& cplSiteName &

IHG Hack Hit Hospitality Guests in the Wallet

Curtis Franklin

In December 2016, hotel conglomerate IHG announced a data breach that affected credit card transactions in restaurants and shops at approximately a dozen hotels. Last week, the company provided a bit of clarity on the word "approximately": After further investigation, it seems that customers at more than 1,000 hotels might have been hit by credit card theft.

A Danish researcher, Christian Sonne, walked through the list of affected hotels and put the minimum number at 1,175. For customers, though, the issue might be less, "how many hotels" and more, "how will this affect me?"

Image: Creative Commons License by teadrinker

Image: Creative Commons License by teadrinker

In a report on the incident, researchers at Kaspersky Labs note that the breach was due to malware on the servers they use to process credit cards. The malware captured "track data" -- information on credit cards' magnetic stripes, including the card number, expiration date and internal verification code.

IHG acknowledged that the breaches were active through at least December 29, 2016, though there's no certainty that the malware was eliminated until the breach was investigated in February and March of this year. The hospitality industry as a whole has been hit hard by breaches of this sort; in a blog post on the subject, security researcher Brian Krebs wrote, "Hotel brands that have acknowledged card breaches over the last year after prompting by KrebsOnSecurity include Kimpton Hotels, Trump Hotels (twice), Hilton, Mandarin Oriental and White Lodging (twice). Card breaches also have hit hospitality chains Starwood Hotels and Hyatt."

Some commentators have criticized IHG for the website on which they list the properties known to have been affected by the breach. The location website asks users to walk through a number of drop-down menus in order to find the hotels in a particular city that were hit by the malware. The listing, while complete, can be cumbersome, especially for business travelers who might have stayed in a number of different properties during the time of the attacks.

In the announcement of the breaches, IHG notes that their new payment system makes the type of attack impossible and assures customers that all malware and traces of the attack have been removed from the IHG systems.

— Curtis Franklin, Security Editor, Light Reading. Follow him on Twitter @kg4gwa.

(4)  | 
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View        ADD A COMMENT
User Rank: Light Sabre
5/5/2017 | 11:23:46 AM
Re: Whose wallet?
Even though customer may not be hit in the wallet there may be some hours of trying to resolve false charges, and certainly the hotels' will be suffering for some time recovering from the wide spread incidents and the resulting bad feeling customers may have for patronizing the facilities anytime soon.
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/29/2017 | 9:20:30 PM
"More than 1,000" hotels is a lot! At first, I wondered if this might be a smallish hotel group, but it includes some big names in the industry. It's too bad they couldn't publish an easily searchable list for visitors to review...

I'm glad Krebs is on the case.
User Rank: Light Beer
4/25/2017 | 7:46:03 AM
Thanks for your article I will write the essay in a few hours. Very useful information! Keep sharing! 
User Rank: Light Sabre
4/21/2017 | 12:15:04 PM
Whose wallet?
I'm pretty sure that card users are not responsible for fraudulent charges.
Featured Video
From The Founder
Light Reading founder Steve Saunders recently visited the University of North Carolina Charlotte (UNCC) where Cisco's Tetration application is providing data center analytics, simplifying SDN, helping with cloud migration and overseeing white-list security policy.
Flash Poll
Upcoming Live Events
March 20-22, 2018, Denver Marriott Tech Center
March 22, 2018, Denver, Colorado | Denver Marriott Tech Center
March 28, 2018, Kansas City Convention Center
April 4, 2018, The Westin Dallas Downtown, Dallas
April 9, 2018, Las Vegas Convention Center
May 14-16, 2018, Austin Convention Center
May 14, 2018, Brazos Hall, Austin, Texas
September 24-26, 2018, Westin Westminster, Denver
October 9, 2018, The Westin Times Square, New York
October 23, 2018, Georgia World Congress Centre, Atlanta, GA
November 7-8, 2018, London, United Kingdom
November 8, 2018, The Montcalm by Marble Arch, London
November 15, 2018, The Westin Times Square, New York
December 4-6, 2018, Lisbon, Portugal
All Upcoming Live Events
Hot Topics
AT&T Likens DoJ Suit to Shaved Persian Cat
Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 3/12/2018
Trump Blocks Broadcom's Qualcomm Acquisition
Dan Jones, Mobile Editor, 3/12/2018
John Deere Bets the Farm on AI, IoT
Scott Ferguson, Editor, Enterprise Cloud, 3/12/2018
Rumor Mill: SoftBank Still Eyeing Charter
Mari Silbey, Senior Editor, Cable/Video, 3/12/2018
Animals with Phones
Live Digital Audio

A CSP's digital transformation involves so much more than technology. Crucial – and often most challenging – is the cultural transformation that goes along with it. As Sigma's Chief Technology Officer, Catherine Michel has extensive experience with technology as she leads the company's entire product portfolio and strategy. But she's also no stranger to merging technology and culture, having taken a company — Tribold — from inception to acquisition (by Sigma in 2013), and she continues to advise service providers on how to drive their own transformations. This impressive female leader and vocal advocate for other women in the industry will join Women in Comms for a live radio show to discuss all things digital transformation, including the cultural transformation that goes along with it.

Like Us on Facebook
Twitter Feed