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Verizon Seeing 20/20

ATLANTA -- TelcoTV 2007 -- Verizon Communications Inc. (NYSE: VZ) announced today that it has boosted its upstream speeds to 20 Mbit/s on its FiOS Internet service to go along with the 20 Mbit/s downstream speed that is the standard offering in many of its markets.

So far, 5 Mbit/s has been the maximum upload speed available, so now you can rush out and get that HD camcorder you've been drooling over. (See Verizon Offers 20 Mbit/s Uploads.)

The service is available starting today in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. Verizon plans to offer it in the rest of its states soon and is also planning a small business offering.

"FiOS customers don't have to wait for a new technology standard that's years away to fully participate in today's interactive Web," said Susan Retta, VP of Broadband Solutions for Verizon in a company-issued statement.

The remark likely was a shot at AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T), which has maintained that it will be able to offer similar performance on its FTTN network through advances in compression technologies and standards such as MPEG-4 video formats.

Verizon's announcement represents a possible answer to some of the chatter here at the Telco TV conference in Atlanta. Among the topics being discussed are the telecommuting options made possible by advances in FTTH deployments.

Joe Savage, president of the FTTH Council , said this morning that his research shows that 13.4 percent of FTTH customers currently work from home an average of 7.3 days more per month because of their FTTH connection. (See Fun With FTTH Data .)

In addition to increased upload speeds, Verizon is offering subscribers to the service one gigabyte of network-based backup with upgrades up to 50 gigabytes available for additional charges.

— Raymond McConville, Reporter, Light Reading

rjmcmahon 12/5/2012 | 3:00:20 PM
re: Verizon Seeing 20/20 If I had 20Mbs uplink I'd pay for an offsite backup service. My wife and kids are generating a bunch of digital data (pictures and videos) and a disaster proof solution is necessary. My search for an USB disk enclosure with thermal-diode characteristics (i.e. externally fireproof while dissipating internally generated heat under normal operations) hasn't been successful. Is VZ going to announce offsite backup soon for FiOS customers?

Also, they'll need to block potential competitors like amazon's S3. I assume the 20Mbs up will only be to VZ networks and services while Amazon and others services will be connected via a silly straw (i.e. TDM). Is this right?
Mark Sebastyn 12/5/2012 | 3:00:19 PM
re: Verizon Seeing 20/20 This is great to see, but I have the 15/2 service at home and I don't know what I would do with 15Mbs up instead of 2Mbs.

If a killer app comes along that needs upload bandwidth, Verizon will wipe the floor with the cablecos. Until then, it is all marketing (which counts for a lot).
mbachari 12/5/2012 | 3:00:19 PM
re: Verizon Seeing 20/20 I was under the impression that Verizon adopted GPON by Motorola/Alcatel to deliver their FTTH services, but this is symmetrical 20/20 which as far as I know GPON can not deliver.

So what is Verizon using and by what vendor?
paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 3:00:18 PM
re: Verizon Seeing 20/20
FiOS is 100% BPON today not GPON and with primarily (90% or so) Tellabs equipment.

A 100/100 Mb/s service is quite achievable with BPON. I am not sure why you would believe you would need GPON for that.

seven
Stevery 12/5/2012 | 3:00:18 PM
re: Verizon Seeing 20/20 I don't know what I would do with 15Mbs up instead of 2Mbs.

I don't think it takes a lot of imagination.
My guess is that Verizon is on a path of content delivery using p2p. If I were rolling out that distributed system, I'd want to see what the real world network stats (outage prob, avg + sigma speed, etc) were first.
rjmcmahon 12/5/2012 | 3:00:18 PM
re: Verizon Seeing 20/20 Depending on where your service is, the over subscription and service symmetry will provide different results.

Right. The goal for VZ is to emulate what MSFT did in the early days, i.e. court developers and early adopters to their platform and then eventually roll in the successful ones. In other words, VZ might benefit by building some psuedo open data centers and announce them to the developer community. These data centers being strategically placed with respect to over subscription points might entice developers to build for VZ instead of building for Goog. Long shot, but possible.
paolo.franzoi 12/5/2012 | 3:00:18 PM
re: Verizon Seeing 20/20
Just like any other Home Internet Service, FiOS is an oversubscribed service with a given amount of oversubscription. That amount is unknown in the residential High Speed Internet business - nobody publishes this stuff.

So, there are several points of oversubscription along the way in any of these types of services. There is oversubscription in the Access, in the Metro, and in the local carrier's backbone and in the core of the Internet.

Depending on where your service is, the oversubcription and service symmetry will provide different results.

seven
rjmcmahon 12/5/2012 | 3:00:18 PM
re: Verizon Seeing 20/20 This is great to see, but I have the 15/2 service at home and I don't know what I would do with 15Mbs up instead of 2Mbs.

Yep, that's the holy grail. The other thing is that the 20Mbs up is likely only to a local VZ network and data center so any new apps won't be hosted by 3rd parties on the internet (Goog, Yahoo, Amazon, etc.) rather by VZ themselves.

Offsite backup seems like low hanging fruit. Also, sending large files via email becomes possible. Finally, the promise of the network disks, e.g. tivo with NFS/LVM might pass fair use tests. The industry might have to build the equivalent of a modern day Network compute device, probably designed and optimized for a specific applications, one example being digital photo editing.

My goal since establishing a home network with multiple users has been to not store any personal data on local PCs, only OS and apps. This allows me to back things up, upgrade PCs, access the data from any home device, etc. without much of a fuss. Though, I'm not sure I trust VZ w/respect to privacy and civil liberties. Yahoo has demonstrated they will not protect users' civil liberties but will hand over all communications to any government agent without any fight.

PS. I don't think VZ can build out FiOS with high speed upload P2P. The media companies will revolt and yank all of their broadcast content.
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