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CableLabs Issues DOCSIS 3.0 Spec

Months later than originally expected, CableLabs has finally come out with its next-generation technical standard for cable broadband equipment.

In an announcement made Monday, CableLabs issued its DOCSIS 3.0 (Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification) standard, which cable operators around the world have been eagerly awaiting to hike their broadband speeds dramatically and increase their overall bandwidth. The public release of the new standard comes after industry engineers have spent the better part of two years drafting an upgrade to DOCSIS 2.0, the current gold standard for cable high-speed data service.

As expected, the new spec will enable cable operators to bond together four or more 6MHz channels to deliver much higher data speeds and much greater bandwidth to subscribers. Known as "channel-bonding" or "wideband," the approach will let cable systems offer shared downstream data rates of at least 160 Mbit/s and shared upstream speeds of at least 120 Mbit/s, more than 10 times faster than the highest data speeds now available to most cable modem and DSL subscribers.

Besides boosting broadband transmission rates, the DOCSIS 3.0 spec should make it far easier for the cable guys to offer such bandwidth-intensive services as digital video, high-definition TV (HDTV), digital video recording (DVR), and video-on-demand (VOD) through more efficient use of their current spectrum. In addition, the new standard should make it easier for MSOs to deliver such bandwidth-rich services as video conferencing to commercial customers.

Get the rest of the story at Cable Digital News.

— Alan Breznick, Site Editor, Cable Digital News

Mark Sebastyn 12/5/2012 | 3:45:23 AM
re: CableLabs Issues DOCSIS 3.0 Spec Can anyone point me at some data that illustrates the number of users that typicaly share a DOCSIS port? How many homes does a single thread of coax touch? I'm sure it varies by company and region but I'd like some ball park figures.
optiplayer 12/5/2012 | 3:45:22 AM
re: CableLabs Issues DOCSIS 3.0 Spec My understanding is that in real deployments a "typical" number used to be 4000 homes passed per DOCSIS port (eg 6 MHz channel). More recently, as broadband take rates have increased, that number is likely 2000 and dropping. This means roughly 4-5 HFC nodes per DOCSIS channel (assuming a typical HFC node passes 400-500 homes).

The CMTS market is accelerating again as the MSOs have made bandwidth a central part of their marketing campaign against DSL and as they position against FiOS. To increase bandwidth per user they need to cut the user per channel which means that it is likely that the number of homes passed per DOCSIS channel will fall to the 400-500 range which is good for Cisco, ARRIS and Motorola the leading CMTS providers.

Not sure what you mean by a single coax thread. Generally speaking, fiber is run to an HFC node then coax from there with each leg of coax serving 100-200 homes.
twill009 12/5/2012 | 3:45:22 AM
re: CableLabs Issues DOCSIS 3.0 Spec The info might be in this paper

"Experimental Evaluation of DOCSIS 1.1 Upstream Performance"

http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/ca...

In it, the authors say "Typically there are
1500 to 2000 CMs connected to a CMTS with distance between the CMTS and CM going up to 50 miles."

You might also check out this site:
http://www.ace-engineers.com/p...

optiplayer 12/5/2012 | 3:45:21 AM
re: CableLabs Issues DOCSIS 3.0 Spec My understanding is that in real deployments a "typical" number used to be 4000 homes passed per DOCSIS port (eg 6 MHz channel). More recently, as broadband take rates have increased, that number is likely 2000 and dropping. This means roughly 4-5 HFC nodes per DOCSIS channel (assuming a typical HFC node passes 400-500 homes).

The CMTS market is accelerating again as the MSOs have made bandwidth a central part of their marketing campaign against DSL and as they position against FiOS. To increase bandwidth per user they need to cut the user per channel which means that it is likely that the number of homes passed per DOCSIS channel will fall to the 400-500 range which is good for Cisco, ARRIS and Motorola the leading CMTS providers.

Not sure what you mean by a single coax thread. Generally speaking, fiber is run to an HFC node then coax from there with each leg of coax serving 100-200 homes.
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