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Former Ceyba CEO Joins Redback

It's getting to be one big Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO) reunion over at Redback Networks Inc. (Nasdaq: RBAK), as Scott Marshall joined the company this week as senior VP of engineering.

Marshall was previously a Cisco VP in charge of a bevy of operations, including several on the access/edge front (see Redback Appoints New Execs). His time at Cisco overlapped that of Redback CEO Kevin DeNuccio and sales senior VP Georges Antoun.

He's more familiar to Light Readers as the head of long-haul startup Ceyba Corp., which was closed by investors last year after a venture capital firm backed out of an upcoming funding round. Marshall, who joined in 2001 when Ceyba was called Solinet, stayed optimistic until just before the bitter end (see Solinet Gets CEO From Cisco, Ceyba Rattling in Ottawa, and Ceyba Shuts Down).

His timing could be better, as Redback is about to announce a disappointing September quarter (see Earnings Warning Turns Redback Blue). Marshall is characteristically unfazed. "The general trend is that things are picking up [in carrier spending], but it won't necessarily be a straight line," he says.

Marshall's arrival doesn't seem to herald any major changes in Redback's plans. One source says Ravi Chandra, the departing senior VP of engineering, prefers the early phases of startup life and had already arranged for his departure. Chandra is still at Redback but wasn't available for comment.

Meanwhile, Marshall doesn't seem to be too traumatized by the Ceyba experience, and he seems to have made good on his last prediction to Light Reading. "I did some good snow skiing in the winter and some good water skiing in the summer," he says.

Separately, Redback also hired Arpit Joshipura as the head of product management and product marketing, reporting to Marshall. Joshipura hails from Ciena Corp. (Nasdaq: CIEN).

— Craig Matsumoto, Senior Editor, Light Reading

dljvjbsl 12/5/2012 | 1:12:31 AM
re: Former Ceyba CEO Joins Redback Marshall's experience at Cisco and Mitel were in areas that were concerned with end user services. His experience is those places would seem to be of more importance than the networking technology that he worked on at Ceyba and Newbridge. This could be a good sign that this industry is now more concerned with supplying value to customers than pushing esoteric technology.
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