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Earthquake Cuts Cables Near Taiwan

Craig Matsumoto
12/27/2006

Asia is suffering a major telecommunications break in the aftermath of an earthquake that hit Taiwan late on Dec. 26.

Several undersea cables were damaged by the magnitude-6.7 quake and might not be repaired for "two to three weeks," according to reports from the region. Taiwan initially lost some telephone connections to Japan and mainland China; some of that service has already been restored, Chunghwa Telecom Co. Ltd. (NYSE: CHT) told the Associated Press.

The wire service noted capacity reductions in phone or data service at some other big carriers in the region, including PCCW Ltd. (NYSE: PCW; Hong Kong: 0008) in Hong Kong and KDDI Corp. in Japan.

So far, two were killed and at least 40 were reported injured in the quake.

The U.S. Geological Survey maps show a magnitude-7.1 quake occurring off the southern tip of Taiwan at 8:26 p.m. in Taiwan on Dec. 26 (in Eastern time, that's 7:26 a.m. on Dec. 26). The location would be 55 miles south to southeast of the city of Kao-hsiung.

— Craig Matsumoto, Senior Editor, Light Reading

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dealing_right
dealing_right
12/5/2012 | 3:31:31 AM
re: Earthquake Cuts Cables Near Taiwan
Unable to access servers in US from India as well.
sfwriter
sfwriter
12/5/2012 | 3:31:29 AM
re: Earthquake Cuts Cables Near Taiwan
"Makes me wonder what will happen when the big one hits California. First thing everyone's going to do is try to log on to see what happened. Come to think of it, they'll probably check via cell phones first. that'll be a mess."

Craig, I can pretty much guarantee you that if the big one hits SF, your last thought will be logging on. When the 6.7 earthquake hit Northridge, it sounded like a subway train was running right through the middle of my home. Books flew off my shelves, crystal crashed out of my kitchen cabinets and onto the floor. I had landline phone service for about 5 minutes and then everything went dead - phone and electricity for the first 16 hours or so. We were still able to use cell phones, but in 1994, not very many people had them yet. The radios still worked, though. It's very surreal to go through something like that and hear Rick Dees pre-recorded broadcast like nothing in the world just happened.

But you're right, a big one in CA will have far-reaching impact around the world when it comes to the Internet.
Pete Baldwin
Pete Baldwin
12/5/2012 | 3:31:29 AM
re: Earthquake Cuts Cables Near Taiwan
Ah, thanks. Interesting that the effects were that far-reaching.

Makes me wonder what will happen when the big one hits California. First thing everyone's going to do is try to log on to see what happened. Come to think of it, they'll probably check via cell phones first. that'll be a mess.
beowulf888
beowulf888
12/5/2012 | 3:31:28 AM
re: Earthquake Cuts Cables Near Taiwan
Yeah, I was in LA during the Northridge quake. I remember sitting on the stoop of my apartment building at 5 in the morning with my neighbors listening to a battery-powered radio. The talk show host on the radio regularly lectured us not to tie up the phone lines because they were needed by emergency services, then he'd promptly take another call from his listeners -- who would yack about what they thought the quake would measure on the Richter scale or how many of their favorite chotchkes got smashed (!).

Later in the morning they brought on a psychologist on the radio show to counsel us all on how not to panic. When one of the bigger aftershocks hit, the guy freaked out on the radio. We all thought that was tremendously amusing.

--Beo



sfwriter wrote:
> Craig, I can pretty much guarantee you that if the big one hits SF, your last thought will be logging on. When the 6.7 earthquake hit Northridge, it sounded like a subway train was running right through the middle of my home. Books flew off my shelves, crystal crashed out of my kitchen cabinets and onto the floor. I had landline phone service for about 5 minutes and then everything went dead - phone and electricity for the first 16 hours or so. We were still able to use cell phones, but in 1994, not very many people had them yet. The radios still worked, though. It's very surreal to go through something like that and hear Rick Dees pre-recorded broadcast like nothing in the world just happened.

> But you're right, a big one in CA will have far-reaching impact around the world when it comes to the Internet.
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