x
Optical/IP

Nokia's Fast Mover

Don't stop us if you've already heard this one.

Light Reading's sister site Unstrung discovered, while out clubbing [ed. note: seals?], that Finnish behemoth Nokia Corp. (NYSE: NOK) has a record-holder in its midst.

At a party organized for the launch of Nokia's new gaming device, they were told that Anssi Vanjoki, executive vice president, Nokia Mobile Phones, holds the Finnish record for the highest-ever fine for speeding. He smashed the speed limit on his Harley Davidson in October 2001, doing 75 km per hour (47 miles per hour) in a 50 km/h (31 mph) area.

They heard the fine was quite impressive, so when the man himself loomed into view, they cornered him and asked for the details. "I was fined €116,000," he admitted. (That's $125,000 at today's exchange rate.) Oh, how they laughed. And laughed. And laughed.

That, they figured, must be a record. "Yes it is, but not one I am proud of," he added, before tiring of such triviality and speeding off (though not on his throbbing engine).

It seems that in Finland, speeding fines are a proportion of your income: Vanjoki was forced to pay 14 days' worth of earnings. The fine was based on 1999 income, apparently, which means Vanjoki must have netted a cool €3 million that year.

So he could afford it, then.

Evel
Flying Finish
Evel
Flying Finnish
— Ray Le Maistre, European Editor, Unstrung
52543 12/5/2012 | 12:42:02 AM
re: Nokia's Fast Mover Did LR find out what the fine was for the hapless Nortel PR caught in the bus lane with Greg Mumford?

Can we have a section in Ligthreding dedicated to traffic crimes and misdemenaours?
cyber_techy 12/5/2012 | 12:41:54 AM
re: Nokia's Fast Mover This is a very old news. It definitely didn't arrive at Lightreading at the speed of light (Does LR use a Cisco powered network?)

I raced with a guy in a mercedes and topped off at 125mph (200 kph). I should have been fined $3000 (2 weeks pay) but I didn't get caught.
metroshark 12/5/2012 | 12:41:48 AM
re: Nokia's Fast Mover Yeah, it is an old story. Actually, initially, they wanted to fine him a lot more than $125K since he had exercised and sold a whole pile of options that year. Eventually, he was able to convince the Finnish court that his fine should be based on his salary and cash bonus only.
HOME
Sign In
SEARCH
CLOSE
MORE
CLOSE