Salesforce Service Cloud Gets Personal

Scott Ferguson
7/27/2017

With consumers of all types looking for a more personal experience, Salesforce is updating its Service Cloud platform to allow enterprises to quickly build these types of intimate responses that address customer needs.

Because enterprises are judged on the type of consumer experience they offer, it's critical for companies to connect to their customers, and allow their service reps a degree of freedom to build these personalized experiences into service desk platforms they work with each day, said Keith Pearce, vice president of marketing for Salesforce Service Cloud.

In order to allow sales reps this degree of freedom, Salesforce worked on creating a more agile platform to allow for faster application development and deployment, the productivity tools needed to create this layer of specialization, as well as the mobile experience to connect with consumers.

The point is to deliver a personalized experience to the consumer faster without having to necessarily wait for the IT department of a team of developers to tweak the platform to address consumer needs that change fast.

The updated Salesforce Service Cloud
(Source: Salesforce)
The updated Salesforce Service Cloud
(Source: Salesforce)

"The audience that our customers serve -- their customers -- is changing, and the consumer expectations are just skyrocketing around service experiences with connected products in the home, in the office, in the car or on your wrist, and these create these really personalized experiences," Pearce told Enterprise Cloud News.

What makes this complicated is that when it comes to the customer experience, banks don't compete against other banks anymore, Pearce said. Instead, a bank competes against the last customer experience a person has, whether that's with a retail chain, online shopping, an airline, a car dealership or something else.

"If your competition is the last service impression, you have got to be much faster to market," Pearce said.

To address this, Salesforce is adding four features to Service Cloud:

  • The first is Service Out-of-the-Box, which allows an enterprise to build its service center from Salesforce in one day. This feature streamlines setup, allowing the IT department, or even the a service rep, to build the platform without coding. It also allows the call center and service reps to connect to consumers through email, Facebook or Twitter, and build those feeds in the platform.
  • The second is the Lightning App Builder, a tool that allows reps to drag-and-drop new features into the platform as needed.
  • The third is the Lightning Service Console, which provides a unified desktop interface for customer reps. This not only provides dashboards, but can call up a customer's history, as well as offer federated search for internal and external documents.
  • And finally, Service Cloud Mobile, which works with Android and iOS, and connects reps to customers, and can also connect managers and in-house field representatives to help fulfill work orders for customers.


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While Pearce said he considers all these updates important to Salesforce, it's the out-of-the-box feature that is the most intriguing, allowing enterprises to build out its customer service offering quickly, and eliminate some of the older technologies in a call center that don't help with fast, agile development.

During the course of a year, Salesforce offers a number of different updates to Service Cloud, and these tie together. In the past year, the company has offered chat and messaging features that tie customer service into social media, and an update that brought the company's Einstein artificial intelligence to the platform.

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— Scott Ferguson, Editor, Enterprise Cloud News. Follow him on Twitter @sferguson_LR.

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maryam@impact
[email protected]
8/28/2017 | 2:59:41 PM
Re: Good addition
Michelle, it's a great question and the root of so much conflict in functional areas in business. Understanding the actual details and implications of roles can impact the productivity and efficiency of so many organizations.
Michelle
Michelle
8/24/2017 | 2:39:18 PM
Re: Good addition
@Maryam That makes me feel a little better about my encounters with people who have no idea how things work, but want to give out advice on how to do it... I try to be more understanding than those I work with -- don't you? I understand my unerstanding of something can vary from the actual nature of the job. Why don't more people do that???
maryam@impact
[email protected]
8/23/2017 | 2:07:13 PM
Re: Good addition
Michelle, I hear you there are so many misconceptions that create the patience, understanding the devil truly is the details help people understand it's not as easy as it looks. I once lead large scale sales events everyone thought it was like planning a party they didn't understand the logistics, legal issues, contracts, and approvals involved as well as budget management.
Michelle
Michelle
8/16/2017 | 9:39:04 PM
Re: Good addition
@Maryam Good for you! I wish I could do the same for people I've worked with over the years. They assume so much about the work I do -- none of the assumptions are correct. They're impatient too...
maryam@impact
[email protected]
8/16/2017 | 5:25:01 PM
Re: Good addition
I left a few associates in my shoes for a day they gladly left after that day. They didn't want to deal with all the interrelationships and possible issues, they thought marketing was just choosing pretty colors!
kq4ym
kq4ym
8/14/2017 | 6:01:27 PM
Re: blew up
It can only be a win win for the company with the idea " to deliver a personalized experience to the consumer faster without having to necessarily wait for the IT department." As competition grows among providers those that make tasks easier and faster for customers will surely be ahead of the game.
Michelle
Michelle
8/12/2017 | 2:04:11 PM
Re: Good addition
Agreed :) It seems super easy on the surface, but there's a lot to consider. I've even seen departments make awful mistakes because they don't really know what they're doing. They claim to be marketing experts, but they continually make rookie mistakes. They're overconfident and it ends badly.
maryam@impact
[email protected]
8/11/2017 | 7:11:32 PM
Re: Good addition
And also cause some major legal issues, not to mention the typo issues I have seen! Marketing is harder than it looks!
Michelle
Michelle
8/5/2017 | 2:15:30 PM
Re: Good addition
That would be best -- I have seen a lot of the same kind of issues with other departments given authority to send campaigns as they wish. People who don't regularly work in marketing/branding can easily miss the basics of brand usage and logo usage.
maryam@impact
[email protected]
8/2/2017 | 11:46:44 PM
Re: Good addition
I agree Michelle, I saw some very interesting campaigns sent out by my sales department before they were forbidden from doing their own marketing. Laden with legal issues, missing copyrights, and legal ease, spelling errors etc. it has happened at many organizations I have worked with throughout the years. I am sure there is some sort of governor on the Salesforce piece to get approvals and prevent such issues.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
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