x
Optical/IP

Looking for Light at NFOEC

DALLAS -- NFOEC -- Attendees at NFOEC look forward to the telecom sector's recovery, but exhibitors and job seekers alike aren't sure how to act in the meantime. While capital spending remains in the doldrums, jobs are scarce and corporate layoffs continue.

How bad has it gotten? Ask Greg Carfine of the American Institute of Physics (AIP), who is helping coordinate a job fair here. After visiting the booths of several large companies to ask if they'd like to post any openings, many companies told him they would, instead, provide resumés of folks they can't employ.

"They sent us folks from other companies who are looking -- or will be looking -- for jobs," says Bonnie Feldman, Carfine's colleague at the AIP.

A few miles away, in Plano, Alcatel Optronics (Nasdaq: ALAO; Paris: CGO.PA) announced it will go from 1,550 workers to fewer than 500 by the end of 2003. The company will sell or close its Plano production plant, this after already having cut its Dallas-based workforce in half during the past 18 months.

Job seekers ambling around NFOEC say they're finding a pleasant reception among the vendors and exhibitors -- just no job opportunities.

At lunchtime on Monday, Dustin and Bryan Eshelbrenner compare notes to see which exhibitors appear most promising. The brothers Eshelbrenner were cut by Sycamore Networks Inc. (Nasdaq: SCMR) in July, and Dustin offers that he thinks Xtera Communications Inc., a long-haul equipment vendor, is hiring.

"Which telecom technology areas haven't been hit?" he asks.

Interestingly, Xtera, based in Allen, Texas, anticipated some job seeker traffic, and its head of human resources was present all day Monday to field questions and receive resumés.

Back at the job fair, only three companies -- Luvantix Co. Ltd., General Dynamics, and Spectra-Physics Inc. (Nasdaq: SPLI) -- are interviewing candidates to fill some 15 jobs. By early Tuesday afternoon, about 250 job seekers had stopped by in person to deliver a resumé and ask for an interview. Carfine expects that AIP will collect about 375 resumés on behalf of the job posters by the time the exhibit hall closes on Wednesday.

Despite the lack of hard leads and tangible results, job seekers here don't feel as though they're wasting time. "It's productive in that you can stay networked," says Marc Norman, former VP of sales for Trellis Photonics. "But I'm not seeing the kind of executive attendance you'd normally expect."

Large exhibiting vendors are seeing similar trends in attendee traffic, save the meetings they arrange before the show. "If we weren't here, we would be conspicuous by our absence," says Ed Kennedy, senior VP of the metro networking group at Tellabs Inc. (Nasdaq: TLAB; Frankfurt: BTLA).

For smaller vendors and job seekers, saving money by skipping NFOEC might also mean a missed visit by a potential customer or a missed opportunity to charm a prospective employer. "For the smaller vendors, it's out of sight, out of mind," says Kennedy.

With jobs and capital spending in short supply, no one wants to be out of mind.

— Phil Harvey, Senior Editor, Light Reading
www.lightreading.com
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
Snape 12/4/2012 | 9:44:59 PM
re: Looking for Light at NFOEC Too many vendors checkin each other out, grabbing each others goodies.

Only one with T-shirts appeared to be light reading.

At our booth, I talked to more vendors and job seekers rather than random customers.
BobbyMax 12/4/2012 | 9:44:57 PM
re: Looking for Light at NFOEC The job situation has become very cyclical and every five years or so a group of people in certain industry are laid off. Very many of our young people cannot lead a normal life. It brings a lot of frustration to the younger generation.

In certain areas of the country the job difficulties have been caused by aarge presence of Imported workers from India and some other countries. We are getting about 150,000 temporary workers every year. Alot of them manage to stay in the US one way or the other.

Our graduates from MIT, Harvard, Princeton, Columbia and Stanford cannot find employment, but HIB visa workers from India and to a lesser extent from other countries, etc. has a job. The US Government has flooded the work force from temporary workers from abroad.

We are permiting our native workforce to d4evelop. There are no policies and prpcedures to bring this to the attention to the attention of State or Federal governments.
AAL5 12/4/2012 | 9:44:56 PM
re: Looking for Light at NFOEC Bobby,

You have some nerve to accuse others of hate campaigns with this typical example of your verbal diarrhea. You say 150,000 temporary workers every year, is this cumulative, or are you basing this on the H1B quotas, please state where you got this figure from.

Regarding imported workers from India you say GǣAlot of them manage to stay in the US one way or the otherGǥ, yes itGs called a green card, perfectly legal, go check it out.

HereGs a question for you Bobby, why do you think there are so many Indians in this country?

a)They are cheap labor
b)Their friends get them into the country and into a job
c)They are well educated, highly motivated and hard working

From my experience (and by the way I am not Indian) those in full time positions are paid the same as Americans, many are very well educated, and many I have met are extremely hard working. I have no experience regarding b), although there are examples of nepotism in many companies regardless of race, color or creed.

Do you think that our companies should have access to the most qualified talent regardless of birth place or would you rather some of these bright people stay at home and compete with the US from their home countries.

AAL5
optical_maverick 12/4/2012 | 9:44:56 PM
re: Looking for Light at NFOEC you are partially right. yes there is a lot of foreign workers here on H1b's and yes there is a lot of educated youth unemployed and frustrated. Here is a point that has not been mentioned. Typically H1b's are hired to fill a short term technical need on a contract basis. Usually it is a technical skillset that requires the candidate to hit the ground running like Oracle Development, QA Testing, GUI Testing,ect. Unfortunetly, organizations will only train somebody from scratch or bring on a new grad as a last resort. So when people complain about the abundance of H1b workers it is equally the fault of the organization who choose to utilize this resource model. Of course every organization is not like this but a good percentage of companies follow this practice.

Mavi.
wayland_smithy 12/4/2012 | 9:44:55 PM
re: Looking for Light at NFOEC Booby,

You seem to have a racist streak in you against Indians (and no, i'm not Indian) - the article below, as well as the ridiculous conspiracy theory against the Cyras/Ciena acquistion - and I quote :
"They knew very well the art of deception practiced by a group of Indian enterpreauners. Many EDA companies, telecom companies, semiconductor companies, networking companies, and various other companies were cheated by this group people. Even large companies such as Lucent, Nortel, Nokia were victimized by these people. The list is almost endless to describe here"

I would suggest that the correct place for you to be debating this nonsense is the psychiatrist's couch rather than LR - clearly you had a traumatic incident in your childhood, probably as a result of an over-spicy curry in an Indian restaurant.
One other theory - if the likes of "Our graduates from MIT, Harvard, Princeton, Columbia and Stanford" practise English (or lack of it) in the same way as yourself, then it's no surprise they're turning to foreign parts for talent.

With your talent for the English language, I wouldrecommend that you should apply for a job in Huawei/Futurewei's marketing department - they also have a talent for such messaging.


----------------------------------------------



In certain areas of the country the job difficulties have been caused by aarge presence of Imported workers from India and some other countries. We are getting about 150,000 temporary workers every year. Alot of them manage to stay in the US one way or the other.
Our graduates from MIT, Harvard, Princeton, Columbia and Stanford cannot find employment, but HIB visa workers from India and to a lesser extent from other countries, etc. has a job.
mbledug 12/4/2012 | 9:44:54 PM
re: Looking for Light at NFOEC
>>It's called GLOBALIZATION.

>I forgot....it's also called.....FREEMARKET

Sorry, I mean CAPITALISM in its purest sense.
mbledug 12/4/2012 | 9:44:54 PM
re: Looking for Light at NFOEC
> It's called GLOBALIZATION.

I forgot....it's also called.....FREEMARKET.

Mbledug
mbledug 12/4/2012 | 9:44:54 PM
re: Looking for Light at NFOEC
Bobby,

It's called GLOBALIZATION.

If you could not face it, then you'd better join
the Anti-Globalization first and help those poor
countries before complaining (By the way, those
poor countries are flooded with US goods, and now
the educated people of those countries start
flooding the US and later on their products too).

Got it?

Mbledug (I'am not an Indian and I don't live and
work in the US).
Phonon-Ex 12/4/2012 | 9:44:48 PM
re: Looking for Light at NFOEC AAL5

While I agree with many of the points you made, I also agree with BobbyM. The fact is - YES, they are cheaper, relative to US nationals. I know this to be true from talking to friends at work and comparing compensation packages. They got fewer shares and more than 5% less than their US counterparts. Moreover, they are held hostage by the sponsoring company, which is at liberty to abuse the H1B in any way they can, until they get their green card. The H1Bs know they can't complain while their green cards are getting processed, or can they?

Cheerio
PEX
Super Genius 12/4/2012 | 9:44:47 PM
re: Looking for Light at NFOEC Call me old fashioned, but what has happened to writing skills? I am constantly dismayed at the lack of proper grammar and spelling on these pages. Come on guys and gals, this does not leave a good impression of engineers/business types. Try using the correct verb tense. Check a dictionary once in a while. Review your message before hitting the enter key. Lets look professional.

To those who may want to respond with the old tired arguments about communication being much more important than grammar, don't bother. I've heard them all before and don't buy them.

S.G.
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
HOME
Sign In
SEARCH
CLOSE
MORE
CLOSE