& cplSiteName &

IBM Cloud Private Extends Big Blue's Hybrid Reach

Scott Ferguson
11/1/2017
50%
50%

IBM is looking to use its clout in the private cloud market to make it easier for more customers to create hybrid and multi-cloud cloud deployments with a new software platform called Cloud Private.

IBM originally released Cloud Private to a limited number of enterprise customers in late June. Now, Big Blue is planning to release the platform to a larger number of customers, especially those that are interested in keeping some data hosted on-premises but also want the types of features a public cloud infrastructure offers.

With Cloud Private, IBM is specifically targeting users of the company's middleware, including WebSphere, Liberty, Db2 and MQ, to allow them to keep certain data out of the public cloud sphere. For instance, an airline can keep frequent flyer and other data in the private cloud, but take advantage of a mobile app that is hosted in a public infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) platform

However, in order to ensure apps and workloads can be portable and offer scalability, especially in cloud-native environments, IBM is also integrating container technology from Docker, along with the Google-backed Kubernetes management and orchestration platform.

Seeing a hybrid world
(Source: IBM)
Seeing a hybrid world
(Source: IBM)

"We essentially want to enable our enterprise customers to be able to install a cloud and get all the benefits, including the elasticity, the scalability and resilience that they can get in our public cloud in a private cloud that is behind their firewall," Robin Hernandez, director of IBM Cloud Private Offering Management, told Enterprise Cloud News before the November 1 announcement. "Here, they can still protect their data and applications and still have quite a bit of control over those workloads and how they are being deployed and managed."

Hernandez noted that customers have been consistently asking for a hybrid approach to cloud and IBM sees a $50 billion opportunity in the private cloud market. She added: "It will also integrate with our public cloud because we do see that a lot of these customers want a multi-cloud strategy or a hybrid cloud and they don't want to be boxed into any one deployment model.

"Our enterprise customers have been telling us that for different workloads they have different needs. Some are transient and require scalability and they want to put those on the public cloud and others are mission critical with data and they want those behind the firewall.

Specifically, Hernandez said IBM has seen interest from enterprises in highly regulated industries, including healthcare, financial services, airlines, as well as government.

Although not as large as Microsoft Azure or Amazon Web Service (AWS) in the public cloud space, a recent report by Synergy Research found that IBM is a major provider of private cloud services, making the company the third-largest overall cloud provider. (See Microsoft Growing Explosively, but Amazon Retains Huge Cloud Lead.)


Keep up with the latest enterprise cloud news and insights. Sign up for the weekly Enterprise Cloud News newsletter.


By focusing on the middleware part of the software stack, IBM is looking to distinguish itself from other hybrid offerings, including Microsoft's Azure Stack, which is Redmond's answer to hybrid. (See Microsoft Azure Stack, SQL Server 2017 Emphasize Hybrid Cloud.)

"Cloud Private is a natural and necessary step for IBM to take in evolving IBM Cloud," Charles King, an analyst with PundIT Research, wrote in an email. "In essence, the company has added easy to use and simple to manage private cloud functions to core IBM solutions, including Db2, Websphere and MQ messaging that its customers already have deployed. As a result, Cloud Private is more of an extension of the value of customers' existing IBM investments rather than being a new, on-premises cloud platform offering like Microsoft's Azure Stack."

IBM Cloud Private
(Source: IBM)
IBM Cloud Private
(Source: IBM)

IBM plans to integrate Cloud Private with its own hardware, including its hyperconverged offering, the System z mainframe and Power Systems. The company also has third-party hardware partners including Cisco, Dell EMC, Intel, Lenovo and NetApp.

Customers would also be able to deploy Cloud Private through VMware, Canonical, OpenStack, as well as bare-metal servers.

Besides Db2, IBM also plans to support other databases, including MongoDB and PostgreSQL. There's also additional support for a number of DevOps and other developer tools, including several open source ones.

Finally, IBM is adding several layers of security, including data encryption, privileged access tool and the company's Security Vulnerability Advisor, which scans containers across multiple cloud.

IBM had previously offered a similar approach to hybrid cloud called Bluemix Local, which Cloud Private now replaces.

Related posts:

— Scott Ferguson, Editor, Enterprise Cloud News. Follow him on Twitter @sferguson_LR.

(1)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
More Blogs from Scott Ferguson
From its roots in industrial farm machinery and other equipment, John Deere has always looked for a technological edge. About 20 years ago, it was GPS and then 4G LTE. Now it's turning its attention to AI, machine learning and IoT.
Artificial intelligence and automation will become more integral to the enterprise, and 90% of all apps will have integrated AI capabilities by 2020, according to Oracle CEO Mark Hurd.
IBM is now offering access to Nvidia's Tesla V100 GPUs through its cloud offerings to help accelerate AI, HPC and other high-throughput workloads.
CIO Rhonda Gass is spearheading an effort to bring more automation and IoT to the factories making Stanley Black & Decker tools and other equipment.
Workday is looking to build out its machine learning and artificial intelligence capabilities with the acquisition of startup SkipFlag.
Featured Video
From The Founder
John Chambers is still as passionate about business and innovation as he ever was at Cisco, finds Steve Saunders.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
June 26, 2018, Nice, France
September 12, 2018, Los Angeles, CA
September 24-26, 2018, Westin Westminster, Denver
October 9, 2018, The Westin Times Square, New York
October 23, 2018, Georgia World Congress Centre, Atlanta, GA
November 7-8, 2018, London, United Kingdom
November 8, 2018, The Montcalm by Marble Arch, London
November 15, 2018, The Westin Times Square, New York
December 4-6, 2018, Lisbon, Portugal
All Upcoming Live Events
Hot Topics
Telco Job Prospects Go From Bad to Worse
Iain Morris, News Editor, 6/22/2018
Larry Ellison Laughed at the Cloud, Now the Cloud Is Laughing Back
Mitch Wagner, Executive Editor, Light Reading, 6/20/2018
Mavenir's Billion-Dollar Blueprint
Ray Le Maistre, Editor-in-Chief, 6/18/2018
5G Transport – Where Do We Start?
Ray Le Maistre, Editor-in-Chief, 6/21/2018
Animals with Phones
Backing Up Your Work Is Crucial Click Here
Live Digital Audio

A CSP's digital transformation involves so much more than technology. Crucial – and often most challenging – is the cultural transformation that goes along with it. As Sigma's Chief Technology Officer, Catherine Michel has extensive experience with technology as she leads the company's entire product portfolio and strategy. But she's also no stranger to merging technology and culture, having taken a company — Tribold — from inception to acquisition (by Sigma in 2013), and she continues to advise service providers on how to drive their own transformations. This impressive female leader and vocal advocate for other women in the industry will join Women in Comms for a live radio show to discuss all things digital transformation, including the cultural transformation that goes along with it.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed