Oracle Hiring 5,000 Cloud Pros in US

Scott Ferguson
8/28/2017
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Oracle has watched its cloud computing business grow over the last two years, and now the software and database giant is looking to hire about 5,000 cloud professionals in the US to continue that growth.

The positions that are now open include engineers, consultants, sales and support people for the company's cloud businesses, according to a statement released Monday. So far this year, Oracle has hired 2,650 cloud sales professionals and 1,500 cloud developers.

"We're hiring experienced sales and engineering professionals eager to contribute to Oracle's cloud growth and champion our products, Joyce Westerdahl, Oracle executive vice president for human resources, wrote in the August 28 statement. "We are also recruiting high-performing recent college graduates and offering them a world-class training program to prepare them for a career in the technology industry."

After falling behind in the cloud race, Oracle has looked to make up ground as quick as possible. When the company reported its fourth quarter financial results in June, it reported that its software-as-a-service (SaaS) business grew 75% year-over-year and topped the $1 billion mark for the first time. (See Oracle Earnings Soar on Cloud Growth .)

Come to the dark side
(Source: Oracle)
Come to the dark side
(Source: Oracle)

At the same time, Synergy Research found that while Amazon Web Services remains the overall cloud leader, thanks to its robust public cloud offering, Oracle, along with Alibaba Cloud, is one of the fast-growing cloud providers. (See AWS Public Cloud Dominance Continues – Report.)

Despite the hiring announcement, Oracle has been dogged over the last few months with stories about looming layoffs throughout the company as the cloud has presented opportunities, but has also gotten pressure to cut back in certain areas.

Oracle has not commented on these stories although it seems that the cuts have targeted its hardware division, as well as other legacy sections. (See Microsoft, Oracle Layoffs Loom as Companies Pursue Cloud Plans.)


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As of May, Oracle employed about 138,000 full-time employees, which includes 51,000 people in the US, and 87,000 internationally, according to the company's annual report filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission.

These numbers also include 8,000 people employed in its SaaS, infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) and platform-as-a-service (PaaS) operations.

Oracle is not the only legacy software provider looking to shift its focus to cloud, which also means letting some workers go, while hiring in other areas. One of the company's biggest rivals in the cloud, Microsoft, has also cut employees as it seeks a sleeker, more cloud-focused salesforce. (See Microsoft Cutting Jobs in Shift to Cloud.)

In Oracle's statement, the company did not make clear if these jobs are part of President Donald Trump's initiative to hire more workers within the US. Other large tech companies, including Intel, IBM and Apple, have signaled that they plan to hire more US-based workers within the next several years. (See Apple Responds to Trump, Touts 2M US Jobs.)

Related posts:

— Scott Ferguson, Editor, Enterprise Cloud News. Follow him on Twitter @sferguson_LR.

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Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Light Sabre
8/31/2017 | 11:06:55 PM
Re: hiring
Moving people around doesn't warrant a juicy hiring headline...
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Light Sabre
8/31/2017 | 11:05:31 PM
Re: hiring
done!

 

should I move into my new office tomorrow or wait until after the holiday?
maryam@impact
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[email protected],
User Rank: Light Sabre
8/30/2017 | 4:29:05 PM
Re: hiring
The truth is if they don't find them in in the US they will look abroad. That has been the case for decades in IT jobs. If the people don't exist with the skills then the companies will find the skills elsewhere, outsource, or look for workers with the skills in other countries they can bring to the US.
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Light Sabre
8/29/2017 | 1:23:54 PM
Re: hiring
Cue tens of thousands of people adding several references to "cloud" to their resumes and LI profiles.
Scott_Ferguson
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Scott_Ferguson,
User Rank: Light Beer
8/28/2017 | 2:08:52 PM
Re: hiring
@danielcawrey I have a feeling that Oracle might be moving some people out of roles and into these new cloud ones so it might be a net-neutral gain for Oracle and for the IT industry as a whole.

 
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Light Sabre
8/28/2017 | 1:36:20 PM
Re: hiring
I couldn't even imagine there's that many cloud professionals on the market looking for a job. 

But they might be now! Doing press like this sure does get the word out. 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Light Sabre
8/28/2017 | 12:41:37 PM
hiring
Nice to read some good news about the propsect for IT jobs.
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