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Rise to the BYOD Challenge

Denise Culver
Heavy Lifting Analyst Notes
Denise Culver, Online Research Director
8/10/2012
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A survey issued a few weeks ago showed that about 60 percent of enterprises have seen an increase in the amount of malware infections over the past 12 months. But the problems didn't originate from company desktop computers or email viruses. They originated from the use of insecure mobile devices being used in the workplace.

And that isn't an isolated study. Bring your own device (BYOD) is an issue that's resounding strongly across enterprises of all sizes in every country. While enterprises have largely learned to grapple with the security issues associated with desktop computers, corporate-owned devices and networks, they just don't have the resources or time to track down every employee who uses privately owned smartphones, tablets and other devices to access company information over the corporate network.

The reality is that enterprises shouldn't want to stifle the use of technology. It improves employee productivity and satisfaction. And, quite frankly, people often get a lot more done when left to their own devices than when given a set of tools that works for someone else.

But enterprises should have a healthy dose of fear. Mobile network operators (MNOs), mobile technology vendors and mobile security vendors should be working together on enabling BYOD. The companies featured in this month's Heavy Reading Mobile Networks Insider report, Enabling BYOD Creates Major Opportunity for Mobile Space, are facing a daunting challenge, but it's one with great promise. This is not a problem that's going away any time soon, and it's one that needs the collective attention of these industries so that enterprises can embrace mobile technology as much as consumers have.

This report examines the market for enabling BYOD, analyzing the most promising verticals for enabling BYOD and discussing drivers and challenges in the industry. It includes a comparative analysis of available solutions, examines the geographic landscape of the market and details trends that will likely occur in the industry over the next 18-24 months.

— Denise Culver, Research Analyst, Heavy Reading Mobile Networks Insider






The report, Enabling BYOD Creates Major Opportunity for Mobile Space, is available as part of an annual single-user subscription (six issues) to Mobile Networks Insider, priced at $1,595. Individual reports are available for $900. To subscribe, please visit: www.heavyreading.com/mobile-networks.

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Tekelec
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Tekelec,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:24:04 PM
re: Rise to the BYOD Challenge



As so many devices are brought to the enterprise, they will be engaged constantly in “anytime, anywhere” communications with social networks, applications and services. This means the amount of communication and signaling that will traverse networks on which those enterprises rely will actually outpace the data traffic so many enterprisesfocus on. You are right in that all stakeholders should work collaboratively (MNOs, mobile tech vendors, enterprises, etc) so the quality of user experience is enhanced, not encumbered, by the networks empowering enterprise environments (as with cloud and M2M). http://blog.tekelec.com/

paolo.franzoi
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paolo.franzoi,
User Rank: Light Sabre
12/5/2012 | 5:23:26 PM
re: Rise to the BYOD Challenge


 


Just one point of clarification.   ALL mail sent from or received by the company's server is NOT private to the end user.  Employers basically can look at all that traffic anytime for any reason.  Those mails are private and confidential to the employer not the employee.


As to avoiding the BYOD thing.  That ship has sailed.


seven


 

Trilly Campanellino
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Trilly Campanellino,
User Rank: Light Beer
12/5/2012 | 5:23:26 PM
re: Rise to the BYOD Challenge


There could be several reasons for this. One of them could be employees wanting to access restricted sites like Facebook or YouTube. There are two things here: (1) If the employee uses his own device (like an iPhone) and connects to the Internet using the company's network (2) Employee uses his own device and connects via the carrier's network (ATT/Verizon 4G). In both cases, security issues exists. In case (1), the employer's network admins could impose restrictions on the network usage. For example, "Block all traffic emanating from iPhone" (easy to fetch via HTTP User-Agent field) but the user might simply 'fool' the Firewall by using other apps (Ex: Download Lite for iPhone) where in you can set the app to 'identify itself' as Firefox. The firewall ACL will fail here (since the firewall will most probably not block traffic coming out of Firefox) and the employee now is using the company network to access sites which are not supposed to be visited. The problem is how much do you trust iPhone's security levels. Most employees sync up their personal devices to the company mailers (like MS Exchange server) and will have all/some of the company mails stored on their phones (or at least the headers). We will all agree that most of those mails are private and confidential. If the device is compromised, there is a very good chance that a malicious cracker could actually access those private mails even when the employee is connected to the company's network. In case (2) the same issues exist. Since the mails/headers are stored locally on the device, having a compromised device will put those P & C data at risk even if you are using your carrier's network. Now how can company's network admins verify the security 'strength' of employees' personal devices? Theoretically, it could be done but might result in a lot of costs. And if the employee brings his iPhone/iPad/iPod or any such devices, the costs only go up. Avg # devcies/employee might come up to 2. You cannot then, simply BLOCK ALL traffic from personal devices since many employees might not be happy.

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