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DOCSIS

Comcast Speeds Past Qwest in Denver

Comcast Corp. (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK) is making the leap to Docsis 3.0 in Colorado, offering a 50-Mbit/s downstream "Extreme" tier that will compete with Denver-based Qwest Communications International Inc. (NYSE: Q).

The MSO said its wideband tier, which also delivers up to 10 Mbit/s upstream for $99.95 per month, is already available to more than half of the Denver metro, as well as parts of Southern and Northern Colorado. Comcast, which serves about 840,000 customers in the state and began the upgrades in late August, says it expects to offer Docsis 3.0 to the rest of the Denver metro by next month and extend the service to "most Mountain Communities" before the end of 2009.

Comcast is also introducing a new residential tier, "Ultra," offering 22 Mbit/s down by 5 Mbit/s up for $62.95. The operator is also doubling the downstream and upstream of its "Performance" tier to 12 Mbit/s down by 2 Mbit/s up for no extra cost. And it's upgrading existing "Performance Plus" customers to the "Blast!" tier, which doubles the downstream to 16 Mbit/s.

Comcast's new 50-Mbit/s tier will compete head-on with a new VDSL2 service from Qwest that pumps in 40 Mbit/s down and 20 Mbit/s upstream for an "introductory" price of $109.99 per month when bundled with the telco's phone service. Qwest has not yet said what percentage of its footprint is close enough to its central offices to get access to those speeds, but the telco has identified Denver (where it's headquartered) as one of the markets that's getting the 40/20 service. (See Qwest Attacks Comcast With 40 Mbit/s.)

Comcast has launched a 100 Mbit/s (downstream), Docsis 3.0-based commercial service tier in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn. The MSO has yet to debut it in additional cities, but has noted that it anticipates introducing it in other wideband-ready cable properties. That tier sells for $369.95 per month, and bundles in a 15 Mbit/s upstream to go with the Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) Communication Service (SharePoint and Outlook) and McAfee Inc. (NYSE: MFE)'s PC security suite. (See Comcast Gets Bizzy With 100-Meg Tier .)

Comcast will have 80 percent of its footprint -- roughly 40 million homes and businesses passed -- wideband-ready by the end of 2009. The MSO is expected to complete the job by the end of 2010.

But to help it foot the bill for the Docsis 3.0 upgrades, Comcast is reportedly increasing monthly cable modem fees from $3 to $5 in all its markets this fall.

— Jeff Baumgartner, Site Editor, Cable Digital News




Interested in learning more on this topic? Then come to TelcoTV 2009, the telecom industry’s premier event for the exploration of a comprehensive entertainment convergence strategy, to be staged in Orlando, Fla., November 10-12. For more information, or to register, click here.


grunt 12/5/2012 | 3:56:00 PM
re: Comcast Speeds Past Qwest in Denver

As a Comcast customer I am feeling a bit underwhelmed by all these speed claims.  When will we as consumers start to move the ISPs towards some quality metrics?  I supposedly have 8Mb/s service - and often do - but I also sometimes to often have 5-9% packet loss which is very bad for real time apps such as gaming and VoIP. 


The trouble is I have no recourse except to switch to a different SP who also will provide me with no quality assurance - only more claims of how 'fast' my connection might be. I could also call 'technical support' who will ask me if I have a router, ask me how many computers I have, and then ask me to connect directly to the cable modem, and reset everything etc..  and then tell me it must be my computer anyway.


I don’t need or want 50-100Mbits/sec - I need 1 or 2 Mbits/sec which really work well - and by the way that’s worth even more than my current occasional 8.

grunt 12/5/2012 | 3:56:00 PM
re: Comcast Speeds Past Qwest in Denver

As a Comcast customer I am feeling a bit underwhelmed by all these speed claims.  When will we as consumers start to move the ISPs towards some quality metrics?  I supposedly have 8Mb/s service - and often do - but I also sometimes to often have 5-9% packet loss which is very bad for real time apps such as gaming and VoIP. 


The trouble is I have no recourse except to switch to a different SP who also will provide me with no quality assurance - only more claims of how 'fast' my connection might be. I could also call 'technical support' who will ask me if I have a router, ask me how many computers I have, and then ask me to connect directly to the cable modem, and reset everything etc..  and then tell me it must be my computer anyway.


I don’t need or want 50-100Mbits/sec - I need 1 or 2 Mbits/sec which really work well - and by the way that’s worth even more than my current occasional 8.

Jeff Baumgartner 12/5/2012 | 3:55:47 PM
re: Comcast Speeds Past Qwest in Denver

We're still waiting on some of the US guys to offer guaranteed residential Docsis speeds, or at least something that can one-up traditional best effort offerings. But I just had an interesting conversation with Com Hem about some guarantees they've wrapped around their wideband services and I'll be sharing some of those details soon. Of course, this doesn't help you much, unless you're planning on moving to Sweden anytime soon.


Jeff


 

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