x
Video services

TelcoTV Questions

10:35 AM -- For six years now, folks have been gathering at TelcoTV to chew over the "converging ecosystems of broadband and entertainment."

Our pals at Contentinople do this on a daily basis, to some degree, but they're more focused on the digital content lifecycle itself.

At TelcoTV, some things I hope to learn include:

  • Where exactly is the money in providing TV service to consumers? Is there really a lot of profit there considering what channels like ESPN are charging?

  • What can telcos provide to a consumer who says, "I don't want 500 channels. I just get access to stuff I want to watch."

  • Isn't it time to throw out the concept of TV schedules and just provide everything on demand? How are telcos working to make that happen?

  • The vast majority entertainment content produced now is high definition. Only about 1 percent of the channels available on my TV service are provided in high definition. Why? What's wrong with that picture?

  • When will AT&T admit that it's possible consumers will soon need more bandwidth than its FTTN strategy allows? Wouldn't it be great if the carrier wasn't forced to bet on a video compression miracle to save it from the upcoming strains of multi-room HD-DVRs?

As I scan the show floor looking for answers, I'll look to speak with Heavy Reading's chief analyst Graham Finnie, ascertain-ment founder and Contentinople contributor Lou Volpano, and a few dozen telco operators, too.

Meanwhile, if you have some quick answers (or better questions), let me know on the board below.

— Phil Harvey, Barely Managing Editor, Light Reading

Page 1 / 3   >   >>
Pete Baldwin 12/5/2012 | 3:00:19 PM
re: TelcoTV Questions > Isn't it time to throw out the concept of TV schedules and just provide everything on demand?

Excellent question (the answer probably being Yes.)

Hand in hand with that, although it's a bit beyond the LR purview: How does the TV "search" function change? If everything is on demand, and there are 500 channels to choose from, the channel-by-channel TV Guide format becomes less useful. Something closer to a search engine is called for.
Mark Sebastyn 12/5/2012 | 3:00:17 PM
re: TelcoTV Questions Explain to me how having more distributors of the same content allows the existing players to make more, not less money.

It's good for the people with content. Not good for the people selling it.

Sometimes the explanation is so simple people don't want to hear it.
rjmcmahon 12/5/2012 | 3:00:16 PM
re: TelcoTV Questions Explain to me how having more distributors of the same content allows the existing players to make more, not less money.

The only way it makes any sense to me is if the content is little more than ads and propaganda where mass distribution doesn't dilute but rather increases it's value. Think more religious; "God loves you so tithe to me", political; "War on blah, blah - people hate your freedom and want to kill you so vote for me to protect you", or consumerism; "Buy this junk so you'll feel better about yourself" type of stuff.

Laws of human psychology are different than laws of physics ;-)
spelurker 12/5/2012 | 3:00:16 PM
re: TelcoTV Questions > Hand in hand with that, although it's a bit beyond the LR purview: How does the TV
> "search" function change? If everything is on demand, and there are 500 channels
> to choose from, the channel-by-channel TV Guide format becomes less useful.
> Something closer to a search engine is called for.

There will always be a few things that are good at the scheduled broadcast time
(the world series/world cup, etc)

Beyond that, you'll need a "What's new" table (for regular serials, nightly news, newly added movies, etc)

And probably something like a search engine with genre categories (westerns, sci-fi, drama...) and ratings filters (don't tell me about "mature content", my 4 year old is in the room...).

And a cursor to scroll through all the results

You can still pipe adverts into half of the screen with this sort of interface, so our capitalist needs are still fulfilled.
rjmcmahon 12/5/2012 | 3:00:15 PM
re: TelcoTV Questions Look to books and magazines for working business models for on demand cand pay for content. Search/portals play only a small part in generating demand. Release windows still exist. Ads will subsidize most of the stuff so it will be mostly junk. The only way to get anything worthwhile will be to pay for it, something the internet generation doesn't really understand because they think the RIAA is the crook and their "sharing" of copyrighted works is ethical behavior.
rjmcmahon 12/5/2012 | 3:00:15 PM
re: TelcoTV Questions I like the idea of an ad-laden search page for IPTV.

It will be home shopping network on steriods. It's already starting. For us MTB riders, Trek is putting out video about their 2008 Fuel EX. Brake jack on the turns kills.

"Input from hard braking efforts (known as brake jack) also negatively affected early full suspension designs. When a rider hit the brakes, these early designs lost some of their ability to absorb bumps GÇö and this happened in situations where the rear suspension was needed most."

http://www.trekbikes.com/fuele...

Makes me want to buy one.

Every product imaginable will be advertised in every form possible. There will be no respite. Buy, Buy, Buy, Borrow, Borrow, Borrow, Print, Print, Print (money that is).
Pete Baldwin 12/5/2012 | 3:00:15 PM
re: TelcoTV Questions > There will always be a few things that are good at the scheduled broadcast time (the world series/world cup, etc)

Right, thanks. Meant to include a caveat for that.

I like the idea of an ad-laden search page for IPTV. That is, I don't *like* it as a consumer, but I bet providers give that a shot eventually.
delphi 12/5/2012 | 3:00:14 PM
re: TelcoTV Questions Sorry for entering this thread so late.

Everyone is bringing up issues that are really at least five years old, maybe more.

The issue is not around on-demand vs. scheduled broadcast; or even a guide page that is ad heavy.

The owners of popular content for mass market and niche are going to win big. That is go big or go specific - but have content people want.

Google is very vulnerable for ad revenue for search is not sticky video and entertainment is. Hence the youtube buy.

The key for our market (carriers) is to solve the on-demand and peer to peer service delivery cost issue on scalability with high def as the standard expectation.

It is not an access network issue (FTTN vs. FFTH) issue. It is a metro issue. Stacked Ethernet switching with meshed DWDM optical pipes is a cost killer.

The fact that there is not a next gen optical platform for metro which enables these new IP services is the stopper.

This is now too long so I will stop.
Mark Sebastyn 12/5/2012 | 3:00:11 PM
re: TelcoTV Questions All of this talk about consumerism makes me want to watch THX1138 all over again...
rjmcmahon 12/5/2012 | 3:00:11 PM
re: TelcoTV Questions All of this talk about consumerism makes me want to watch THX1138 all over again...

Haven't seen it, looks interesting.

Another way to get away from the consumerism is to get off the road bike and hit the trails ;-) You may end up on some ranch property like that of Chris True who puts up signs on saying "No Trespassing, unless you can outrun the bull" and the massive bull is staring you in the face, twenty feet away.

If you survive the bull then you can join the community and play some cow pie bingo.

"[Chris] True is best known outside the La Honda and Skyline area for his "Cow Pie Bingo" games to raise funds for schools and community services, both for the rural communities and Palo Alto and Menlo Park, among others.

The "bingo" game consists of creating a grid on a football or other field, having people "buy" certain squares and then leading a cow around until a cow pie emerges. The holder of the square with the cow pie is the winner."

http://www.paloaltoonline.com/...

Beats taking the kids for a McDonald's toy every time ;-)
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
HOME
Sign In
SEARCH
CLOSE
MORE
CLOSE