x
Cloud Native/NFV

AWS GuardDuty Looks to Lock Down Cloud Security

While Amazon Web Services is considered the undisputed leader in public cloud services, the company continues to make improvements to its platform. Security is now the next step.

At its re:Invent 2017 customer showcase in Las Vegas this week, Amazon Web Services Inc. unveiled its new security service called GuardDuty, which it developed in cooperation with CrowdStrike and Proofpoint.

The GuardDuty service is enabled through the AWS Management Console. Once activated, the service can "immediately begin analyzing API calls and network activity across their accounts to establish a baseline of 'normal' account activity," according to Amazon.

A more complete security package
(Source: Amazon)
A more complete security package
(Source: Amazon)

However, AWS GuardDuty is not meant to be a standalone security product. Instead, it adds an extra layer of protection to the customer's existing security infrastructure. What Amazon is providing is an additional layer of scale, as well as the ability for security pros to help find account-based threats, which can be difficult to detect.


Keep up with the latest enterprise cloud news and insights. Sign up for the weekly Enterprise Cloud News newsletter.


In addition to GuardDuty, AWS rolled out a number of other features at the re:Invent show, including PrivateLink, a private network service that allows developers to create private endpoints to users. This adds another level of security by eliminating the need to expose data to the public Internet. (See Amazon Launches AWS PrivateLink for Private Cloud Connections.)

For additional information about AWS security and what it means for cloud customers, visit ECN's sister site Security Now.

Related posts:

— Scott Ferguson, Editor, Enterprise Cloud News. Follow him on Twitter @sferguson_LR.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Michelle 1/15/2018 | 1:26:24 PM
Re: How many layers of protection are necessary? Indeed, they are. I suspect researchers will find a number of hardware-based vulnerabilities in the future. Hardware wasn't always a target so there's plenty of opportunity to improve it going forward.
mhhfive 1/9/2018 | 2:59:34 PM
Re: How many layers of protection are necessary? > "bad guys are working on exploits now..."

They always are.. Perhaps we need to work on the economics of incentives so that it's not worth their time to do so? 

There are going to be a lot of insecure old PCs in the hands of consumers for the foreseeable future.... 
Michelle 1/8/2018 | 6:18:33 PM
Re: How many layers of protection are necessary? If nothing has come of the vulnerability yet, there's still time! I wonder how many bad guys are working on exploits now. Seems like the right move for the wrong side.
mhhfive 1/7/2018 | 9:12:46 PM
Re: How many layers of protection are necessary? Well. Unless anyone subscribes to conspiracy theories that these flaws were intentionally put into chips by the US government or whatnot....
mhhfive 1/7/2018 | 9:11:29 PM
Re: How many layers of protection are necessary? Has anyone even developed a way of knowing whether or not Meltdown/Spectre attacks have been committed? Do these attacks leave traces -- besides the malware that would presumably be needed to execute them? Even then, could anyone be sure that the bad guys didn't just cover their tracks? Otoh, this attack vector seems to be relatively new to researchers who also presumably are ahead of at least some bad guys.
Michelle 1/7/2018 | 5:05:36 PM
Re: How many layers of protection are necessary? Indeed. No known attacks have been reported yet, right? I haven't read anything about data loss in the wild.
mhhfive 1/4/2018 | 10:00:51 PM
Re: How many layers of protection are necessary? And now with the recent security flaws (Meltdown/Spectre) with almost every cloud using Intel (and perhaps even AMD and ARM) -- it gets harder and harder to keep anything secure.
Michelle 1/4/2018 | 9:05:53 PM
Re: How many layers of protection are necessary? You're probably right. I'm sure that would be the case for another service if it were as popular as AWS. People make mistakes...
mhhfive 1/2/2018 | 2:50:29 PM
Re: How many layers of protection are necessary? This isn't just a problem for AWS.. it's just that AWS has such dominant marketshare that it seems like AWS is the only one with this problem. I'm pretty sure if other cloud services were used as widely, there would also be customers doing dumb things with default settings and releasing data inadvertantly.
Michelle 12/31/2017 | 10:57:49 PM
Re: How many layers of protection are necessary? This seems to solve a problem in AWS. I'm really curious to learn more about amazon's plans to save customers from themselves. Far too many large data dumps have come from poor data management within an AWS instance. 
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
HOME
Sign In
SEARCH
CLOSE
MORE
CLOSE