links by googling as well. One thing I couldn't figure out is this: The cable cos use filters to discriminate between their service packages; e.g., I don't subscribe to the standard package, I get only the basic package, that has channels in the low numbers and high numbers. While the signal that comes to the curb has all channels, they stop the mid band from coming to my home by adding a filter in our curb side pedestal. If the PON is using only a splitter like mechanism to distribute signal from the curb to the houses, how'll one implement a scheme like the above? In principle one could probably splice an optical filter just like the electronic filter of the above example, but optical filters are not the same as the electronic ones. Considering the complexity, wouldn't it be simpler to put in a wdm system (if the cost was comparable)? Any thoughts? Thanks
optical Mike 12/5/2012 | 12:58:37 AM
re: Webinar Panelists Ponder PON Growth There are a couple ways to accomplish what your asking,
At the customer premise the ONT does the optical to electrical conversion the RF video overlay is at 1550 nm while the PON transport is at 1490 nm. After conversion back to RF it goes to your coax connector on the unit, a filter can be inserted in-line prior to the customers in house wiring. Alternately if your using a GPON system then SDV (Switched Digital Video) or IPTV with IP set top boxes would be the way to go. Customers can purchase whatever channel package they wish and their STB will be provisioned to access the video streams or channels they have requested or watch any pay-per-view events or movies they request
rjmcmahon 12/5/2012 | 12:58:35 AM
re: Webinar Panelists Ponder PON Growth Alternately if your using a GPON system then SDV (Switched Digital Video) or IPTV with IP set top boxes would be the way to go. Customers can purchase whatever channel package they wish and their STB will be provisioned to access the video streams or channels they have requested or watch any pay-per-view events or movies they request

Two questions:

1) Has anybody (or who has plans) to use IP multicast to distribute a channel or channel package?

2) Can a customer select realtime (via the TV remote) to subscribe to a channel or channel package and receive them instantaneously? Or vice versa, can a customer cancel a channel/channel package just as easily?

Thanks in advance for any comments or pointers.
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