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Bring on the Cyborgs

9:30 AM -- Apologies for blogging something relevant to our industry, but this story from today's Financial Times made our short-hairs rise:

    An Ohio company has embedded silicon chips in two of its employees - the first known case in which US workers have been “tagged” electronically as a way of identifying them.

    CityWatcher.com, a private video surveillance company, said it was testing the technology as a way of controlling access to a room where it holds security video footage for government agencies and the police...

    “There’s nothing pulsing or sending out a signal,” said
    [company CEO Sean] Darks, who has had a chip in his own arm. “It’s not a GPS chip. My wife can’t tell where I am.”
Thanks for the reassurance, Mr. Darks, but your marital difficulties are your own bidness.

As for the rest of us... Does anyone else find this nightmarish? Or are you too anesthetized for nightmares?

— Larry, Attack Monkey, Light Reading

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blackdiamond 12/5/2012 | 4:06:28 AM
re: Bring on the Cyborgs So let me get this straight, a company embeds chips into employees as a way of tracking access to sensitive information from government agencies and police? Interesting. On one hand the NY Times will find it harder to get classified information handed to their hack reporters and an extra layer of security is added to sensitive information. On the other hand if you don't like it you can certainly quit and go find another job.
Larry, Monkey 12/5/2012 | 4:06:27 AM
re: Bring on the Cyborgs Your argument is akin to "Only the guilty need to worry about their privacy rights" or the good ol' "If you don't like it here, move to Russia."

Yes, "you can certainly quit and go find another job." They're just hanging about, as we all know, like overripe bananas.

But it's a dead cert that if chip implants work for one, they'll, before long, work for all. And they'll be performing all sorts of helpful functions. This camel's nose is well inside the tent.

Does the desire for security trump all other considerations? What a sorry excuse for a worldview.
russ4br 12/5/2012 | 4:06:27 AM
re: Bring on the Cyborgs On the other hand if you don't like it you can certainly quit and go find another job.

Is it that easy? ... Will they have procedures in place to make sure you won't leak classified security information to the NYTimes/liberal media or sign on a book contract for "My Life as a Borg", etc ... They probably will have to have some sort of selective memory restructuring in place ... or else?

Larry, Monkey 12/5/2012 | 4:06:26 AM
re: Bring on the Cyborgs "Lastly," you write, "what is desire for security other than one of mankind's most basic needs?"

Fatuous nonsense. "Security" as employed here is not a Platonic ideal. The issue at hand is securing proprietary information.

So let's rephrase: "Lastly, what is desire for securing proprietary information other than one of mankind's most basic needs?"

Sorry. I don't rate it as highly as securing my privacy and the integrity of my body.
telco1158 12/5/2012 | 4:06:26 AM
re: Bring on the Cyborgs "This camel's nose is well inside the tent."

Now that's an allegory!

On a serious note, our neighbors south of the border have several of their government officials implanted with chips to help combat the rise in kidnappings. This is one ugly camel I don't want in our tent.
blackdiamond 12/5/2012 | 4:06:26 AM
re: Bring on the Cyborgs If you don't want to work at a company that asks for chips to be embedded in you then you have the right to go somewhere else. Just like you can bail if someone offers you more money, a shorter commute or flex time. And, plenty of people out there sign nondisclosures with penalties laid out for breaching them.
blackdiamond 12/5/2012 | 4:06:26 AM
re: Bring on the Cyborgs No, it isn't. In this specific instance a company is taking steps to ensure privacy by placing checks on those with access to sensitive information. If government and police are monitoring certain details about people then why shouldn't there be the utmost care in protection? I don't see the jump.

Secondly, employment is not a right contrary to what liberals believe and nor is it being forced on anyone. If you don't wish to work at that particular job then move on. Furthermore, in many instances people do submit to "privacy violations" in going to work every day with companies' ability to monitor email and web surfing habits, what sections of the building they enter or how they spend their time.

Lastly, what is desire for security other than one of mankind's most basic needs? Frankly your comments reflect a worldview that is rather naive.
Larry, Monkey 12/5/2012 | 4:06:25 AM
re: Bring on the Cyborgs They might better insert CHIPS -- Erik Estrada and, my namesake, the great Larry Wilcox.
blackdiamond 12/5/2012 | 4:06:25 AM
re: Bring on the Cyborgs telco1158:

The implanting of chips or the rampant amount of kidnapping that goes on down there? The chips may aid in recovery and create less incentive for kidnapping but it's sort of like an automotive retrieval system. You have to notice the person is gone in short enough time to have it matter. Otherwise, what's to stop the bad guys from cutting out the chip or just killing the captive anyway?

Better to clean up the corruption down there which Vince Fox simply isn't going to do.
blackdiamond 12/5/2012 | 4:06:25 AM
re: Bring on the Cyborgs Kindly refrain from rephrasing my statements so as to advance your agenda. I responded directly to the comment that you offered, nothing more.



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