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Optical/IP

Long-Haul WDM: RFI Exercise

When vendors bid for a big contract to build a long-haul network, their proposals can provide useful insights into the current state of development of transmission and switching technologies.

Usually, of course, only the carrier concerned gets to see what's on offer. But last year Light Reading staged an exercise in which four vendors responded to a simplified RFI (Request for Information) for part of a hypothetical pan-European backbone dubbed Euro 1. Their proposals were presented at our Lightspeed Europe conference in December.

Stuart Barnes, entrepreneur in residence at Atlas Venture and a former guru of transmission technology at Alcatel SA (NYSE: ALA; Paris: CGEP:PA), put together the original RFI and chaired the conference session. Afterwards, he provided an analysis of the vendors' proposals, which is presented in this report.

First off, Light Reading would like to thank Stuart Barnes for all the work he put into this project and thank the vendors for being good sports and participating in this exercise. The individuals involved were:

Here's a hyperlinked summary of the report: — Introduction by Craig Williamson, Associate Editor, Light Reading
http://www.lightreading.com
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dodo 12/4/2012 | 10:48:47 PM
re: Long-Haul WDM: RFI Exercise "The future for these main nodes would be the OPTera Connect PX Photonic Switch that provides all-optical switching capability based upon micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) (see Optical Crossconnects "

Now that the project has been mothballed, it would be interesting to know what would be the final solution.

perry1961 12/4/2012 | 10:48:46 PM
re: Long-Haul WDM: RFI Exercise So we can see how Tellium's hybrid switch looks.
I wonder why it wasn't included in their year 2/3 proposal?
zweisel 12/4/2012 | 10:48:39 PM
re: Long-Haul WDM: RFI Exercise sad to say but Tellium is dead unless it gets bought out.given that photonic switches seem to have lost their luster, OEO switches seem to be the norm and work quite well thank you very much.
trixie 12/4/2012 | 10:48:38 PM
re: Long-Haul WDM: RFI Exercise I'm going to side with Perry on this one, not so much out of company loyalty, as common sense.

A hybrid crossconnect architecture makes a lot of sense, given the reach capabilities of current transport systems, along with the ever-decreasing insertion loss of photonic switches. in the future, as GMPLS control planes emerge, it would be possible to have a single control plane for both SONET and photonic traffic layers.

Add to that the flexibility of transparent switching, enabling express traffic of either 10G or 40G through any given port, along with the inherently lower cost of OOO (not necessarily MEMs, which cost a fortune, currently) and you have a reasonably strong arguement to use PXCs. Drop traffic still needs grooming, and your hybrid is born (or spawned, your call).

That's not to say that this is the correct answer for every implementation, but in this case, and others where significant express routing is required, it may be the best overall low cost solution.

Yes, there are practical issues today, which make it appear the 10G opaque switching is the foolproof approach, however, since this is a "what-if" scenario, let's let the assumptions swing both ways...

Both electronic grooming and wavelength grooming will be needed in the future- the question really is: when?

Do you really want to terminate 50,000 DS1's in a POP? Most likely not- some will be agregated to other higher bit rate pipes, while others may stay at the wavelength layer. They simply aren't needed at that particular site.

It's not about who will win, OEO or OOO, they will be complimentary. You will need both functionalities.

fanfare 12/4/2012 | 10:48:38 PM
re: Long-Haul WDM: RFI Exercise Tellium switch is OEO.
mpl 12/4/2012 | 10:48:34 PM
re: Long-Haul WDM: RFI Exercise Assuming the OC 192 camps are victorious, the following will be certain:

More wavelengths/fiber and or more fibers/route will be needed.

DWDM gear will see a resurgence in demand.

Multiplexers, tunable lasers, and transceivers will all see a pick up in demand.

Dispersion control in OC 192 systems will not be as critical as it is for OC 768 networks. OC 768 has a 16 fold increase in dispersion compared to OC 192 and this drastically reduces transmission distances which increases the need for regeneration.

As far as the major costs of regeneration/amplification are concerned, I believe that Raman amplification will win greater acceptance in any future networks as wavelengths continue to multiply. This is further evidenced by the fact that all the respondents (Nortel, Lucent, Ciena, and Fujitsu/Tellium) included Raman amplification in their proposals.


melao 12/4/2012 | 10:48:17 PM
re: Long-Haul WDM: RFI Exercise "


"The future for these main nodes would be the OPTera Connect PX Photonic Switch that provides all-optical switching capability based upon micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) (see Optical Crossconnects "

Now that the project has been mothballed, it would be interesting to know what would be the final solution."

Nortel is DAMN crazy. They just stop the development of PX and they show it on the RFI. Unless they want to retake the development, they are NUTS! NUTS!

zhao_jq 12/4/2012 | 10:48:01 PM
re: Long-Haul WDM: RFI Exercise I think that the working capacity of Section E-A in year 3 should be 280 and A-B should be 480.And I don't know how to protect the section A-B in year 3 proposal?
dave77777 12/4/2012 | 10:47:39 PM
re: Long-Haul WDM: RFI Exercise CORV is the undisputed leader in ULH/LH technology (altho not market share). Without them, this study loses most of its relevance.
simontemplar 12/4/2012 | 10:47:35 PM
re: Long-Haul WDM: RFI Exercise dave77777???

That wouldn't be Huber, dave Huber?
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