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Five Hot Technologies for 2007

Dan Jones
LR Mobile News Analysis
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor
12/29/2006

The year 2007 will see several much-hyped wireless technologies make the jump from slideware to the real world. Most of you already know about WiMax's prospects for next year, so Unstrung decided to highlight some radio waves less traveled for its rundown of hot technology for 2007.

Ultra-wideband: After years of hype, UWB looks like it could actually matter in 2007. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has just started to approve high-speed, short-range "cable replacement" wireless products using UWB chipsets that can transfer data at speeds of up to 1 Gbit/s over several feet. UWB also has more industry backing than before since it is the radio muscle behind both the "Bluetooth 2" and "Wireless USB" specifications. It is easy to imagine that Apple Inc. (Nasdaq: AAPL), Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT), and others may also look at UWB as a way of speeding up the wireless transfer of multimedia between portable MP3 and video players and a home PC in future generations of such devices.(See UWB: Hot Chips?.)

Fixed/Mobile Convergence: It's 2007 or bust for fixed/mobile convergence (FMC) services. Handsets that can support both cellular and WiFi connections are finally starting to be widely available. Carriers such as BT Group plc (NYSE: BT; London: BTA) and T-Mobile US Inc. have launched FMC services and other carriers are testing the technologies. Unlicensed Mobile Access (UMA) remains the key technology behind early FMC, although other systems such as that offered by DiVitas Networks Inc. could still make a splash in the enterprise market. (See The Year of Calling Convergedly.)

Cellphone Security: Cellphone virus protection and security software will become a bigger issue next year. There has already been plenty of evidence of smartphone operating systems, such as the Symbian Ltd. OS, being targeted and there is talk of malicious code being spread via Bluetooth connections. So expect to see more smartphone security software on the market next year in a bid to address these mobile worries. (See Device Lockdown and The Blue Flu?.)

Business Buddies: The mildly creepy practice of mapping your friends's locations using GPS has started to become popular in the consumer market via offerings from Boost Mobile and Helio Inc. Unstrung expects that such buddy tracking applications could spread to the enterprise market over the course of 2007. Naturally, GPS and other cellular tracking mechanisms aren't accurate enough to get a reasonable fix on workers indoors. Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO), Newbury Networks and others, however, have appliances that can triangulate a WiFi radio's position reasonably accurately and with more and more devices getting on the WiFi bandwagon it is soon going to be easier to know when you've left your cube for a little 'me' time. (See In Depth: Real-Time Location Services.) CDMA Rev C: It may seem early to talk about CDMA Ev-DO Revision C as a technology that will matter in 2007 -- after all Sprint Corp. (NYSE: S) and Verizon Wireless are just starting to deploy Rev A networks. But it will become important from a marketing perspective later in 2007. Consider the fact that Sprint and now Clearwire LLC (Nasdaq: CLWR) are planning a move to mobile WiMax late in 2007 and throughout 2008. Unless Verizon goes on a wireless bandwidth buying spree it doesn't have suitable spectrum to follow them down the WiMax path. So talking up the capabilities of the 280-Mbit/s OFDM-based Rev C could start to make sense as faster mobile WiMax rolls around. (See Yay! More Acronyms!)

— Dan Jones, Site Editor, Unstrung

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phillipwolfe
phillipwolfe
12/5/2012 | 3:17:09 PM
re: Five Hot Technologies for 2007
The took WiMax/mobileWiMax training from Award Solutions and the guys are sharp. I would like everyone to refer to an excellent public domain document issued by Motorola, the venerable radio networks company that builds these systems for the large carriers. Please see here:
http://www.cdg.org/resources/w...

I have a copy if the weblink does not work for you.

I would also like to point out that OFDM is a technique that enables any wirleess carrier CDMA, wirless Point to Point, an "orthogonal" method of frequency modulation. It is a sampling technique driven by the software embedded on the hardware.

Another company called Microstar Labs www.mstarlabs.com demonstrates the issue of sampling analog signals and converting them into digital signals in real time for signal analysis. I use this analogy to demonstate the analog designers use many tools to capture and digitize a signal with high speed advanced sampling techniques.

So there really is no reason to argue on CDMA, MIMO, OFDM, etc. They are all tools used by carriers to maximize their ability to offer voice and data services.

P. Wolfe
dickroy
dickroy
12/5/2012 | 3:31:23 AM
re: Five Hot Technologies for 2007
In Dan Jones' article on 5 Hot Technologies for 2007 he writes:

"CDMA Rev C: It may seem early to talk about CDMA Ev-DO Revision C as a technology that will matter in 2007 -- after all Sprint Nextel Corp. (NYSE: S - message board) and Verizon Wireless are just starting to deploy Rev A networks. But it will become important from a marketing perspective later in 2007. Consider the fact that Sprint and now Clearwire LLC are planning a move to mobile WiMax late in 2007 and throughout 2008. Unless Verizon goes on a wireless bandwidth buying spree it doesn't have suitable spectrum to follow them down the WiMax path. So talking up the capabilities of the 280-Mbit/s OFDM-based Rev C could start to make sense as faster mobile WiMax rolls around. (See Yay! More Acronyms!)"

If it is true that CDMA Rev C is OFDM-based, then Qualcomm MUST get the award for the best marketing campaign of the last 10,000 years. I can't wait to hear their rationale for making such a bold claim. CDMA and OFDM are at completely OPPOSITE ends of the spectrum when it comes to modulation techniques for transmitting information through a channel, and OFDM's technical superiority in wireless applications explains why Qualcomm bought Flarion.
joset01
joset01
12/5/2012 | 3:31:21 AM
re: Five Hot Technologies for 2007
As far as I know Qualcomm hasn't made that claim. The CDMA Development Group says that Rev C implements OFDM techniques, along with MIMO, to up the data rates.

There isn't a huge amount of info out there at the moment on Rev C, but this training blurb apparently lays out more on how its is used.

http://www.awardsolutions.com/...

And I quote, "1xEV-DO (Rev C) is an evolution of the 1xEV-DO air interface that leverages the power of OFDM and MIMO technologies to provide significantly higher data rates (over 100 Mbps). As a result, wireless operators can offer a rich user experience by supporting advanced multimedia applications."

You are, however, naturally right to be skeptical. I'll look into it some more and watch for more data on this. For now, however, it seems fair to describe it as OFDM-based or at the very least something that uses OFDM.

Dan
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