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Ultra-Broadband

Hitachi GPON Gets RUS Approval

Hitachi Telecom (USA) Inc. has become the first vendor to receive equipment approval through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Utilities Service (RUS) program, for a full-rate Gigabit passive optical networking (GPON) system. Hitachi's AMN1220 fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) system received product acceptance, according to RUS filings.

Hitachi says the product is the first full-rate GPON device to have received RUS approval. [Ed. note: The first in recent memory, anyway -- see Optical Solutions Gets RUS OK.] While there are other products that provide PON services, the AMN1220 is the only one to be fully compliant with ITU GPON standards and provide a full 1.2 Gbit/s upstream and 2.4 Gbit/s downstream, the vendor says.

The upshot is that the AMN1220 can be deployed in rural communities using loans and grants for advanced telecom equipment from the USDA -- so it'll have the U.S. Gummint's great telecom welfare program working in its favor.

"The main thing this shows is that we are committed to North America," says Hitachi VP Scott Wilkinson. While the loans are only good for small communities -- those with 20,000 residents or fewer -- Wilkinson says Hitachi intends to "gain market share wherever we can."

To gain RUS approval, a product generally has to be deployed for at least six months. According to Wilkinson, the AMN1220 is the only ITU-compliant GPON unit to have been deployed that long in the U.S. market.

Hitachi's first commercial deployments of the product began in Bandon, Ore., and Dumont, Iowa, in June 2006. The Dumont system was deployed by Dumont Telephone, while the Bandon deployment was led by ComSpanUSA and Ledcor Technical Services (LTS). In March, ComSpan and LTS agreed to extend that deployment to nearby Coquille, which is 17 miles away. (See Hitachi GPON Deployed in Iowa, Oregon Town Lights Up, and LTS, ComSpan Deploy Hitachi GPON.)

The RUS program was designed to help rural communities extend affordable broadband access. Since its inception, over 70 loans, for more than $1.2 billion, have been granted for broadband deployments in 36 states. While there's no info available on how much gear bought actually makes it into telecom networks, the program is a nice thing for the gear guys.

Those loans have helped spread broadband access to more than 500,000 households in 1,000 communities throughout the country that would have otherwise not have advanced telecom services available to them, according to USDA data.

— Ryan Lawler, Reporter, Light Reading

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DCITDave 12/5/2012 | 3:08:00 PM
re: Hitachi GPON Gets RUS Approval Does anyone thing RUS approval will make as big a difference in GPON as it did for things like cabinets, etc.
DCITDave 12/5/2012 | 3:07:59 PM
re: Hitachi GPON Gets RUS Approval re: Per LR's own site, Optical Solutions FiberPath 500 GPON product was awarded such status in 2003... "

They were the first to call their products GPON. But there wasn't a standard definition of GPON back then, was there?
Fotons 12/5/2012 | 3:07:59 PM
re: Hitachi GPON Gets RUS Approval First of all, the leading sentence under this article's title on the main LR page is misleading and therefore incorrect:

"The AMN1220 becomes the first GPON unit to receive USDA Rural Utilities Service acceptance..."

Per LR's own site, Optical Solutions FiberPath 500 GPON product was awarded such status in 2003:

http://www.lightreading.com/do...

There may be other GPON equipment types that are RUS approved as well, but in any case the omission of "full-rate" creates a misleading tease for the article.

That said, RUS listing will be very helpful for any vendor seeking to sell to 3rd tier carriers. The 3rd tier carriers tend to pay more, tend to demand less, and (some of them) are more technically daring than the RBOCs. Many of them won't upgrade without an RUS loan.

Example from http://freenet.msp.mn.us/peopl... "Without RUS support, East Otter Tail says it would be unlikely to proceed with further implementation of the FTTH network."

3rd tier carriers therefore make an important lab for proving in equipment before exposing it to the greater challenges of 2nd and 1st tier networks. They can also be more profitable on a unit basis owing to their limited negotiating leverage.

Cheers.
rjmcmahon 12/5/2012 | 3:07:58 PM
re: Hitachi GPON Gets RUS Approval According to the article

"Those loans have helped spread broadband access to more than 500,000 households in 1,000 communities throughout the country that would have otherwise not have advanced telecom services available to them, according to USDA data."

And the experts reporting for and reading an industry trade site like LR don't bat an eye.

RUS needs to raise the bar. So do the rest of us. Claiming advanced telecom services, using the FCC's defintion of broadband, at $2400 per household is NOT something to be proud of. Maybe we can take somes lessons from previous generations who actually advanced our society.

"Here is an opportunity to do a big, basic work, such as comes to few in the course of a lifetime. The individual who fails to vision the importance of the task has no moral right to hold a position of authority in its performance."
- Thomas H. MacDonald, Chief, Bureau of Public Roads, December 1921


"I think by far the most important bill in our whole code, is that for the diffusion of knowledge among the people. No other sure foundation can be devised for the preservation of freedom and happiness.

...Preach, my dear Sir, a crusade against ignorance; establish and improve the law for educating the common people."
-Thomas Jefferson August 1786


A universal broadband platform will be anchored by knowledge diffusion. The diffusion won't be bounded by time or place. It's our chance to do something of real value. Doing so requires taking some risk (and maybe even a loan default or two.)
paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 3:07:58 PM
re: Hitachi GPON Gets RUS Approval
Yes there were standards in place in 2003. Like all standards, GPON has been extended, clarified and updated since 2003.

seven
DCITDave 12/5/2012 | 3:07:57 PM
re: Hitachi GPON Gets RUS Approval So maybe Hitachi wasn't the first? Gulp.
I'll adjust the article.

Thanks,
ph
pnni-1 12/5/2012 | 3:07:57 PM
re: Hitachi GPON Gets RUS Approval I'm not that familiar with the OS GPON product. But in 2003 the possibility of it being EPON is very high. The Hitachi product is true GPON not EPON called GPON. Some early PON vendors called EPON GPON. I would not call the 1220 GPON EPON, they are 2 totally different beasts. Hitachi uses true GEM to achieve 2.4down/1.2up. I question if other GPON vendors are truly using GEM as some of the docs I have read point to fixed cells which points to a BPON based transport within the PON.
cw.774 12/5/2012 | 3:07:57 PM
re: Hitachi GPON Gets RUS Approval Seams not. Anyone know if they are pursuing RUS?
paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 3:07:56 PM
re: Hitachi GPON Gets RUS Approval
To your question about the ATM portion of GPON. There is, in the standard but becoming obsolete, an ATM partition of the GPON Frame. Nobody has implemented it, as it would be simpler just to do BPON at that point.

seven
paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 3:07:56 PM
re: Hitachi GPON Gets RUS Approval
If you want your product to be purchased with RUS funds, you need RUS approval.

GPON initially had a range of speeds (in fact they are still in the standard). The 2.4/1.2 variant came out of the JPC as the primary variant. Motorola was pushing a 1.2/1.2 GPON (not EPON but GEM framed). OSI never did EPON.

seven
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