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Cloud Native/NFV

Security Concerns Not Slowing Cloud Adoption – Study

Despite security concerns about the cloud, businesses executives and IT leaders still plan to continue to adopt the technology, with more than half of all critical enterprise data moving there by 2019, according to a recent report.

The study, conducted by analytics firm Teradata, found that nearly 80% of executives are concerned about cloud security, but that will not stop them from moving more data off-premises in the next two years.

By 2019, 56% of IT data, 53% of customer data and 51% of financial data will have moved to the cloud, according to the report, which is based on answers from nearly 900 respondents in nine different countries. The survey was conducted in January.

Security is often a concern for IT professionals and CIOs when considering moving to the cloud, especially as vendors such as Amazon, Microsoft and Google are offering more and more enterprise-grade services to get customers to move their data. (See AWS Tops in Public Cloud, but Azure Is Catching Up.)

On Enterprise Cloud News, contributor Andrew Froehlich wrote about how the recent WikiLeaks and Yahoo hacks should give the whole IT community pause about the overall safety of the cloud. (See Vault 7, Yahoo Hack Cast Doubt on Cloud Security.)

No rest for the security weary (Source: ChadoNihi via Pixabay)
No rest for the security weary (Source: ChadoNihi via Pixabay)

Despite embracing the cloud on one side, security still keeps IT up at night. The Teradata report found that:

  • 40% of respondents reported that general security is a risk
  • 25% believe that cloud data adoption will mean more security breaches
  • about a quarter of those surveyed said cloud adoption will mean less control
  • 22% are struggling with staffing as cloud adoption increases

The study found that two of the biggest adopters of cloud technologies are the healthcare industry and telecom. In the next two years, about 60% of those surveyed believe that healthcare will move more of its data to the cloud.


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On the other side, 48% reported that telecom will increase its cloud storage capacity in the next two years to keep up with demand.

However, one group is winning to keep its data out of the cloud: lawyers. The survey found that only 27% plan to move legal data to the cloud. The rest will remain in house to keep those billable hours going.

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— Scott Ferguson, Editor, Enterprise Cloud News. Follow him on Twitter @sferguson_LR.

Joe Stanganelli 4/21/2017 | 7:39:14 PM
Re: Security & lawyers > If you are a CIO, security is always going to be top of mind. It's part of the job.

@danielcawrey: In some ways, this is -- debatably -- not the case.

Many have made the compelling argument that CISOs/CSOs should not answer to the CIO or be under the CIO's budget because of the CIO's inherent conflict of interest with the office and mission of the CISO.  Budgetary concerns about keeping the lights on and innovating often are at odds with security issues.  In many organizations, CISOs are increasingly reporting to the CFO, the general counsel, or other executives.
Joe Stanganelli 4/21/2017 | 7:37:26 PM
Re: Security & lawyers @Scott: I would say that there was a time a few years ago where the healthcare and life sciences sector was slow to adopt this technology (largely because of regulatory issues).  That reluctance has lessened a bit -- largely because of the increased attention to these regulatory concerns.

In what I am seeing, however, the financial services sector is further behind in adopting upgraded solutions in many ways because (1) their regulatory burdens are, arguably, much greater than the healthcare/life sci. sector, and (2) financial services isn't getting nearly the market attention that healthcare and the life sciences are.

My two cents based on my personal experience and what I've been seeing.
kq4ym 4/17/2017 | 3:29:28 PM
Re: Security & lawyers It would seem natural that healthcare folks would be very concerned about security issues yet they are coming aboard with just a bit hesitation it seems. As " 60% of those surveyed believe that healthcare will move more of its data to the cloud," that would be a good omen that even that industry is moving forward to the cloud for its data in coming years.
Scott_Ferguson 4/11/2017 | 11:55:20 AM
Re: Security & lawyers @danielcawrey: I think security right now is an important issue for just about everyone in the IT department, as well as others, like legal, CFO and CEO. In case of the cloud, the security is only as good as the service provider. A lot depends on what they offer in terms of how to protect data in the public cloud. For some businesses that might work, for others, they might want more protection. It's got to be part of the larger plan.
danielcawrey 4/8/2017 | 4:21:26 PM
Re: Security & lawyers If you are a CIO, security is always going to be top of mind. It's part of the job. 

It could be argued any new technology would bring security concerns. Of course, cloud technology has been around for some time already. As a result, maybe there is something to be said about possible vulnerabilities?
Scott_Ferguson 4/7/2017 | 12:59:33 PM
Re: Security & lawyers @Joe: A couple of things to unpack here. In survey after survey, whether it's vendor sponsored or not, security ranks as the highest concer, even more now than budget, so I think if you had a side by side, you'd see security rank number one even if the company doesn't have a cloud plan.

Now, the thing about lawyers, and jokes aside, I was surprised to see that because it's been healthcare that's been the furthest behind on adopting technology, but with the cloud, that industry is really starting to move ahead.

 
Joe Stanganelli 4/7/2017 | 12:37:27 PM
Security & lawyers "The study, conducted by analytics firm Teradata, found that nearly 80% of executives are concerned about cloud security, but that will not stop them from moving more data off-premises in the next two years."

I think most everybody is concerned about security regardless.  I'd like to see a side-by-side comparison of those same executives' concerns about on-prem security.  At this point, it's rather a matter of security concerns wearing different hats.

As for the bit about lawyers and legal data, it has nothing to do with billable hours (indeed, dealing with anything administrative generally = not billable).  It's more a matter of lawyers being highly regulated in and of themselves as a profession -- and that sector isn't as sexy to cloud providers as, say, healthcare and pharmaceuticals are in addressing their compliance and liability needs.
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