& cplSiteName &

Cloud Helps Companies Face Disaster Head-On

Denise Culver
Heavy Lifting Analyst Notes
Denise Culver
5/13/2014
50%
50%

When Hurricane Sandy hit the Atlantic Coast in October 2012, the resulting power outages, storm damage, and lost business cost an estimated $50 billion. One of the hardest lessons for many companies affected was that having no disaster recovery (DR) -- or ineffective DR -- during a natural disaster can be the difference between staying in business and no longer having a business after such a storm.

The impact of Sandy -- as well as other disasters, both natural and manmade -- has pushed the envelope for businesses to place their DR in the cloud. As more businesses move DR to the cloud, the solutions are growing in popularity for several reasons.

Most cloud-based DR comes with guaranteed service-level agreements (SLAs) that promise to make companies' information accessible and indestructible at any time. For instance, if a company is using a physical off-site data center that is located close to the main location of the company, that site could be affected by any disaster that affects the company. When using a cloud-based DR solution, the systems are accessible in the cloud, which is located far from the primary site and ensures that it will not be affected by the disaster.

This is just some of the information in this month's Heavy Reading Service Provider IT Insider, "Disaster Recovery Hits The Cloud, Finds Silver Lining." This report examines the cloud-based disaster recovery market, analyzing the features that are most likely to be implemented over the next two years, as well as drivers expected in the market. It discusses challenges in the industry and includes a comparative analysis of solutions available. Finally, it examines the geographic landscape of the market and details trends that are likely to occur in the industry over the next 18-24 months.

Cloud-based DR also is gaining traction because it generally is cheaper to implement than physical DR. Cloud DR eliminates investment in offsite duplicate IT infrastructure, which significantly reduces the upfront and overall capex costs. The usage-based, opex cost of cloud DR enables customers to only pay for what they need, allowing each business to determine which systems and data are critical for performance in the event of a disaster.

Additionally, the recovery time for cloud-based DR depends on the customer's needs and the service provider's capabilities. The speed of a company's recovery depends on the SLA it chooses.

Without question, cloud-based DR lowers costs and is more flexible for companies facing a disaster situation. As the space continues to mature, look for service providers to merge and forge new partnerships that bring more speed and improved SLAs to customers. Also look for more smaller and medium-sized businesses to entrust their systems to cloud-based DR, as the costs are driven further down and become more reasonable for smaller customers that have disaster recovery needs.

— Denise Culver, Research Analyst, Heavy Reading Service Provider IT Insider

Disaster Recovery Hits The Cloud, Finds Silver Lining, a 25-page report in PDF format, is available as part of an annual subscription (6 bimonthly issues) to Heavy Reading Service Provider IT Insider, priced at $1,595. Individual reports are available for $900.

(2)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
Phil_Britt
50%
50%
Phil_Britt,
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/13/2014 | 3:54:35 PM
Cloud should be only part of the strategy
While cloud DR makes sense in that a company doesn't have its disaster recovery on site, which would mean it is subject to the same power outages or natural disasters of the primary system, a cloud system can fail as well. So a company should seek multiple DR solutions for the safety of redundancy.
Mitch Wagner
50%
50%
Mitch Wagner,
User Rank: Lightning
5/13/2014 | 2:09:18 PM
Cloud DR
DR is one of the most basic applications for the enterprise cloud. You might say it's a gateway drug. :)
More Blogs from Heavy Lifting Analyst Notes
To succeed in the enterprise market telcos need to play to their strengths.
Fiber is making a comeback and converged access infrastructure is helping to push the market collectively towards 5G and other services.
By customizing cloud services and providing a more holistic solution to business customers' needs, traditional telcos can increase their chances of winning in the enterprise market.
The challenge for telcos is to achieve cloud-network synergy: making cloud the gateway to develop new B2B services.
During the past year or so, vendors have taken interest in intent-based networks (IBNs), and standards development organizations have started working toward finding an industry standard for this cost- and time-saving development.
Featured Video
From The Founder
The 'gleaming city on a hill,' Steve Saunders calls it. But who is going to take us from today's NFV componentry to the grand future of a self-driving network? Here's a look at the vendors hoping to make it happen.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
September 28, 2017, Denver, CO
October 18, 2017, Colorado Convention Center - Denver, CO
November 1, 2017, The Royal Garden Hotel
November 1, 2017, The Montcalm Marble Arch
November 2, 2017, 8 Northumberland Avenue, London, UK
November 10, 2017, The Westin Times Square, New York, NY
November 30, 2017, The Westin Times Square
All Upcoming Live Events
Infographics
With the mobile ecosystem becoming increasingly vulnerable to security threats, AdaptiveMobile has laid out some of the key considerations for the wireless community.
Hot Topics
Could the Connected Car Help Prevent Terrorism?
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 9/15/2017
AT&T Wants to Ditch the Dish
Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 9/13/2017
Apple's New iPhones: No Gigabit LTE for You!
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 9/14/2017
Cities Slam FCC on Broadband Proceedings
Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 9/15/2017
Animals with Phones
Live Digital Audio

Understanding the full experience of women in technology requires starting at the collegiate level (or sooner) and studying the technologies women are involved with, company cultures they're part of and personal experiences of individuals.

During this WiC radio show, we will talk with Nicole Engelbert, the director of Research & Analysis for Ovum Technology and a 23-year telecom industry veteran, about her experiences and perspectives on women in tech. Engelbert covers infrastructure, applications and industries for Ovum, but she is also involved in the research firm's higher education team and has helped colleges and universities globally leverage technology as a strategy for improving recruitment, retention and graduation performance.

She will share her unique insight into the collegiate level, where women pursuing engineering and STEM-related degrees is dwindling. Engelbert will also reveal new, original Ovum research on the topics of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, security and augmented reality, as well as discuss what each of those technologies might mean for women in our field. As always, we'll also leave plenty of time to answer all your questions live on the air and chat board.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed