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Cable/Video

Livingston Chooses Allied Telesyn

Allied Telesyn Inc. says it has won some new business with Livingston Telephone Company, an IOC based in East Texas that supports about 9,000 access lines. The equipment vendor says Livingston chose its 7000 Series DSLAMs and will install its Rapier 24i, AT-9812, and AT-9816 Layer 3 switches at its television head-end.

The selection seems to be a bold one, given that Livingston has been a vocal reference account for its current access gear vendors. But, though Livingston had already been making the move to an IP network, it evidently found something in Allied Telesyn's equipment that promised an even more efficient network (see Allied Telesyn Debuts DSLAM Drama). Testing has been going on for a while, and installations are starting this week with the Layer 3 switches at Livingston's central office, says Navid Feizy, a systems engineer for Allied Telesyn.

Even with a credible technology story, the scrappy vendor may have tried a bit too hard on the PR front. In its press release, Allied Telesyn mentions the carrier will "gradually replace legacy triple play gear in its existing locations," a claim it later backed away from.

"Until now, Livingston Telephone has been using equipment from Alcatel SA (NYSE: ALA; Paris: CGEP:PA) and Riverstone Networks Inc. (Nasdaq: RSTN) to deploy triple play services," the release says. "As its video customer base has grown, however, the company hasn't been able to cost-effectively scale service."

Livingston's other triple-play equipment vendor is Advanced Fibre Communications Inc. (AFC) (Nasdaq: AFCI), which was not mentioned in Allied Telesyn's release but is referred to in Riverstone's Livingston case study (see Livingston Telephone: Making the Video Triple-Play - by Riverstone Networks Inc.).

The press release alleges that each new group of 32 customers served by Livingston's DSLAM locations "requires another Riverstone router, and with a 155 Mbit/s uplink to the network."

Riverstone disagrees. "To add another 32 customers you would need to add a new blade to the RS 8600 router," says Riverstone spokeswoman Jennifer Arculeo. "They would not need to add a new router."

She adds that Riverstone's understanding is that Livingston was not going to replace what's in its network now. "We thought they were using Allied Telesyn as eval[uation] gear," she says.

Alcatel opted not to spar. "Alcatel was pleased to be involved in this competitive process," writes an Alcatel spokesperson via email. "Though it is unfortunate for Alcatel that another vendor was chosen, we typically do not discuss the specifics of a particular RFP out of consideration to the service provider."

Livingston executives were unavailable for comment.

— Phil Harvey, Senior Editor, Light Reading

Iipoed 12/4/2012 | 11:45:11 PM
re: Livingston Chooses Allied Telesyn Why would a customer service oriented company (since they provide dial tone I guess they are customer oriented)Allied Telesyn is farther down the quality list than even Riverstoned. since their pricing is also 50% less than RSTN Livingston must be betting the stuff at next to nothing. No support, no technically proficient field sales engineers.
etherhead 12/4/2012 | 11:14:08 PM
re: Livingston Chooses Allied Telesyn don't bad you don't do any homework before you post.

They have a totally seperate group that makes and supports hardened Telco products, DSLAMs, with many times the resources of most of the other players. And have quite a few live Telco video networks; MTA, MWT, etc.

Nortel still makes small ethernet hubs as well, do you confuse those with a DMS100 Class 5? Probably so.
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