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100G Ethernet

100 GigE Again

10:15 AM -- NEW YORK -- Day 2 of Ethernet Expo 2007. The Level 3 keynote from Jeff Tench, senior vice president of product delivery, is presenting yet another cry for 100-Gbit/s Ethernet.

Level 3's projections for 2010 show that some edge connections will require 60 lines of link-aggregated 10-Gbit/s Ethernet, and some intranode and backbone connections will use 150 aggregated lines.

"We really see 100-Gbit/s Ethernet leapfrogging 40 Gbit/s as for transport going forward," if only because of the scale the network will demand, Tench says.

Unlike Verizon Communications Inc. (NYSE: VZ), Level 3 isn't asking for 100 Gbit/s right now, but Tench hammered on the need for 100 Gbit/s multiple times. (See Verizon Gears Up for 100 Gig.)

Leftover from Day 1, there's a sound bite from yesterday's keynote by Steve Alexander, CTO with Ciena Corp. (NYSE: CIEN):

    The problem we all made ourselves into with the 40-Gbit/s world is that we made it a photonics problem and an electronics problem at the same time... The approach the vast majority of people are taking at 100 Gbit/s is to not turn it into an electronics problem.

He's referring to the fact that chip makers are looking at using 20- or 25-Gbit/s channels on their devices, rather than going directly to 100 Gbit/s. The slower speeds are possible to run on-chip without having to delve into new physics research.

So, for folks anxious for 100-Gbit/s Ethernet, the wait could have been worse. (See 100-GigE Not Coming Soon Enough.)

— Craig Matsumoto, West Coast Editor, Light Reading

Stevery 12/5/2012 | 3:00:42 PM
re: 100 GigE Again The problem we all made ourselves into with the 40-Gbit/s world is that we made it a photonics problem and an electronics problem at the same time...

Nonsense.

The electronics was not a problem, and there were startups with beautiful 40G electronics. I would suspect that Steve is confusing things that his company cannot do with things that genuinely can not be done.

In reality, it was an economics problem. The volumes don't support the price that people are willing to pay. They still don't as near as I can tell (and I would love to be wrong on this.)


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