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Optical/IP

Trying to Do the DO

Airvana Inc. has been running a CDMA2000 1x EV-DO network at its Chelmsford, Mass., offices for a while now.

So when Unstrung got on the phone with Paul Sergeant, VP of product marketing at the networking infrastructure equipment startup, we wanted numbers -- data rate transfer numbers to be precise.

From the carrier trials Airvana is doing with the likes of Verizon Wireless, as well as the experience of running its own network, Sergeant reckons a fully loaded EV-DO (that's "data only") will deliver data transfer rates of between 300 kbit/s and 500 kbit/s.

Which isn't too shabby at all. The newest networks online in the U.S. -- GPRS and CDMA 1xRTT -- can download applications at speeds of 20 kbit/s to 70 kbit/s for 1x [ed note: Yeah, we know they say 144 kbit/s tops, but we're talking real world here].

Airvana is building all-IP radio access networks and claims that taking an all-IP approach has two major benefits. With a pure IP backhaul network, a customer can take advantage of a traditional ATM setup, reducing the cost of implementing the network. Also, because Airvana's technology does not touch the voice network, the company envisages its use in conjunction with an existing network, even one with a different air interface.

So the signs look alright for Airvana -- big trials, a partnership with Nortel Networks Corp. (NYSE/Toronto: NT), and a stoopid name. But we're still wondering when its equipment will be used in anger.

"Right now, nobody is using our system," Sergeant concedes.

We asked Verizon how far along it is with the EV-DO trials, but it's not revealing anything. "Nothing is imminent," says a company spokesperson helpfully.

— Dan Jones, Senior Editor, Unstrung www.unstrung.com
wonderfull 12/4/2012 | 9:25:43 PM
re: Trying to Do the DO Isn't EVDO supposed to provide 2.4Mbps peak?
Why is Airvana quoting 300-500 Kbps only? Seems
like HDR is falling short....

spassmeister 12/4/2012 | 9:25:36 PM
re: Trying to Do the DO EVDO sets the rate based on the quality of the link. Users nearer to the cell site can get up to 2.4 mpbs. Users at the edge of cell coverage get (I think) 38kbps.

radio engineering 101...higher S/N ratios permit higher order modulation and therefore faster data rates.
wonderfull 12/4/2012 | 9:25:30 PM
re: Trying to Do the DO Korean carriers routinely mention rates of 200-400 Kbps. They back away from even mentioning rates higher than 1.2 Mbps, irrespective of the lcoation.

>Users nearer to the cell site can get up to 2.4 mpbs.

At best 1 user close to the antenna in a cell(or sector) may get up to 2.4 mpbs. It is SHARED theoretical throughput max of 2.4 Mbps. Qualcomm has noted that only 5-6% of the coverage area may experience 2.4 Mbps!

>Users at the edge of cell coverage get (I think) 38kbps.

Hmm. 1xRTT rates.

>radio engineering 101...higher S/N ratios permit higher order modulation and therefore faster data rates.

Link adaptation at work is pretty common in all wireless systems today.

joset01 12/4/2012 | 9:25:02 PM
re: Trying to Do the DO I asked Airvana to try and give "real world" rates, i.e, to the best of their knowledge what are the actual rates likely to be on a network with lots of users on it... this is what they said. I try and get this info out of everyone I speak to about data rates, it isn't always easy to get a straight answer

DJ
christer44 12/4/2012 | 9:25:01 PM
re: Trying to Do the DO This is why good antennae solutions are so crucial!

Increase the link marging => increase the bandwidth achievable at the edge of the cell (or reduce noise so as to increase number of calls in cell).

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