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Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks

Light Reading
Interview
Light Reading
4/26/2004
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Pradeep Sindhu, the founder, vice chairman, and CTO of Juniper Networks Inc. (Nasdaq: JNPR), has come a long way from his days at the Computer Science Lab at Xerox PARC, the birthplace of many a networking technology, including Ethernet and the first optical-cable-based LAN.

In 1996, Sindhu left Xerox after he cooked up the idea for a high-end router company. Sindhu was joined by Scott Kriens, who became Juniper's CEO, and the rest is history. Juniper was up and running in a couple of years and staged one of the most successful technology IPOs in history in 1999.

We met with Sindhu at Juniper's headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif., in early April. A couple of weeks later we enjoyed hearing Sindhu speak at the Light Reading Live investment conference in New York, "The Telecom Recovery: Opportunities Amid the Chaos."

We've combined and edited the contents of these separate discussions and presented them here in this Q&A.

Sindhu's main role right now appears to be crusading for Juniper's "Infranet" initiative. Yes, the name sounds like something from the Jetsons. Some have even called it a "marketecture." But Juniper's dead serious about this Infranet thing, so we thought it was important to find out what it's all about.

The idea is to get any device to connect to any other with the appropriate speed, QOS, and security. The necessary tradeoffs among four dimensions – security, speed, reliability, quality of service – need to be handled according to the needs of each particular application. (Connectivity is a fifth dimension but isn't as problematic as the other four.) The challenge is to build a network that can simultaneously weigh all those factors and build connections for applications that suit the range of needs across this four-dimensional spectrum.

So, what Juniper says the telecom industry now needs is a bulletproof packet network that can be adjusted to applications on the fly, depending on where they fit in the four dimensions.

It's a tall order. The stuff we have today won't cut it – as Sindhu freely admits. Sindhu and Juniper are suggesting the industry should put some serious planning into this, with a focus on some new standards (see Juniper Does Vision Thing).

Will it work? Who knows. In order to make it work, Juniper needs to move many of the largest service proviers in the world to support its efforts. Find out more about what this is all about in the following pages:

— R. Scott Raynovich, US Editor, and Craig Matsumoto, Senior Editor, Light Reading

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dljvjbsl
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dljvjbsl,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:55:42 AM
re: Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks

Engineers on the other hand, are techno-fanatics. For them, the bellhead/nethead debate will never be over...


This analysis is surprising given what is going on this board. The engineers seem to have put the cocie/data controversy behind them. It is the adminstrators who contribute who call people propeller-heads etc who cannot seem to accept the new reality.
light_biz
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light_biz,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:55:42 AM
re: Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks
"Upper management (VP and above) at service providers and equipment vendors are technologically agnostic. They just want to make money - circuits, packets, whatever."

Well said! And They are the only one who WILL make
money. United They Stand.
jim_smith
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jim_smith,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:55:42 AM
re: Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks
Upper management (VP and above) at service providers and equipment vendors are technologically agnostic. They just want to make money - circuits, packets, whatever.

So I'm not surprised by PS's answer to that question.

Engineers on the other hand, are techno-fanatics. For them, the bellhead/nethead debate will never be over...
sevenbrooks
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sevenbrooks,
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12/5/2012 | 1:55:41 AM
re: Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks

Wow, an IP router guy declares the war is over and packet has won.

However, there will be many applications for what used to be called the "network 500" (those companies whose business is their network - Airlines, Banks, Financial Services, Insurance) that will never likely move to a packet infrastructure at a network level. If not never, how about maybe not this century. Wow, you say? How about say...Wells Fargo Bank's line to the Federal Reserve Bank. Think that is moving anytime soon? Nope.

So, here is the thing. Many applications will move to packet based public networking. This has, in fact, already occurred (see Frame Relay). People view this as some major revelation, but its not. Can it be run on an infrastucture shared with parts of the public internet? Well, lets hope so otherwise we end up with multiple networks in the packet level. Its going to be a long time till leased lines are going to go away, so lets hope we can get packet network consolidation. Then things will be at least as good as they are today.

seven
technoboy
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technoboy,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:55:40 AM
re: Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks
Re post 04

Sevenbrooks you do realize that it is 2004 not 1999 right. Just as the previous post may have been a generalization your post is off the chart. Not in this century!!!

These are the types of posts that are great in their sensationalism but offer little in the way of facts.
whyiswhy
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whyiswhy,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:55:39 AM
re: Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks
Reality check:

Some branches of the USG are still using IBM punch cards...still. It's cheap and simple and nearly vendor agnostic. Florida and chads was just the tip of it.

I would guess seven is speaking of 100% change to public networking. I agree with him. The DOD hauls a shix pot full of data. The DOD net will never be public. Wrap it all you want, it won't happen. I mean that's what GIGBE is all about. And GIGBE will be very antiquated before it gets replaced. Just like the network it is very slowly replacing.

-Why
technonerd
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technonerd,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 1:55:38 AM
re: Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks
Can it be run on an infrastucture shared with parts of the public internet?
Physically speaking, there is no such thing as "the public internet." It is a virtual network that always has communicated over the very same backbone used by the PSTN.
technoboy
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technoboy,
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12/5/2012 | 1:55:35 AM
re: Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks
Re post 6

Why
Check sevens post. He stated they would not be moving to a packet network not public network. This is not a small distinction. Just as there are many elements of the government still on legacy technology there are many that are on more leading edge technology. I find it a little silly to comment about what the future public internet will look like in even 20 years let alone this century.
technonerd
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technonerd,
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12/5/2012 | 1:55:34 AM
re: Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks
What does this have to do with the price of tea in China??
Propellerheads have a way of referring to the Internet as if it is a thing apart from the rest of the telecom infrastructure, which couldn't be further from the truth.
sevenbrooks
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sevenbrooks,
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12/5/2012 | 1:55:34 AM
re: Pradeep Sindhu, Juniper Networks

I do realize its 2004.

Sorry, TDM leased lines are not going away. Do you have any idea of the cost of losing a connection to the FRB (as measured in Millions of dollars per second?). Do you think it matters what it costs for this line and its multiple backups?

Technoboy. You simply have never been associated with these type of businesses. Thats why things move very slowly. Because of the quality issues associated with moving these critcal circuits. From an enterprise network, whats been moved are no where near as mission critical as the circuits I described with an example.

Thats the point multiple level of networks (Layer 1, Layer 2 and Layer 3) will continue to exist for the foreseeable future if not forever. To say they are converging and that somebody has "won" is basically "stupid". Some applications (perhaps covering most of the network) will move. Perhaps most of the new applications will move. But the wonderful pictures of all things moving are bogus. Thus, we will end up with the horrible (multiple, overlay, legacy - pick your favorite word) networks forever.

So, people need to rethink their whole arguments around Opex savings associated with yet another new overlay network.

seven
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